Search results for 'Pathology' (try it on Scholar)

563 found
Order:
  1.  40
    Craig French, Pathology Based Philosophy of Mind. iCog.
    In this post the author defends a pathology based approach to the philosophy of mind.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  77
    James A. Woodbridge & Bradley Armour-Garb (2008). The Pathology of Validity. Synthese 160 (1):63 - 74.
    Stephen Read has presented an argument for the inconsistency of the concept of validity. We extend Read’s results and show that this inconsistency is but one half of a larger problem. Like the concept of truth, validity is infected with what we call semantic pathology, a condition that actually gives rise to two symptoms: inconsistency and indeterminacy. After sketching the basic ideas behind semantic pathology and explaining how it manifests both symptoms in the concept of truth, we present (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3.  33
    Samantha Matherne (2014). The Kantian Roots of Merleau-Ponty's Account of Pathology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (1):124-149.
    One of the more striking aspects of Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception (1945) is his use of psychological case studies in pathology. For Merleau-Ponty, a philosophical interpretation of phenomena like aphasia and psychic blindness promises to shed light not just on the nature of pathology, but on the nature of human existence more generally. In this paper, I show that although Merleau-Ponty is surely a pioneer in this use of pathology, his work is deeply indebted to an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Bradley Armour-Garb & James A. Woodbridge (2012). Liars, Truthtellers and Naysayers: A Broader View of Semantic Pathology I. Language and Communication 32 (4):293-311.
    Semantic pathology is most widely recognized in the liar paradox, where an apparent inconsistency arises in ‘‘liar sentences’’ and their ilk. But the phenomenon of semantic pathology also manifests a sibling symptom—an apparent indeterminacy—which, while not largely discussed (save for the occasional nod to ‘‘truthteller sentences’’), is just as pervasive as, and exactly parallels, the symptom of inconsistency. Moreover, certain ‘‘dual symptom’’ cases, which we call naysayers, exhibit both inconsistency and indeterminacy and also manifest a higher-order indeterminacy between (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  36
    Steven James Bartlett (1971). A Relativistic Theory of Phenomenological Constitution: A Self-Referential, Transcendental Approach to Conceptual Pathology. Dissertation, Universite de Paris X (Paris-Nanterre) (France)
    A RELATIVISTIC THEORY OF PHENOMENOLOCICAL CONSTITUTION: A SELF-REFERENTIAL, TRANSCENDENTAL APPROACH TO CONCEPTUAL PATHOLOGY. (Vol. I: French; Vol. II: English) -/- Steven James Bartlett -/- Doctoral dissertation director: Paul Ricoeur, Université de Paris Other doctoral committee members: Jean Ladrière and Alphonse de Waehlens, Université Catholique de Louvain Defended publically at the Université Catholique de Louvain, January, 1971. -/- Universite de Paris X (France), 1971. 797pp. -/- The principal objective of the work is to construct an analytically precise methodology which can (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  3
    Eisuke Sakakibara (forthcoming). Irrationality and Pathology of Beliefs. Neuroethics:1-11.
    Just as sadness is not always a symptom of mood disorder, irrational beliefs are not always symptoms of illness. Pathological irrational beliefs are distinguished from non-pathological ones by considering whether their existence is best explained by assuming some underlying dysfunctions. The features from which to infer the pathological nature of irrational beliefs are: un-understandability of their progression; uniqueness; coexistence with other psycho-physiological disturbances and/or concurrent decreased levels of functioning; bizarreness of content; preceding organic diseases known to be associated with irrational (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  84
    Josef Parnas (2004). Belief and Pathology of Self-Awareness: A Phenomenological Contribution to the Classification of Delusions. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (10-11):148-161.
    Delusions are usually defined as false beliefs about the state of affairs in the public world. Taking this premise as unquestionable, the debate in cognitive science tends to oscillate between the so-called 'rationalist approach'- proposing some breakdown in the central intellective modules embodying human rationality - and the 'empiricist approach' - proposing a primary peripheral deficit , followed by explanatory efforts in the form of delusions. In this article the foundational assumption about delusion is questioned. Especially in the case of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8.  5
    R. E. Holliman, J. D. Johnson & O. Adjei (2006). The Objective Assessment of International Collaboration Between Pathology Laboratories. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (1):1-7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  4
    Jaime Rodriguez‐Canales, Franziska C. Eberle, Elaine S. Jaffe & Michael R. Emmert‐Buck (2011). Why is It Crucial to Reintegrate Pathology Into Cancer Research? Bioessays 33 (7):490-498.
  10.  3
    Cecil W. Mann (1951). The Effects of Auditory-Vestibular Nerve Pathology on Space Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (6):450.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  5
    Bradley Armour-Garb & James A. Woodbridge (2015). Pretense and Pathology: Philosophical Fictionalism and its Applications. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Bradley Armour-Garb and James A. Woodbridge distinguish various species of fictionalism, locating and defending their own version of philosophical fictionalism. Addressing semantic and philosophical puzzles that arise from ordinary language, they consider such issues as the problem of non-being, plural identity claims, mental-attitude ascriptions, meaning attributions, and truth-talk. They consider 'deflationism about truth', explaining why deflationists should be fictionalists, and show how their philosophical fictionalist account of truth-talk underwrites a dissolution of the Liar Paradox and its kin. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Frank Stahnisch (2012). Medicine, Life and Function: Experimental Strategies and Medical Modernity at the Intersection of Pathology and Physiology. Project Verlag.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Joel Anderson (forthcoming). Autonomy Gaps as a Social Pathology: Ideologiekritik Beyond Paternalism. In Rainer Forst (ed.), Sozialphilosophie und Kritik. Suhrkamp
    From the outset, critical social theory has sought to diagnose people’s participation in their own oppression, by revealing the roots of irrational and self-undermining choices in the complex interplay between human nature, social structures, and cultural beliefs. As part of this project, Ideologiekritik has aimed to expose faulty conceptions of this interplay, so that the objectively pathological character of what people are “freely” choosing could come more clearly into view. The challenge, however, has always been to find a way of (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  90
    Bradley Armour-Garb & James A. Woodbridge (2006). Dialetheism, Semantic Pathology, and the Open Pair. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (3):395 – 416.
    Over the past 25 years, Graham Priest has ably presented and defended dialetheism, the view that certain sentences are properly characterized as true with true negations. Our goal here is neither to quibble with the tenability of true, assertable contradictions nor, really, with the arguments for dialetheism. Rather, we wish to address the dialetheist's treatment of cases of semantic pathology and to pose a worry for dialetheism that has not been adequately considered. The problem that we present seems to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  15.  73
    James A. Woodbridge & Bradley Armour-Garb (2005). Semantic Pathology and the Open Pair. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):695–703.
    In Vagueness and Contradiction (2001), Roy Sorensen defends and extends his epistemic account of vagueness. In the process, he appeals to connections between vagueness and semantic paradox. These appeals come mainly in Chapter 11, where Sorensen offers a solution to what he calls the no-no paradox—a “neglected cousin” of the more famous liar—and attempts to use this solution as a precedent for an epistemic account of the sorites paradox. This strategy is problematic for Sorensen’s project, however, since, as we establish, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  16.  43
    G. Loek J. Schönbeck (2012). Is Pathology Dysfunctional? Philosophy of Management 11 (3):47-65.
    An enterprising odyssey might be one way to investigate whether a unique role is afforded to ‘a’ philosophy of management. The question is, first, which philosophy is at stake and what finery such a philosophy might bear. Second, three cardinal questions arise: (1) “What can we say about it?“; (2) “How do we know we can or cannot say something about it?“; and (3) “What is its relation to rationality?” Third, by an old scepticist tradition one may choose tantalising innersubjects (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  39
    Sara Moghaddam-Taaheri (2011). Understanding Pathology in the Context of Physiological Mechanisms: The Practicality of a Broken-Normal View. Biology and Philosophy 26 (4):603-611.
    The topic of disease mechanisms is of clinical importance, as our understanding of such mechanisms plays an important role in how we approach devising treatments for disease. In this paper, I critique an argument made by Mauro Nervi, in which he asserts that pathology is often better viewed in the context of distinct theoretical mechanisms. I use this critique as a starting point to argue that viewing pathology as a broken-normal, malfunctioning mechanism is more therapeutically practical and more (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  18.  34
    D. Tulodziecki (2011). A Case Study in Explanatory Power: John Snow's Conclusions About the Pathology and Transmission of Cholera. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (3):306-316.
    In the mid-1800s, there was much debate about the origin or 'exciting cause' of cholera. Despite much confusion surrounding the disease, the so-called miasma theory emerged as the prevalent account about cholera's cause. Going against this mainstream view, the British physician John Snow inferred several things about cholera's origin and pathology that no one else inferred. Without observing the vibrio cholerae, however,-data unavailable to Snow and his colleagues-, there was no way of settling the question of what exactly was (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19.  41
    G. Meynen & G. Widdershoven (2012). Competence in Health Care: An Abilities-Based Versus a Pathology-Based Approach. Clinical Ethics 7 (1):39-44.
    Competence is central to informed consent and, therefore, to medical practice. In this context, competence is regarded as synonymous with decision-making capacity. There is wide consensus that competence should be approached conceptually by identifying the abilities needed for decision-making capacity. Incompetence, then, is understood as a condition in which certain abilities relevant to decision-making capacity are lacking. This approach has been helpful both in theory and practice. There is, however, another approach to incompetence, namely to relate it to mental disorder. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  44
    G. Loek J. Schönbeck (2012). Is Pathology Dysfunctional? Philosophy of Management 11 (3):47-65.
    An enterprising odyssey might be one way to investigate whether a unique role is afforded to ‘a’ philosophy of management. The question is, first, which philosophy is at stake and what finery such a philosophy might bear. Second, three cardinal questions arise: (1) “What can we say about it?“; (2) “How do we know we can or cannot say something about it?“; and (3) “What is its relation to rationality?” Third, by an old scepticist tradition one may choose tantalising innersubjects (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  11
    G. Loek J. Schönbeck (2012). Is Pathology Dysfunctional? Philosophy of Management 11 (3):47-65.
    An enterprising odyssey might be one way to investigate whether a unique role is afforded to ‘a’ philosophy of management. The question is, first, which philosophy is at stake and what finery such a philosophy might bear. Second, three cardinal questions arise: (1) “What can we say about it?“; (2) “How do we know we can or cannot say something about it?“; and (3) “What is its relation to rationality?” Third, by an old scepticist tradition one may choose tantalising innersubjects (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  62
    Günther Anders (2009). The Pathology of Freedom: An Essay on Non-Identification. Deleuze Studies 3 (2):278-310.
    In the twenty-second series of The Logic of Sense, Gilles Deleuze references a remarkable essay by Günther (Stern) Anders. Anders’ essay, translated here as ‘The Pathology of Freedom’, addresses the sickness and health of our negotiation with the negative anthropological condition of ‘not being cut out for the world’.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  36
    Justin Garson, Broken Mechanisms: Function, Pathology, and Natural Selection.
    The following describes one distinct sense of ‘mechanism’ which is prevalent in biology and biomedicine and which has important epistemic benefits. According to this sense, mechanisms are defined by the functions they facilitate. This construal has two important implications. Firstly, mechanisms that facilitate functions are capable of breaking. Secondly, on this construal, there are rigid constraints on the sorts of phenomena ‘for which’ there can be a mechanism. In this sense, there are no ‘mechanisms for’ pathology, and natural selection (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  13
    G. Loek J. Schönbeck (2012). Is Pathology Dysfunctional? Philosophy of Management 11 (3):47-65.
    An enterprising odyssey might be one way to investigate whether a unique role is afforded to ‘a’ philosophy of management. The question is, first, which philosophy is at stake and what finery such a philosophy might bear. Second, three cardinal questions arise: (1) “What can we say about it?“; (2) “How do we know we can or cannot say something about it?“; and (3) “What is its relation to rationality?” Third, by an old scepticist tradition one may choose tantalising innersubjects (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  10
    O. Parnes (2003). 'Trouble From Within': Allergy, Autoimmunity, and Pathology in the First Half of the Twentieth Century. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (3):425-454.
    Traditionally, autoimmune disease has been considered to be a case of false recognition; the immune system mistakenly identifies 'self' tissues as foreign, attacking them thus causing damage and malady. Accordingly, the history of autoimmunity is usually told as part ot the history of immunology, that is, of theories and experiments relating to the ability of the immune system to discriminate between self and nonself. This paper challenges this view, claiming that the emergence of the notion of autoimmunity in the 1950s (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26.  31
    Bjorn Merker (2006). Ritual Pathology and the Nature of Ritual Culture. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):624-625.
    Boyer & Lienard's (B&L's) biological model of ritual achieves a rather straightforward account of features shared by ritual pathology and the idiosyncratic rituals of children; but complexities accrue in extending it to human ritual culture generally. My commentary suggests that the ritual cultural traditions of animals such as songbirds share structural features, handicap-based origin, as well as the enabling neural mechanism of vocal learning with human ritual culture. (Published Online February 8 2007).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  8
    Chad Kautzer (2014). Self-Defensive Subjectivity The Diagnosis of a Social Pathology. Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (8):743-756.
    In his book Das Recht der Freiheit (2011), Axel Honneth develops a theory of social justice that incorporates negative, reflexive and social forms of freedom as well as the institutional conditions necessary for their reproduction. This account enables the identification of social pathologies or systemic normative deficits that frustrate individual efforts to relate their actions reflexively to a normative order and inhibits their ability to recognize the freedom of others as a condition of their own. In this article I utilize (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  6
    Ashley Taylor (2015). The Discourse of Pathology: Reproducing the Able Mind Through Bodies of Color. Hypatia 30 (1):181-198.
    The growing field of feminist disability studies explores how human bodies are interpreted through cultural values and expectations surrounding physical and mental ability. This paper contributes to and expands upon this conversation by examining how the ideal of “able-mindedness” functions to maintain racial divisions and inequalities through attributions of cognitive and psychiatric disability to bodies of color. Drawing upon contemporary examples from popular social media, public policy, and academic discourse, the author shows how racialized and nonnormatively gendered bodies are identified (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  4
    Robert F. Bornstein (2010). The Rocky Road From Axis I to Axis II: Extending the Network Model of Diagnostic Comorbidity to Personality Pathology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):151-152.
    Although the network model represents a promising new approach to conceptualizing comorbidity in psychiatric diagnosis, the model applies most directly to Axis I symptom disorders; the degree to which the model generalizes to Axis II disorders remains open to question. This commentary addresses that issue, discussing opportunities and challenges in applying the network model to DSM-diagnosed personality pathology.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  8
    Mika Pantzar, Risto Tainio & Kari Lilja (1993). Progress and Pathology in Managerial Practice: An Evolutionary Perspective. World Futures 37 (2):151-161.
    (1993). Progress and pathology in managerial practice: An evolutionary perspective. World Futures: Vol. 37, The Evolution of Socio-Economic Systems, pp. 151-161.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  5
    Edwin E. Gantt (2001). Review of Pathology and the Postmodern: Mental Illness as Discourse and Experience. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):91-92.
    Reviews the book, Pathology and the postmodern: Mental illness as discourse and experience by Dwight Fee . This provocative collection of short essays, edited and assembled by Dwight Fee, constitutes yet another useful addition to SAGE Publications’ Inquiries in Social Construction series . Including the work of such postmodern and social constructionist thinkers as Kenneth Gergen, Mark Freeman, Vivian Burr, Jane Ussher, Simon Gottschalk, Steven Sabat and Rom Harré, this anthology sets out to explore the relationship between mental distress (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  26
    Erich Fromm (2010). The Pathology of Normalcy: Its Genius for Good and Evil. American Mental Health Foundation Books.
    Modern man's pathology of normalcy -- The concept of mental health -- Humanistic science of man -- Is man lazy by nature?.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. David Knight (2002). Raw Material: Producing Pathology in Victorian Culture. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:137-138.
    Readers expecting a history of nineteenth‐century pathology are in for a surprise. They will find instead a self‐conscious example of cultural studies, critical of some assumptions made in this field and of some feminist writing, but containing some alarming sentences like “My goal has been to give shape to the accidental palimpsests of an inveterately verbal, and increasingly visual, culture; to assemble a particular series of hermeneutic loose ends into a coherent account of how an extraordinarily bizarre system of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. P. Ondrejkovic (2001). Social Pathology, or Social Deviation? Filozofia 56 (6):398-413.
    For denoting ill, abnormal, generally undesirable social phenomena the term social pathology is most often accepted. It embodies also the sanctioned forms of deviant behaviour and the study of the causal relations of their origin and existence. The difficulty with delimitating precisely what is pathological stems from the fact that we are not able to give a satisfactory definition of the normal. The normal cannot be identified with the mediocrity. The paper supports the view that the normality is opposite (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Andrea Goulet (2005). The Yellow Spot: Ocular Pathology and Empirical Method in Gaston Leroux's Le Mystere de la Chambre Jaune. Substance 34 (2):27-46.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Victoria Margree (2002). Normal and Abnormal: Georges Canguilhem and the Question of Mental Pathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (4):299-312.
  37. Wolfram Hinzen (forthcoming). The Linguistics of Schizophrenia: Thought Disturbance as Language Pathology Across Positive Symptoms. Frontiers in Psychology.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38. Peter Keating & Alberto Cambrosio (2004). Does Biomedicine Entail the Successful Reduction of Pathology to Biology? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (3):357-371.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  39. Mike Gane (2002). Normativity and Pathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (4):313-316.
  40.  5
    Stan Klein (2016). Lost Feeling of Ownership of One’s Mental States: The Importance of Situating Patient R.B.'s Pathology in the Context of Contemporary Theory and Empiricism. Philosophical Psychology 29 (4):490-493.
    In her re-analysis of the evidence presented in Klein and Nichols (2012) to support their argument that patient R.B. temporarily lost possessory custody of consciously apprehended objects (in this case, objects that normally would be non-inferentially taken as episodic memory), Professor Roache concludes Klein and Nichols's claims are untenable. I argue that Professor Roache is incorrect in her re-interpretation, and that this is due, in part, to lack of sufficient familiarity with psychological theory on memory as well as clinical literature (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  85
    M. Crawcour & F. Azouvi (1981). Woman as a Model of Pathology in the Eighteenth Century. Diogenes 29 (115):22-36.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Rory J. Conces (2005). A Sisyphean Tale: The Pathology of Ethnic Nationalism and the Pedagogy of Forging Humane Democracies in the BALKans. Studies in East European Thought 57 (2):139 - 184.
  43. Victoria Margree (2002). Canguilhem and Social Pathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (4):317-319.
  44.  2
    John C. Marshall & Freda Newcombe (1981). Lexical Access: A Perspective From Pathology. Cognition 10 (1-3):209-214.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   29 citations  
  45.  8
    Sara Brill (2016). Political Pathology in Plato’s Republic. Apeiron 49 (2).
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  59
    J. Eric Oliver (2006). The Politics of Pathology: How Obesity Became an Epidemic Disease. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (4):611-627.
  47.  90
    Marina Frasca-Spada (2001). Philosophical Melancholy and Delirium: Hume's Pathology of Philosophy. Donald W. Livingston. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (439):783-789.
  48.  2
    Todd E. Feinberg, John Deluca, J. T. Giacino, D. M. Roane & M. Solms (2005). Right Hemisphere Pathology and the Self: Delusional Misidentification and Reduplication. In Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan (eds.), The Lost Self: Pathologies of the Brain and Identity. Oxford University Press
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  49.  14
    Charles E. Scott (1986). The Pathology of the Father's Rule. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 61 (1):118-130.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Peter Gilroy (1999). The Aims of Education and The Philosophy of Education: The Pathology of an Argument. In Roger Marples (ed.), The Aims of Education. Routledge
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 563