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  1. Patricia A. Marshall (forthcoming). Research Ethics in Applied Anthropology. Irb.
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  2. Patricia A. Marshall, Clement A. Adebamowo, Adebowale A. Adeyemo, Temidayo O. Ogundiran, Teri Strenski, Jie Zhou & Charles N. Rotimi (2014). Voluntary Participation and Comprehension of Informed Consent in a Genetic Epidemiological Study of Breast Cancer in Nigeria. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):38.
    Studies on informed consent to medical research conducted in low or middle-income settings have increased, including empirical investigations of consent to genetic research. We investigated voluntary participation and comprehension of informed consent among women involved in a genetic epidemiological study on breast cancer in an urban setting of Nigeria comparing women in the case and control groups.
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  3. Emmanuel R. Ezeome & Patricia A. Marshall (2009). Informed Consent Practices in Nigeria. Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):138-148.
    Most writing on informed consent in Africa highlights different cultural and social attributes that influence informed consent practices, especially in research settings. This review presents a composite picture of informed consent in Nigeria using empirical studies and legal and regulatory prescriptions, as well as clinical experience. It shows that Nigeria, like most other nations in Africa, is a mixture of sociocultural entities, and, notwithstanding the multitude of factors affecting it, informed consent is evolving along a purely Western model. Empirical studies (...)
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  4. Kathryn E. Artnak, Erika Blacksher, Michael C. Brannigan, Matti Häyry, Insoo Hyun, Kenneth V. Iserson, Patricia A. Marshall, Maghboeba Mosavel & India J. Ornelas (2008). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17:137-138.
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  5. Patricia A. Marshall (2008). “Cultural Competence” and Informed Consent in International Health Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (02):206-215.
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  6. Patricia A. Marshall & Jessica W. Berg (2006). Protecting Communities in Biomedical Research. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (3):28 – 30.
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  7. Patricia A. Marshall (2005). Human Rights,Cultural Pluralism, and International Health Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):529-557.
    In the field of bioethics, scholars have begun to consider carefully the impact of structural issues on global population health, including socioeconomic and political factors influencing the disproportionate burden of disease throughout the world. Human rights and social justice are key considerations for both population health and biomedical research. In this paper, I will briefly explore approaches to human rights in bioethics and review guidelines for ethical conduct in international health research, focusing specifically on health research conducted in resource-poor settings. (...)
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  8. Patricia A. Marshall (2001). A Contextual Approach to Clinical Ethics Consultation. In C. Barry Hoffmaster (ed.), Bioethics in Social Context. Temple University Press. 137--152.
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  9. Jonathan Muraskas, Patricia A. Marshall, Paul Tomich, Thomas F. Myers, John G. Gianopoulos & David C. Thomasma (1999). Neonatal Viability in the 1990s: Held Hostage by Technology. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):160-170.
    The emergence of new obstetrical and neonatal technologies, as well as more aggressive clinical management, has significantly improved the survival of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. This development has heightened concerns about the limits of viability. ELBW infants, weighing less than 1,000 grams and no larger than the palm of one's hand, are often described as of late twentieth century technology. Improved survivability of ELBW infants has provided opportunities for long-term follow-up. Information on their physical and emotional development contributes (...)
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  10. H. Eugene Hern, Barbara A. Koenig, Lisa Jean Moore & Patricia A. Marshall (1998). The Difference That Culture Can Make in End-of-Life Decisionmaking. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (01):27-40.
    Cultural difference has been largely ignored within bioethics, particularly within the end-of-life discourses and practices that have developed over the past two decades in the U.S. healthcare system. Yet how should culturebe taken into account?
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  11. Susan E. Kelly, Patricia A. Marshall, Lee M. Sanders, Thomas A. Raffin & Barbara A. Koenig (1997). Understanding the Practice of Ethics Consultation: Results of an Ethnographic Multi-Site Study. Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (2):136-149.
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  12. Patricia A. Marshall (1996). Introduction: Organ Transplantation — Defining the Boundaries of Personhood, Equity and Community. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
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  13. Patricia A. Marshall, David C. Thomasma & Abdallah S. Daar (1996). Marketing Human Organs: The Autonomy Paradox. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
    The severe shortage of organs for transplantation and the continual reluctance of the public to voluntarily donate has prompted consideration of alternative strategies for organ procurement. This paper explores the development of market approaches for procuring human organs for transplantation and considers the social and moral implications of organ donation as both a gift of life and a commodity exchange. The problematic and paradoxical articulation of individual autonomy in relation to property rights and marketing human body parts is addressed. We (...)
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  14. David C. Thomasma, Jonathan Muraskas, Patricia A. Marshall, Thomas Myers, Paul Tomich & James A. O'Neill (1996). The Ethics of Caring for Conjoined Twins The Lakeberg Twins. Hastings Center Report 26 (4):4-12.
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  15. Patricia A. Marshall (1995). The SUPPORT Study Who's Talking? Hastings Center Report 25 (6):9-11.
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  16. Patricia A. Marshall, Jay Hartz & S. Y. Tan (1994). Ethics Committees at Work. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (01):135-.
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  17. Patricia A. Marshall (1991). Ethics in Human Reproduction Research in the Muslim World. Irb 14 (2):6-6.
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  18. Patricia A. Marshall, Carsten Cruse & August Herbst (1990). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (4).
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