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  1. Paolo Vineis (2013). La ciabatta e il DNA. Iride 26 (2):401-414.
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  2. Paolo Vineis, Aneire Khan & Flavio D'Abramo (2011). Epistemological Issues Raised by Research on Climate Change. In Phyllis McKay Illari, Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (eds.), Causality in the Sciences. Oup Oxford.
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  3. Paolo Vineis (2009). I Due Dogmi: Oggettività Della Scienza E Integralismo Etico. Feltrinelli.
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  4. Paolo Vineis & Ronald Melnick (2008). A Darwinian Perspective: Right Premises, Questionable Conclusion. A Commentary on Niall Shanks and Rebecca Pyles'. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):6.
    As Dobzhansky wrote, nothing in biology makes sense outside the context of the evolutionary theory, and this truth has not been sufficiently explored yet by medicine. We comment on Shanks and Pyles' recently published paper, Evolution and medicine: the long reach of.
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  5. Paolo Vineis & Ronald Melnick (2008). Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:6.
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  6. Alessandra Parodi, David Neasham & Paolo Vineis (2006). Environment, Population, and Biology: A Short History of Modern Epidemiology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (3):357-368.
  7. Paolo Vineis & Micaela Ghisleni (2004). Risks, Causality, and the Precautionary Principle. Topoi 23 (2):203-210.
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  8. Donna Dickenson & Paolo Vineis (2002). Evidence-Based Medicine and Quality of Care. Health Care Analysis 10 (3):243-259.
    In this paper we set out to examine thearguments for and against the claim thatEvidence-Based Medicine (EBM) will improve thequality of care. In particular, we examine thefollowing issues.
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  9. Paolo Vineis (1995). Environmental Risks: Scientific Concepts and Social Perception. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (2).
    Using the example of air pollution, I criticize a restricted utilitarian view of environmental risks. It is likely that damage to health due to environmental pollution in Western countries is relatively modest in quantitative terms (especially when considering cancer and comparing such damage to the effects of some life-style exposures). However, a strictly quantitative approach, which ranks priorities according to the burden of disease attributable to single causes, is questionable because it does not consider such aspects as inequalities in the (...)
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  10. Paolo Vineis (1993). Definition and Classification of Cancer: Monothetic or Polythetic? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (3).
    Since the microbiological revolution, most infectious diseases have been defined and classified according to an etiologic criterion, i.e. the identification of single, external necessary causes (for example, Mycobacterium for tuberculosis). This is not the case with cancer. Not only external necessary causes of cancer have not been identified, but also the morphological classification cannot be based on univocal criteria. Although neoplasia and anaplasia appear to be universal attributes of cancer, these events are only quantitative. Neoplastic growth can be fast or (...)
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  11. Paolo Vineis (1991). Causality Assessment in Epidemiology. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (2).
    Epidemiology relies upon a broad interpretation of determinism. This paper discusses analogies with the evolution of the concept of cause in physics, and analyzes the classical nine criteria proposed by Sir Austin Bradford Hill for causal assessment. Such criteria fall into the categories of enumerative induction, eliminative induction, deduction and analogy. All of these four categories are necessary for causal assessment and there is no natural hierarchy among them, although a deductive analysis of the study design is preliminary to any (...)
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