Search results for 'Pamala Sue Anderson' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Pamala Sue Anderson (2001). Gender and the Infinite: On the Aspiration to Be All There Is. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 50 (1/3):191-212.score: 290.0
  2. Pamela Sue Anderson & Beverley Clack (eds.) (2004). Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Critical Readings. Routledge.score: 150.0
    Feminist philosophy of religion as a subject of study has developed in recent years because of the identification and exposure of explicit sexism in much of the traditional philosophical thinking about religion. This struggle with a discipline shaped almost exclusively by men has led feminist philosophers to redress the problematic biases of gender, race, class and sexual orientation of the subject. Anderson and Clack bring together new and key writings on the core topics and approaches to this growing field. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Pamela Sue Anderson (2007). Feminist Challenges to Conceptions of God: Exploring Divine Ideals. Philosophia 35 (3-4):361-370.score: 120.0
    This paper presents a feminist intervention into debates concerning the relation between human subjects and a divine ideal. I turn to what Irigarayan feminists challenge as a masculine conception of ‘the God’s eye view’ of reality. This ideal functions not only in philosophy of religion, but in ethics, politics, epistemology and philosophy of science: it is given various names from ‘the competent judge’ to the ‘the ideal observer’ (IO) whose view is either from nowhere or everywhere. The question is whether, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Pamela Sue Anderson (2006). Life, Death and (Inter)Subjectivity: Realism and Recognition in Continental Feminism. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):41 - 59.score: 120.0
    I begin with the assumption that a philosophically significant tension exists today in feminist philosophy of religion between those subjects who seek to become divine and those who seek their identity in mutual recognition. My critical engagement with the ambiguous assertions of Luce Irigaray seeks to demonstrate, on the one hand, that a woman needs to recognize her own identity but, on the other hand, that each subject whether male or female must struggle in relation to the other in order (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Pamela Sue Anderson (1999). Tracing Sexual Difference: Beyond the Aporia of the Other. [REVIEW] Sophia 38 (1):54-73.score: 120.0
  6. L. V. Anderson (1984). Lyle V. Anderson -- The Representation and Resolution of the Nuclear Conflict. Philosophy and Social Criticism 10 (3-4):67-79.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Pamela Sue Anderson (2012). The Philosophical Significance of Kant's Religion. Faith and Philosophy 29 (2):151-162.score: 120.0
    In my response-paper, I dispute the claim of Firestone and Jacobs that “Kant’s turn to transcendental analysis of the moral disposition via pure cognition is perhaps the most important new element of his philosophy of religion” (In Defense of Kant’s Religion, 233). In particular, I reject the role given—in the latter—to “pure cognition.” Instead I propose a Kantian variation on cognition which remains consistent with Kant’s moral postulate for the existence of God. I urge that we treat this postulate as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Pamela Sue Anderson (2014). Editorial: In the Guise of a Miracle. Sophia 53 (2):171-181.score: 120.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Pamela Sue Anderson (2001). “Standpoint”. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:131-153.score: 120.0
    This article defends the place of “standpoint” in a realist epistemology. The conception and role of standpoint are proposed to be receptive to the shifting perspectives of actual knowers. A standpoint is distinguished from a spontaneous perspective or mere outlook. In this realist epistemology standpoint will have something to do with background beliefs. but rather than a starting point, it is an achievement gained as a result of a struggle for less biased knowledge. Epistemologists currently employ various conceptions of standpoint. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Pamela Sue Anderson (2006). Divinity, Incarnation and Intersubjectivity: On Ethical Formation and Spiritual Practice. Philosophy Compass 1 (3):335-356.score: 120.0
    In what sense, if any, does the dominant conception of the traditional theistic God as disembodied inform our embodied experiences? Feminist philosophers of religion have been either explicitly or implicitly preoccupied by a philosophical failure to address such questions concerning embodiment and its relationship to the divine. To redress this failure, certain feminist philosophers have sought to appropriate Luce Irigaray’s argument that embodied divinity depends upon women themselves becoming divine. This article assesses weaknesses in the Irigarayan position, notably the problematic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Holly Randell-Moon, Nicole Anderson, Tracey Bretag, Anthony Burke, Sue Grieshaber, Anthony Lambert, David Saltmarsh & Nicola Yelland (2011). Journal Editing and Ethical Research Practice: Perspectives of Journal Editors. Ethics and Education 6 (3):225 - 238.score: 120.0
    This article offers perspectives from academics with recent journal editing experience on a range of ethical issues and dilemmas that regularly pose challenges for those in editorial roles. Each contributing author has provided commentary and reflection on a select topic that was identified in the research literature concerning academic publishing and journal editing. Topics discussed include the ethical responsibilities of working with international and early career contributors to develop work for publication, balancing influence and responsibility to a journal's disciplinary field (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Pamela Sue Anderson, Hent DeVries, David Ray Griffin, William Hasker, Fergus Kerr, John Macquarrie, Adrian Peperzak, Philip L. Quinn, William J. Wainwright & Keith Ward (2005). Part One: Articles. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 58:207-214.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. E. Bruce Flory & Anna May Anderson (1976). Ernest Paul Anderson 1947-1976. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 50 (2):135 -.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Pamela Sue Anderson, Mikael Stenmark, Vincent Brümmer, Arie L. Molendijk & Marcel Sarot (forthcoming). A Case for a Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Transforming Philosophy's Imagery and Myths'. Ars Disputandi: The Online Journal in Philosophy of Religion (September 2000).score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Pamela Sue Anderson (2004). An Epistemological-Ethical Approach to Philosophy of Religion: Learning to Listen. In Pamela Sue Anderson & Beverley Clack (eds.), Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Critical Readings. Routledge.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Pamela Sue Anderson (1997). A Feminist Philosophy of Religion: The Rationality and Myths of Religious Belief. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Pamela Sue Anderson (2009). A Turn to Spiritual Virtues in Philosophy of Religion : 'The Thoughtful Love of Life'. In John Cornwell & Michael McGhee (eds.), Philosophers and God: At the Frontiers of Faith and Reason. Continuum.score: 120.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Pamela Sue Anderson (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Religion. In Paul Copan & Chad V. Meister (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: Classic and Contemporary Issues. Blackwell Pub..score: 120.0
  19. John Anderson, John Anderson Lecture Notes and Other Writings.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Pamela Sue Anderson (2002). 5 Myth and Feminist Philosophy. In Kevin Schilbrack (ed.), Thinking Through Myths: Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. John R. Anderson & Alison Gopnik, Marshall M. Weinberg Conference: The Future of Cognitive Science - Thursday Afternoon (Oct. 16, 2008) Session: John R. Anderson and Alison Gopnik. [REVIEW]score: 120.0
    Six leading experts speak about the future of cognitive science.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Pamela Sue Anderson (ed.) (2010). New Topics in Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Resistance, Religion and Ethical-Political Relations.score: 120.0
  23. Pamela Sue Anderson (2014). Obituary: Gillian O. Howie, 1965–2013. Sophia 53 (2):167-169.score: 120.0
    The present special issue of Sophia on ‘feminist philosophy of religion’ is dedicated to Gillian O. Howie who died in 2013. This essay is a short obituary touching on Howie’s philosophical and personal legacy. The intention is to give a brief overview of Howie as a courageous woman with boundless intellectual curiosity and passionate commitments to feminist activities; these include writing and living her philosophical vision for creating a just society with collective political action. Howie inspired both women and men (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Pamela Sue Anderson (2011). Postmodernism and Religion. In Stuart Sim (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Postmodernism. Routledge.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Pamela Sue Anderson (2002). Ricoeur's Reclamation of Autonomy: Unity, Plurality and Totality. In John Wall, William Schweiker & W. David Hall (eds.), Paul Ricoeur and Contemporary Moral Thought. Routledge.score: 120.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Pamela Sue Anderson (2000). Sacrificed Lives: Mimetic Desire, Sexual Difference and Murder. Cultural Values 4 (2):216-227.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Pamela Sue Anderson (2013). The Other. In Nicholas Adams, George Pattison & Graham Ward (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Theology and Modern European Thought. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. G. Anderson (1999). 'We Went Through Psychological Hell': A Case Report of Prenatal Diagnosis-Response by Gwen Anderson, Shriver Center for Mental Retardation, Waltham MA, USA-Prenatal Genetics Services Signal a Much Deeper Problem in Health Care Delivery. Nursing Ethics 6 (3):254-256.score: 120.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Patrice Haynes (2014). Encouraging a Thoughtful Love of Life: Pamela Sue Anderson and Gillian Howie on Practising Philosophy. Sophia 53 (2):199-213.score: 62.0
    Wherever you turn your eyes the world can shine like transfiguration. You don’t have to bring a thing to it except a little willingness to see. Only, who could have the courage to see it?—Marilynne RobinsonMarilynne Robinson, Gilead (London: Virago Press, 2004), p. 280.Preamble: Going the Bloody Hard WayThe writings of Pamela Sue Anderson and Gillian Howie have been, and continue to be, important in helping to shape the development of my own philosophical vision. Yet my commitment to (a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John R. Anderson (2007). How Can the Human Mind Occur in the Physical Universe? OUP USA.score: 60.0
    "The question for me is how can the human mind occur in the physical universe? We now know that the world is governed by physics. We now understand the way biology nestles comfortably within that. The issue is how will the mind do that as well?" Alan Newell, 4 December 1991, Carnegie Mellon University -/- The argument John Anderson gives in this book was inspired by the passage above, from the last lecture by one of the pioneers of cognitive (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. A. Anderson (2011). Verbin, N., Divinely Abused: A Philosophical Perspective on Job and His Kin. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (2):155-159.score: 60.0
    Verbin, N., Divinely abused: a philosophical perspective on Job and his kin Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11153-010-9262-5 Authors A. K. Anderson, Department of Religion, Wofford College, 429 N. Church St., Spartanburg, SC 29303, USA Journal International Journal for Philosophy of Religion Online ISSN 1572-8684 Print ISSN 0020-7047.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Michael Anderson, On the Grounds of (X)-Grounded Cognition.score: 60.0
    For the least the last 10 years, there has been growing interest in, and grow- ing evidence for, the intimate relations between more abstract or higher order cognition—such as reasoning, planning, and language use—and the more con- crete, immediate, or lower order operations of the perceptual and motor sys- tems that support seeing, feeling, moving, and manipulating. A sub-field of the larger research program in embodied cognition (Clark, 1997, 1998; Wilson, 2001; Anderson, 2003, 2007d, 2008; Gibbs, 2006), this work (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Amanda Anderson (2006). The Way We Argue Now: A Study in the Cultures of Theory. Princeton University Press.score: 60.0
    How do the ways we argue represent a practical philosophy or a way of life? Are concepts of character and ethos pertinent to our understanding of academic debate? In this book, Amanda Anderson analyzes arguments in literary, cultural, and political theory, with special attention to the ways in which theorists understand ideals of critical distance, forms of subjective experience, and the determinants of belief and practice. Drawing on the resources of the liberal and rationalist tradition, Anderson interrogates the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Michael L. Anderson, Massive Redeployment and the Evolution of Cognition.score: 60.0
    Part of understanding the functional organization of the brain is understanding how it evolved. This talk presents evidence suggesting that while the brain may have originally emerged as an organ with functionally dedicated regions, the creative re-use of these regions has played a significant role in its evolutionary development. This would parallel the evolution of other capabilities wherein existing structures, evolved for other purposes, are re-used and built upon in the course of continuing evolutionary development (“exaptation”: Gould & Vrba 1982). (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Douglas R. Anderson (2006). Philosophy Americana: Making Philosophy at Home in American Culture. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    In this engaging book, Douglas Anderson begins with the assumption that philosophy—the Greek love of wisdom—is alive and well in American culture. At the same time, professional philosophy remains relatively invisible. Anderson traverses American life to find places in the wider culture where professional philosophy in the distinctively American tradition can strike up a conversation. How might American philosophers talk to us about our religious experience, or political engagement, or literature—or even, popular music? Anderson’s second aim is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. John R. Anderson & Christian Lebiere (2003). The Newell Test for a Theory of Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):587-601.score: 60.0
    Newell (1980; 1990) proposed that cognitive theories be developed in an effort to satisfy multiple criteria and to avoid theoretical myopia. He provided two overlapping lists of 13 criteria that the human cognitive architecture would have to satisfy in order to be functional. We have distilled these into 12 criteria: flexible behavior, real-time performance, adaptive behavior, vast knowledge base, dynamic behavior, knowledge integration, natural language, learning, development, evolution, and brain realization. There would be greater theoretical progress if we evaluated theories (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Greg Anderson (2003). The Athenian Experiment: Building an Imagined Political Community in Ancient Attica, 508-490 B.C. University of Michigan Press.score: 60.0
    In barely the space of one generation, Athens was transformed from a conventional city-state into something completely new--a region-state on a scale previously unthinkable. This book sets out to answer a seemingly simple question: How and when did the Athenian state attain the anomalous size that gave it such influence in Greek politics and culture in the classical period? Many scholars argue that Athens's incorporation of Attica was a gradual development, largely completed some two hundred years before the classical era. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. John Anderson, David Armstrong & Creagh Cole, Front Matter.score: 60.0
    'With this scheme, John Anderson joins a very distinguished line of philosophers who have presented us with a set of categories. We have first Plato (the doctrine of Highest Kinds in his dialogue The Sophist), then Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, and Samuel Alexander.' - D. M. Armstrong, from the introduction. Space, Time and the Categories presents a unique record of personal influence and inspiration over three generations of philosophers in Australia, England and Scotland. This work is a vitally important text (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Sybol Anderson (2012). Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (Eds), Recognition and Social Ontology. Critical Horizons 13 (1):134 - 137.score: 60.0
    Heikki Ikäheimo and Arto Laitinen (eds), Recognition and Social Ontology Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 134-137 Authors Sybol Cook Anderson, St. Mary's College of Maryland, USA Journal Critical Horizons: A Journal of Philosophy & Social Theory Online ISSN 1568-5160 Print ISSN 1440-9917 Journal Volume Volume 13 Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1 / 2012.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Richard G. Anderson, William H. Greene, B. D. McCullough & H. D. Vinod (2008). The Role of Data/Code Archives in the Future of Economic Research. Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (1):99-119.score: 60.0
    This essay examines the role of data and program?code archives in making economic research ?replicable.? Replication of published results is recognized as an essential part of the scientific method. Yet, historically, both the ?demand for? and ?supply of? replicable results in economics has been minimal. ?Respect for the scientific method? is not sufficient to motivate either economists or editors of professional journals to ensure the replicability of published results. We enumerate the costs and benefits of mandatory data and code archives, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Roger Sue (forthcoming). Du temps social aux temps sociaux. Rhuthmos.score: 60.0
    Extrait de R. Sue, Temps et ordre social. Sociologie des temps sociaux, Paris, PUF, 1994, p. 28-32. Nous remercions Roger Sue de nous avoir autorisé à reproduire ici ce texte. Il faut renoncer à faire une sociologie du temps en général. Renoncement difficile pour le sociologue toujours enclin à penser la société sous forme d'unité. Unité qui produirait son propre temps, un temps unique, le temps de la société. Cette illusion de l'unité est extrêmement forte lorsqu'il s'agit du temps, en (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Alexander A. Petrov, David J. Jilk, Randall C. O'Reilly & Michael L. Anderson (2010). The Leabra Architecture: Specialization Without Modularity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):286.score: 60.0
    The posterior cortex, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex in the Leabra architecture are specialized in terms of various neural parameters, and thus are predilections for learning and processing, but domain-general in terms of cognitive functions such as face recognition. Also, these areas are not encapsulated and violate Fodorian criteria for modularity. Anderson's terminology obscures these important points, but we applaud his overall message.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Myrdene Anderson & Devika Chawla (forthcoming). Exploring the Semiosic Tensions Between Autobiography, Biography, Ethnography, and Autoethnography. Semiotics:1-9.score: 60.0
    The Saami assert that "to move on is better than to stay put" (jot'tit lea buorit go orrot). The senior (in more ways than one) author, Myrdene Anderson, found as a Saami ethnographer that her life history resonated well with this Saami philosophy. In addition, Anderson had adopted from her own heritage the adage that "one can't hit a moving target". The Saami would also be comfortable with that formula. Together, one might minimally collapse and paraphrase both adages (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Deland S. Anderson (1996). Hegel's Speculative Good Friday: The Death of God in Philosophical Perspective. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    In this book Deland S. Anderson traces the origin of the idea, "God is dead," in the philosophy of G.W.F. Hegel. Focusing on issues of language, life, and learning, Anderson presents an integrated perspective on the death of God in Hegel's philosophy as it emerged in the early years at Jena. He argues that Hegel's pronouncement of the death of God was the beginning of his radically innovative system of speculative discourse, which revolutionized not only philosophy byt the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Alan Ross Anderson, Ruth Barcan Marcus, R. M. Martin & Frederic B. Fitch (eds.) (1975). The Logical Enterprise. Yale University Press.score: 60.0
    Metaphysics and language: Quine, W. V. O. On the individuation of attributes. Körner, S. On some relations between logic and metaphysics. Marcus, R. B. Does the principle of substitutivity rest on a mistake? Van Fraassen, B. C. Platonism's pyrrhic victory. Martin, R. M. On some prepositional relations. Kearns, J. T. Sentences and propositions.--Basic and combinatorial logic: Orgass, R. J. Extended basic logic and ordinal numbers. Curry, H. B. Representation of Markov algorithms by combinators.--Implication and consistency: Anderson, A. R. Fitch (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Steven Shakespeare (2014). The Imperceptible Work of God: Pamela Sue Anderson's Re-Visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion: Reason, Love and Epistemic Locatedness. Sophia 53 (2):193-197.score: 56.0
    This essay offers a response to Pamela Sue Anderson’s book, Re-visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion. It focuses on three key aspects of Anderson’s work: first, her concern with the often imperceptible reality of gender exclusions; secondly, her discussion of ineffability in dialogue with Adrian Moore’s work and thirdly, her defence of realism in response to Grace Jantzen. These themes constitute a welcome articulation of rationality within a feminist framework, whilst opening up rationality to the validity of non-propositional (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Sherah Bloor (2014). Claiming Kant for Feminism: A Discussion of Anderson's Re-Visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion. Sophia 53 (2):299-303.score: 51.0
    I wish to expose the possibility of a Kantian feminism made actual by Pamela Sue Anderson’s recent book Re-visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion: Reason, Love and Epistemic Locatedness. In this paper I show how Kantian philosophy structures Anderson’s project, and I argue that in embodying the spirit of Kantian critique, this project may be used to turn that spirit against the letter of its expression in an act that would claim Kant for feminism.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Charles Taliaferro (2007). Transcendence and Feminism: Response to Anderson's “Feminist Challenges to Conceptions of God”. Philosophia 35 (3-4):371-373.score: 49.0
    An argument that Pamela Sue Anderson’s critique of Irigaray commits her to a version of the Ideal Observer Theory, a theory Anderson rejects. This paper was delivered in the APA Pacific 2007 Mini-Conference on Models of God.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Roxana Baiasu (2014). Knowing How to Talk About What Cannot Be Said: Objectivity and Epistemic Locatedness. Sophia 53 (2):215-229.score: 42.0
    I take it that A. W. Moore is right when he said that ‘Wittgenstein was right: some things cannot be put into words. Moreover, some things that cannot be put into words are of the utmost philosophical importance’. There is, however, a constant threat of self-stultification whenever an attempt is made to put the ineffable into words. As Pamela Sue Anderson notes in Re-visioning gender in philosophy of religion: reason, love, and epistemic locatedness, certain recent approaches to ineffability—including Moore’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Terri Elliot & Making Strange What Had Appeared Familiar (forthcoming). The Monist: An International Journal of General Philosophical Inquiry (General Topic-Feminist Epistemology: For and Against) 77/4 (October 1994): 424-433. Also See Pamela Sue Anderson,'A Case for a Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Transforming Philosophy's Imagery and Myths'. [REVIEW] Ars Disputandi: The Online Journal in Philosophy of Religion.score: 42.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000