Search results for 'Patient Advocacy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Inken Annegret Emrich, Leyla Fröhlich-Güzelsoy, Florian Bruns, Bernd Friedrich & Andreas Frewer (2014). Clinical Ethics and Patient Advocacy. HEC Forum 26 (2):111-124.score: 144.0
    In recent years, the rights of patients have assumed a more pivotal role in international discussion. Stricter laws on the protection of patients place greater priority on the perspective and the status of patients. The purpose of this study is to emphasize ethical aspects in communication, the role of patient advocates as contacts for the concerns and suggestions of patients, and how many problems of ethics disappear when communication is highlighted. We reviewed 680 documented cases of consultation in a (...)
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  2. Lisa M. Rasmussen (2012). Patient Advocacy in Clinical Ethics Consultation. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):1 - 9.score: 120.0
    The question of whether clinical ethics consultants may engage in patient advocacy in the course of consultation has not been addressed, but it highlights for the field that consultants? allegiances, and the boundaries of appropriate professional practice, must be better understood. I consider arguments for and against patient advocacy in clinical ethics consultation, which demonstrate that patient advocacy is permissible, but not central to the practice of consultation. I then offer four recommendations for consultants (...)
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  3. Nancy S. Jecker (1990). Integrating Medical Ethics with Normative Theory: Patient Advocacy and Social Responsibility. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (2).score: 120.0
    It is often assumed that the chief responsibility medical professionals bear is patient care and advocacy. The meeting of other duties, such as ensuring a more just distribution of medical resources and promoting the public good, is not considered a legitimate basis for curtailing or slackening beneficial patient services. It is argued that this assumption is often made without sufficient attention to foundational principles of professional ethics; that once core principles are laid bare this assumption is revealed (...)
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  4. Margaret Mahlin (2010). Individual Patient Advocacy, Collective Responsibility and Activism Within Professional Nursing Associations. Nursing Ethics 17 (2):247-254.score: 120.0
    The systemic difficulties of health care in the USA have brought to light another issue in nurse—patient advocacy — those who require care yet have inadequate or non-existent access. Patient advocacy has focused on individual nurses who in turn advocate for individual patients, yet, while supporting individual patients is a worthy goal of patient advocacy, systemic problems cannot be adequately addressed in this way. The difficulties nurses face when advocating for patients is well documented (...)
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  5. Susannah L. Rose (2013). Patient Advocacy Organizations: Institutional Conflicts of Interest, Trust, and Trustworthiness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):680-687.score: 120.0
    Patient advocacy organizations (PAOs) advocate for increased research funding and policy changes and provide services to patients and their families. Given their credibility and political clout, PAOs are often successful in changing policies, increasing research funding, and increasing public awareness of medical conditions and the problems of their constituents. In order to advance their missions, PAOs accept funding, frequently from pharmaceutical firms. Industry funding can help PAOs advance their goals but can also create conflicts of interest (COI). Research (...)
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  6. Sandra C. Sellin (1995). Out On a Limb: A Qualitative Study of Patient Advocacy in Institutional Nursing. Nursing Ethics 2 (1):19-29.score: 120.0
    This study explored the nature of patient advocacy among 40 institutionally employed registered nurses, nurse managers, clinical nurse specialists and nursing administrators. Participants were asked to define patient advocacy, to discuss their experiences with advocacy in institutions and their perceptions of risk associated with advocacy in institutional settings, and to identify one concept central to patient advocacy. The results delineated conceptual definitions of advocacy and numerous factors that influence nurses' decisions about (...)
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  7. Jennifer Welchman & Glenn G. Griener (2005). Patient Advocacy and Professional Associations: Individual and Collective Responsibilities. Nursing Ethics 12 (3):296-304.score: 120.0
    Professions have traditionally treated advocacy as a collective duty, best assigned to professional associations to perform. In North American nursing, advocacy for issues affecting identifiable patients is assigned instead to their nurses. We argue that nursing associations’ withdrawal from advocacy for patient care issues is detrimental to nurses and patients alike. Most nurses work in large institutions whose internal policies they cannot influence. When these create obstacles to good care, the inability of nurses to affect change (...)
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  8. Reza Negarandeh, Fateme Oskouie, Fazlollah Ahmadi & Mansoure Nikravesh (2008). The Meaning of Patient Advocacy for Iranian Nurses. Nursing Ethics 15 (4):457-467.score: 120.0
    Patient advocacy has been a topic of much discussion in the nursing literature for a number of decades. Ambiguities remain, however, concerning definitions of advocacy in nursing. This qualitative grounded theory-type study aimed to inquire into the meaning of patient advocacy from Iranian nurses' perspective. A purposive sample of 24 nurses (staff nurses, head nurses and supervisors) working in a large university hospital in Tehran was used. Data were collected using in-depth semistructured interviews and reflective (...)
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  9. Deirdre Hyland (2002). An Exploration of the Relationship Between Patient Autonomy and Patient Advocacy: Implications for Nursing Practice. Nursing Ethics 9 (5):472-482.score: 114.0
    The purpose of this article is to examine whether patient/client autonomy is always compatible with the nurse’s role of advocacy. The author looks separately at the concepts of autonomy and advocacy, and considers them in relation to the reality of clinical practice from professional, ethical and legal perspectives. Considerable ambiguity is found regarding the legitimacy of claims of a unique function for nurses to act as patient advocates. To act as an advocate may put nurses at (...)
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  10. Sigurd Lauridsen (2009). Administrative Gatekeeping – a Third Way Between Unrestricted Patient Advocacy and Bedside Rationing. Bioethics 23 (5):311-320.score: 102.0
    The inevitable need for rationing of healthcare has apparently presented the medical profession with the dilemma of choosing the lesser of two evils. Physicians appear to be obliged to adopt either an implausible version of traditional professional ethics or an equally problematic ethics of bedside rationing. The former requires unrestricted advocacy of patients but prompts distrust, moral hazard and unfairness. The latter commits physicians to rationing at the bedside; but it is bound to introduce unfair inequalities among patients and (...)
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  11. A. W. Bird (1994). Enhancing Patient Well-Being: Advocacy or Negotiation? Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (3):152-156.score: 96.0
    The United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visitors (UKCC) document, Exercising Accountability, states that the role of patient's advocate is an essential aspect of good professional nursing practice (1). The author examines the case for and against the nurse being the best person to act as advocate, and critically evaluates the criteria of advocacy. The problematic moral issues arising are discussed, and a case made for negotiation between the members of the multidisciplinary team and the (...)
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  12. Anne J. Davis, Emiko Konishi & Marie Tashiro (2003). A Pilot Study of Selected Japanese Nurses' Ideas on Patient Advocacy. Nursing Ethics 10 (4):404-413.score: 96.0
    This pilot study had two purposes: (1) to review recent Japanese nursing literature on nursing advocacy; and (2) to obtain data from nurses on advocacy. For the second purpose, 24 nurses at a nursing college in Japan responded to a questionnaire. The concept of advocacy, taken from the West, has become an ethical ideal for Japanese nurses but one that they do not always understand, or, if they do, they find it difficult to fulfil. They cite nursing (...)
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  13. Mary Brewer Love (1995). Patient Advocacy At the End of Life. Nursing Ethics 2 (1):3-9.score: 96.0
    Caring for the competent, fragile, elderly patient at the end of life is becoming increasingly challenging. This case explores several ethical areas of concern that arise when caring for patients who have written durable powers of attorney for health care decisions and face life or death choices. Areas covered are informed consent with the elderly patient, the family's right to be involved in decision-making, futility of treatment, and the nurse's role as patient advocate during times of difficult (...)
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  14. Cosby G. Arnold (forthcoming). Two Faces of Patient Advocacy: The Current Controversy in Newborn Screening. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101019.score: 92.0
    Newborn screening programmes began in the 1960s, have traditionally been conducted without parental permission and have grown dramatically in the last decade. Whether these programmes serve patients’ best interests has recently become a point of controversy. Privacy advocates, concerned that newborn screening infringes upon individual liberties, are demanding fundamental changes to these programmes. These include parental permission and limiting the research on the blood samples obtained, an agenda at odds with the viewpoints of newborn screening advocates. This essay presents the (...)
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  15. Andrew Edgar (2013). The Dominance of Big Pharma: Power. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):295-304.score: 90.0
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a normative model for the assessment of the exercise of power by Big Pharma. By drawing on the work of Steven Lukes, it will be argued that while Big Pharma is overtly highly regulated, so that its power is indeed restricted in the interests of patients and the general public, the industry is still able to exercise what Lukes describes as a third dimension of power. This entails concealing the conflicts of interest (...)
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  16. Stella Reiter-Theil (2003). Balancing the Perspectives. The Patient's Role in Clinical Ethics Consultation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):247-254.score: 90.0
    The debate and implementation of Clinical Ethics Consultation (CEC) is still in its beginnings in Europe and the issue of the patient's perspective has been neglected so far, especially at the theoretical and methodological level. At the practical level, recommendations about the involvement of the patient or his/her relatives are missing, reflecting the general lack of quality and practice standards in CEC. Balance of perspectives is a challenge in any interpersonal consultation, which has led to great efforts to (...)
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  17. Rebecca Dresser (2001). Beyond Disability: Bioethics and Patient Advocacy. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (3):50-51.score: 90.0
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  18. Mark Yarborough & Richard R. Sharp (2006). Bioethics Consultation and Patient Advocacy Organizations: Expanding the Dialogue About Professional Conflicts of Interest. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (01):74-81.score: 90.0
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  19. William Lawrence Allen & Ray Edward Moseley (2012). Will the Last Health Care Professional to Forgo Patient Advocacy Please Call an Ethics Consult? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):19 - 20.score: 90.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 8, Page 19-20, August 2012.
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  20. Anna Josse Eklund, Marie Jossebo, Ann-Kristin Sandin-Bojö, Bodil Wilde-Larsson & Kerstin Petzäll (forthcoming). Swedish Nurses' Perceptions of Influencers on Patient Advocacy–a Phenomenographic Study. Nursing Ethics.score: 90.0
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  21. L. Schwartz (2002). Is There an Advocate in the House? The Role of Health Care Professionals in Patient Advocacy. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (1):37-40.score: 90.0
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  22. Tom O.’Connor & Billy Kelly (2005). Bridging the Gap: A Study of General Nurses' Perceptions of Patient Advocacy in Ireland. Nursing Ethics 12 (5):453-467.score: 90.0
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  23. A. Josse-Eklund, M. Jossebo, A. -K. Sandin-Bojo, B. Wilde-Larsson & K. Petzall (forthcoming). Swedish Nurses' Perceptions of Influencers on Patient Advocacy. Nursing Ethics.score: 90.0
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  24. Rebecca Dresser (2001). [Book Review] When Science Offers Salvation, Patient Advocacy and Research Ethics. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 31 (6):47-48.score: 90.0
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  25. Susan Foster (2010). The Role of Patients and Patient Advocacy Groups in Educating Patients on the Importance of Legitimate Scientific Research. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (5):49-49.score: 90.0
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  26. Lisa M. Rasmussen (2012). Advocacy Through a Prism: A Response to Commentaries on “Patient Advocacy in Clinical Ethics Consultation”. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):W1 - W3.score: 90.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 8, Page W1-W3, August 2012.
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  27. R. Gillon (1998). Persistent Vegetative State, Withdrawal of Artificial Nutrition and Hydration, and the Patient's "Best Interests". Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (2):75-76.score: 78.0
  28. Charlotte Williamson (2010). Towards the Emancipation of Patients: Patients' Experiences and the Patient Movement. Policy Press.score: 78.0
     
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  29. Lance S. Rintamaki, Elaine Hsieh & Jennifer Peterson (2006). Pragma-Dialectics and Self-Advocacy in Physician-Patient Interactions. In F. H. van Eemeren, Peter Houtlosser, Haft-van Rees & A. M. (eds.), Considering Pragma-Dialectics: A Festschrift for Frans H. L. Erlbaum Associates. 23.score: 72.0
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  30. A. J. Fenwick (1998). Applying Best Interests to Persistent Vegetative State--A Principled Distortion? Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (2):86-92.score: 66.0
    "Best interests" is widely accepted as the appropriate foundation principle for medico-legal decisions concerning treatment withdrawal from patients in persistent vegetative state (PVS). Its application appears to progress logically from earlier use regarding legally incompetent patients. This author argues, however, that such confidence in the relevance of the principle of best interests to PVS is misplaced, and that current construction in this context is questionable on four specific grounds. Furthermore, it is argued that the resulting legal inconsistency is distorting both (...)
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  31. Richard Martinez (2002). The Nature of Illness Experience: A Course on Boundaries. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (3):259-269.score: 66.0
    With the Accreditation Council for GraduateMedical Education''s designation of professionalism as one of six corecompetencies in residency medical education,some educators of residents and medicalstudents believe that the concept ofprofessional role is too restrictive and narrowfor grappling with the complex dynamics ofprofessional–patient relationships. The ethicalquandaries of abortion and physician assistedsuicide illustrate how individual personalvalues cannot be ignored in the dynamicrelationship between health care professionaland patient. This article describes a medicalschool course where students are paired with patient mentors. Within (...)
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  32. Jeanne Fitzpatrick (2010). A Better Way of Dying: How to Make the Best Choices at the End of Life. Penguin Books.score: 66.0
    Foreword -- Prologue -- Attorney Eileen Fitzpatrick -- Dr. Jeanne Fitzpatrick -- section 1. Death and dying in America -- 1. The need for change : the cautionary tale of Phyllis Shattuck -- Dr. Fitzpatrick tells Phyllis Shattuck's story -- Reflections -- How this book will help -- Lessons to learn -- New name, old concept -- 2. Your right to die -- Your right to die is born : the case of Karen Ann Quinlan -- The Supreme Court weights (...)
     
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  33. E. G. Howe (2008). Increasing Consensus with Patients and Their Loved Ones. Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (1):3-12.score: 66.0
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  34. Reuben G. Sass (2014). Bringing Prosocial Values to Translational, Disease-Specific Stem Cell Research. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):16.score: 66.0
    Disease-specific stem cell therapies, created from induced pluripotent stem cell lines containing the genetic defects responsible for a particular disease, have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of refractory chronic diseases. Given their capacity to differentiate into any human cell type, these cell lines might be reprogrammed to correct a disease-causing genetic defect in any tissue or organ, in addition to offering a more clinically realistic model for testing new drugs and studying disease mechanisms. Clinical translation of these therapies provides (...)
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  35. Thomas May (2002). Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 62.0
    Issues concerning patients' rights are at the center of bioethics, but the political basis for these rights has rarely been examined. In Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making , Thomas May offers a compelling analysis of how the political context of liberal constitutional democracy shapes the rights and obligations of both patients and health care professionals. May focuses on how a key feature of liberal society -- namely, an individual's right to make independent decisions (...)
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  36. Helen McCabe (2007). Nursing Involvement in Euthanasia: How Sound is the Philosophical Support? Nursing Philosophy 8 (3):167-175.score: 60.0
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  37. A. J. Fenwick (1999). Best Interests in Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):59-60.score: 60.0
  38. E. G. Howe & C. Howe (2007). Three Keys to Treating Inmates and Their Application in Ethics Consultation. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (3):195-203.score: 60.0
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  39. Nan Gaylord & Pamela Grace (1995). Nursing Advocacy: An Ethic of Practice. Nursing Ethics 2 (1):11-18.score: 48.0
    Advocacy is an important concept in nursing practice; it is frequently used to describe th nurse-client relationship. The term advocacy, however, is subject to ambiguity of interpretation. Such ambiguity was evidenced recently in criticisms levelled at the nursing profession by hospital ethicist Ellen Bernal. She reproached nursing for using 'patient rights advocate' as a viable role for nurses. We maintain that, for nursing, patient advocacy may encompass, but is not limited to, patient rights (...). Patient advocacy is not merely the defence of infringements of patient rights. Advocacy for nursing stems from a philosophy of nursing in which nursing practice is the support of an individual to promote his or her own well-being, as understood by that individual. It is an ethic of practice. La défense des malades joue un grand rôle dans la pratique des infirmiers/ères. Le terme est souvent utilisé pour définir les rapports entre malades et soignants. Le mot 'defénse' pourtant, peut être mal compris. Une ambiguïté était évidente récemment dans la critique de la profession infirmière faite par la philosophe éthique Ellen Bernal. Elle reproche à la profession d'utiliser le terme 'avocat des droits des malades' pour désigner le rôle primordial des infirmiers/ères. Nous croyons que pour les soignants, la défense des malades peut comprendre le rôle 'd'avocat des droits des malades' mais elle ne s'y borne pas. La défense n'est pas limitée à la défense des infractions des droits des malades. La défense dans la profession infirmière est basée sur une philosophie où la pratique infirmière est le soutien des malades dans leur quête de promouvoir leur propre bien-être. Die Fürsprache spielt eine wichtige Rolle in der Krankenpflege. Sie wird oft als kennzeichnend für die Beziehung zwischen Patient und Pflegepersonal beschrieben. Der Ausdruck 'Fürsprache' kann aber auch mehrdeutig interpretiert werden. Das wurde letzthin in der Kritik der Ethikerin Ellen Bernal an der Krankenpflege sichtbar. Sie machte den Pflegenden den Vorwurf, dass sie sich die Rolle des 'Rechts-Advokat des Patienten' aneignen. Wir sind der Meinung, dass es die Aufgabe des Pflegepersonals ist, auch die Rechte der Patienten zu vertreten, aber dass das nur ein Teil der Fürsprache ist. Sie ist nicht nur Verteidignung von verletzten Patientenrechten. Die Fürsprache in der Krankenpflege stammt von einer Philosophie, deren Ausübung die Unterstützung der Patienten für ihr Wohlergehen zum Ziel hat, so wie die Patienten selbst ihr Wohlergehen verstehen. Sie ist eine Ethik der Tat. (shrink)
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  40. Insaf Altun & Nermin Ersoy (2003). Undertaking the Role of Patient Advocate: A Longitudinal Study of Nursing Students. Nursing Ethics 10 (5):462-471.score: 48.0
    Patient advocacy has been claimed as a new role for professional nurses and many codes of ethics for nurses state that they act as patient advocates. Nursing education is faced with the challenge of preparing nurses for this role. In this article we describe the results of a study that considered the tendencies of a cohort of nursing students at the Kocaeli University School of Nursing to act as advocates and to respect patients’ rights, and how their (...)
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  41. Robert G. Hanks (2010). Development and Testing of an Instrument to Measure Protective Nursing Advocacy. Nursing Ethics 17 (2):255-267.score: 48.0
    Patient advocacy is an important aspect of nursing care, yet there are few instruments to measure this essential function. This study was conducted to develop, determine the psychometric properties, and support validity of the Protective Nursing Advocacy Scale (PNAS), which measures nursing advocacy beliefs and actions from a protective perspective. The study used a descriptive correlational design with a systematically selected sample of 419 medical-surgical registered nurses. Analysis of the 43-item instrument was conducted using principal components (...)
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  42. J. Snyder, V. A. Crooks, K. Adams, P. Kingsbury & R. Johnston (2011). The 'Patient's Physician One-Step Removed': The Evolving Roles of Medical Tourism Facilitators. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (9):530-534.score: 42.0
    Background: Medical tourism involves patients travelling internationally to receive medical services. This practice raises a range of ethical issues, including potential harms to the patient's home and destination country and risks to the patient's own health. Medical tourists often engage the services of a facilitator who may book travel and accommodation and link the patient with a hospital abroad. Facilitators have the potential to exacerbate or mitigate the ethical concerns associated with medical tourism, but their roles are (...)
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  43. C. Pavlish, A. Ho & A. -M. Rounkle (2012). Health and Human Rights Advocacy: Perspectives From a Rwandan Refugee Camp. Nursing Ethics 19 (4):538-549.score: 42.0
    Working at the bedside and within communities as patient advocates, nurses frequently intervene to advance individuals’ health and well-being. However, the International Council of Nurses’ Code of Ethics asserts that nurses should expand beyond the individual model and also promote a rights-enabling environment where respect for human dignity is paramount. This article applies the results of an ethnographic human rights study with displaced populations in Rwanda to argue for a rights-based social advocacy role for nurses. Human rights (...) strategies include sensitization, participation, protection, good governance, and accountability. By adopting a rights-based approach to advocacy, nurses contribute to health agendas that include more just social relationships, equitable access to opportunities, and health-positive living situations for all persons. (shrink)
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  44. Courtenay R. Bruce & Mary A. Majumder (2014). The “Permanent” Patient Problem. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (1):88-92.score: 42.0
    Patients who enter the health care system for acute care may become “permanent” patients of the hospital when a lack of resources precludes discharge to the next level of post-acute care. Legal, professional, and ethical norms prohibit physician and acute care hospital “dumping” of these patients. However, limitless use of hospital resources for indefinite stays is untenable. In the absence of hospital policy addressing this specific issue, the availability of financial support will be determined by health care professionals' willingness to (...)
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  45. Anne H. Simmonds (2008). Autonomy and Advocacy in Perinatal Nursing Practice. Nursing Ethics 15 (3):360-370.score: 42.0
    Advocacy has been positioned as an ideal within the practice of nursing, with national guidelines and professional standards obliging nurses to respect patients' autonomous choices and to act as their advocates. However, the meaning of advocacy and autonomy is not well defined or understood, leading to uncertainty regarding what is required, expected and feasible for nurses in clinical practice. In this article, a feminist ethics perspective is used to examine how moral responsibilities are enacted in the perinatal nurse— (...) relationship and to explore the interaction between the various threads that influence, and are in turn affected by, this relationship. This perspective allows for consideration of contextual and relational factors that impact on the way perinatal nursing care is given and received, and provides a framework for exploring the ways in which patient autonomy, advocacy and choice are experienced by childbearing women and their nurses during labour and birth. (shrink)
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  46. Robert G. Hanks (2008). The Lived Experience of Nursing Advocacy. Nursing Ethics 15 (4):468-477.score: 42.0
    Nursing advocacy for patients is considered to be an essential component of nursing practice. This phenomenological qualitative pilot study explored registered nurses' lived experience of nursing advocacy with patients using a sample of three medical-surgical registered nurses. The guiding research questions were: (1) how do registered nurses practicing in the medical-surgical specialty area describe their experiences with nursing advocacy for their patients; and (2) what reflections on educational preparation for their professional roles do registered nurses identify as (...)
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  47. A. Owen-Smith, J. Coast & J. Donovan (2010). Are Patients Receiving Enough Information About Healthcare Rationing? A Qualitative Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (2):88-92.score: 36.0
    Background There is broad international agreement from clinicians and academics that healthcare rationing should be undertaken as explicitly as possible, and the BMA have publicly supported the call for more accountable priority setting for some time. However, studies in the UK and elsewhere suggest that clinicians experience a number of barriers to rationing openly, and the information needs of patients at the point of provision are largely unknown. Methodology In-depth interviews were undertaken with NHS professionals working at the community level (...)
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  48. D. Strech, M. Synofzik & G. Marckmann (2008). How Physicians Allocate Scarce Resources at the Bedside: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (1):80-99.score: 30.0
    Although rationing of scarce health-care resources is inevitable in clinical practice, there is still limited and scattered information about how physicians perceive and execute this bedside rationing (BSR) and how it can be performed in an ethically fair way. This review gives a systematic overview on physicians’ perspectives on influences, strategies, and consequences of health-care rationing. Relevant references as identified by systematically screening major electronic databases and manuscript references were synthesized by thematic analysis. Retrieved studies focused on themes that fell (...)
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  49. B. Svedberg, T. Hällström & K. Lützén (2000). The Morality of Treating Patients with Depot Neuroleptics: The Experience of Community Psychiatric Nurses. Nursing Ethics 7 (1):35-46.score: 30.0
    The aim of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of the meaning that community psychiatric nurses impart to their everyday interactions with patients in depot neuroleptic treatment situations. Nine experienced community psychiatric nurses were interviewed using semistructured, open-ended questions. Data analysis was by the phenomenological descriptive method according to Giorgi. Four themes were identified, highlighting aspects of the moral meaning of treating patients with depot neuroleptics: (1) ‘benevolent justification’ occurs when nurses perceive that the patient’s welfare is (...)
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  50. Marc A. Rodwin (2013). INTRODUCTION: Institutional Corruption and the Pharmaceutical Policy. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):544-552.score: 30.0
    Today, the goals of pharmaceutical policy and medical practice are often undermined due to institutional corruption — that is, widespread or systemic practices, usually legal, that undermine an institution's objectives or integrity. In this symposium, 16 articles investigate the corruption of pharmaceutical policy, each taking a different look at the sources of corruption, how it occurs, and what is corrupted. We will see that the pharmaceutical industry's own purposes are often undermined. Furthermore, pharmaceutical industry funding of election campaigns and lobbying (...)
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