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  1. Patricia A. Williams (2001). The Problem of Evil: A Solution From Science. Zygon 36 (3):563-574.
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  2. Patricia A. Williams (2000). Sociobiology and Original Sin. Zygon 35 (4):783-812.
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  3. Patricia A. Williams (1998). Evolution, Sociobiology, and the Atonement. Zygon 33 (4):557-570.
    This essay views Christian doctrines of the atonement in the light of evolution and sociobiology. It argues that most of the doctrines are false because they use a false premise, the historicity of Adam and the Fall. However, two doctrines are not false on those grounds: Abelard’s idea that Jesus’ life is an example and Athanasius’s concept that the atonement changes human nature. Employing evolution’s and sociobiology’s concepts of the egocentric and ethnocentric nature of humanity and the synergy between genes (...)
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  4. Patricia A. Williams (1996). Christianity and Evolutionary Ethics: Sketch Toward a Reconciliation. Zygon 31 (2):253-268.
  5. Patricia A. Williams (1996). Sociobiology and Philosophy of Science. Biology and Philosophy 11 (2):271-281.
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  6. Patricia A. Williams (1993). Can Beings Whose Ethics Evolved Be Ethical Beings. In Matthew Nitecki & Doris Nitecki (eds.), Evolutionary Ethics. Suny Press. 233--239.
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  7. Patricia A. Williams (1992). Confusion in Cladism. Synthese 91 (1-2):135 - 152.
    In Phylogenetic Systematics (1966), Willi Hennig conflates the Linnaean hierarchy with what Hennig refers to as the divisional hierarchy. In doing so, he lays the foundations of that school of biological taxonomy known as cladism on a philosophically ambiguous basis. This paper compares and contrasts the two hierarchies and demonstrates that Hennig conflates them. It shows that Hennig's followers also conflate them. Finally, it illuminates five persistent problems in cladism by suggesting that they arise from Hennig's original confusion.
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