Search results for 'Patricia Caplan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Patricia Caplan (ed.) (2003). The Ethics of Anthropology: Debates and Dilemmas. Routledge.
    Since the inception of their discipline, anthropologists have studied virtually every conceivable aspect of other peoples' morality - religion, social control, sin, virtue, evil, duty, purity and pollution. But what of the examination of anthropology itself, and of its agendas, epistemes, theories and praxes? Conceived as a response to Patrick Tierney's hugely inflammatory book Darkness in El Dorado , whose allegations of immoral and negligent anthropological research in South America caused a storm of protest and debate, the book combines theoretical (...)
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  2.  3
    R. M. Ogilvie, H. Caplan & L. Wallach (1968). The Classical Tradition: Literary and Historical Studies in Honor of Harry Caplan. Journal of Hellenic Studies 88:249.
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  3. Harry Caplan, Anne King & Helen North (1972). Of Eloquence: Studies in Ancient and Mediaeval Rhetoric by Harry Caplan. Philosophy and Rhetoric 5 (3):196-197.
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  4. G. McGee & A. L. Caplan (2000). " Small Sacrifices" in Stem Cell Research-Glenn McGee and Arthur Caplan Reply. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (1):104-107.
     
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  5.  4
    Arthur L. Caplan, Daniel Callahan & Janet Haas (1987). Ethical & Policy Issues in Rehabilitation Medicine. Hastings Center Report 17 (4):1-20.
    The field of medical rehabilitation is relatively new.... Until recently, the ethical problems of this new field were neglected. There seemed to be more pressing concerns as rehabilitation medicine struggled to establish itself, sometimes in the face of considerable skepticism or hostility. There also seemed no pressing moral questions of the kind and intensity to be encountered, say, in high-technology acute care medicine or genetic engineering.... Those in biomedical ethics could and did easily overlook the quiet, less obtrusive issues of (...)
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  6. Ben Caplan & David Sanson (2010). The Way Things Were. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (1):24-39.
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  7. Ben Caplan (2007). Millian Descriptivism. Philosophical Studies 133 (2):181-198.
    In this paper, I argue against Millian Descriptivism: that is, the view that, although sentences that contain names express singular propositions, when they use those sentences speakers communicate descriptive propositions. More precisely, I argue that Millian Descriptivism fares no better (or worse) than Fregean Descriptivism: that is, the view that sentences express descriptive propositions. This is bad news for Millian Descriptivists who think that Fregean Descriptivism is dead.
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  8. Ben Caplan (2004). Creatures of Fiction, Myth, and Imagination. American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (4):331-337.
    In the nineteenth century, astronomers thought that a planet between Mercury and the Sun was causing perturbations in the orbit of Mercury, and they introduced ‘Vulcan’ as a name for such a planet. But they were wrong: there was, and is, no intra-Mercurial planet. Still, these astronomers went around saying things like (2) Vulcan is a planet between Mercury and the Sun. Some philosophers think that, when nineteenth-century astronomers were theorizing about an intra-Mercurial planet, they created a hypothetical planet.
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  9. Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson (2004). Can a Musical Work Be Created? British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):113-134.
    Can a musical work be created? Some say ‘no’. But, we argue, there is no handbook of universally accepted metaphysical truths that they can use to justify their answer. Others say ‘yes’. They have to find abstract objects that can plausibly be identified with musical works, show that abstract objects of this sort can be created, and show that such abstract objects can persist. But, we argue, none of the standard views about what a musical work is allows musical works (...)
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  10. Ben Caplan (2003). Putting Things in Contexts. Philosophical Review 112 (2):191-214.
    Thanks to David Kaplan (1989a, 1989b), we all know how to handle indexicals like ‘I’. ‘I’ doesn’t refer to an object simpliciter; rather, it refers to an object only relative to a context. In particular, relative to a context C, ‘I’ refers to the agent of C. Since different contexts can have different agents, ‘I’ can refer to different objects relative to different contexts. For example, relative to a context cwhose agent is Gottlob Frege, ‘I’ refers to Frege; relative to (...)
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  11. Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson (2006). Defending Musical Perdurantism. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):59-69.
    If musical works are abstract objects, which cannot enter into causal relations, then how can we refer to musical works or know anything about them? Worse, how can any of our musical experiences be experiences of musical works? It would be nice to be able to sidestep these questions altogether. One way to do that would be to take musical works to be concrete objects. In this paper, we defend a theory according to which musical works are concrete objects. In (...)
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  12. Ben Caplan (2005). Against Widescopism. Philosophical Studies 125 (2):167-190.
    Descriptivists say that every name is synonymous with some definite description, and Descriptivists who are Widescopers say that the definite description that a name is synonymous with must take wide scope with respect to modal adverbs such as “necessarily”. In this paper, I argue against Widescopism. Widescopers should be Super Widescopers: that is, they should say that the definite description that a name is synonymous with must take wide scope with respect to complementizers such as “that”. Super Widescopers should be (...)
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  13. Ben Caplan (2005). Why So Tense About the Copula? Mind 114 (455):703 - 708.
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  14. Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson (2008). Defending 'Defending Musical Perdurantism'. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):80-85.
    British Journal of Aesthetics (forthcoming Jan. 2008).
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  15. Ben Caplan (2002). Quotation and Demonstration. Philosophical Studies 111 (1):69-80.
    In "Demonstratives or Demonstrations", Marga Reimer argues that quotation marks are demonstrations and that expressions enclosed with them are demonstratives. In this paper, I argue against her view. There are two objections. The first objection is that Reimer''s view has unattractive consequences: there is more ambiguity, there are more demonstratives, and there are more English expressions than we thought. The second objection is that, unlike other ambiguous expressions, some expressions that are ambiguous on Reimer''s view can''t be disambiguated by using (...)
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  16. Ben Caplan (2007). A New Defence of the Modal Existence Requirement. Synthese 154 (2):335 - 343.
    In this paper, I defend the claim that an object can have a property only if it exists from two arguments, both of which turn on how to understand Plantinga’s notion of the α-transform of a property.
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  17. Carl Matheson & Ben Caplan (2007). Fine Individuation. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):113-137.
    Jerrold Levinson argues that musical works are individuated by their context of origin. But one could just as well argue that musical works are individuated by their context of reception. Moderate contextualism, according to which musical works are individuated by context of origin but not by context of reception, thus appears to be an unstable position. And, although a more thoroughgoing contextualism, according to which musical works are individuated both by context of origin and by context of reception, faces a (...)
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  18.  32
    David Caplan & Gloria S. Waters (1999). Verbal Working Memory and Sentence Comprehension. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):77-94.
    This target article discusses the verbal working memory system used in sentence comprehension. We review the concept of working memory as a short-duration system in which small amounts of information are simultaneously stored and manipulated in the service of accomplishing a task. We summarize the argument that syntactic processing in sentence comprehension requires such a storage and computational system. We then ask whether the working memory system used in syntactic processing is the same as that used in verbally mediated tasks (...)
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  19. Ben Caplan & Bob Bright (2005). Fusions and Ordinary Physical Objects. Philosophical Studies 125 (1):61-83.
    In “Tropes and Ordinary Physical Objects”, Kris McDaniel argues that ordinary physical objects are fusions of monadic and polyadic tropes. McDaniel calls his view “TOPO”—for “Theory of Ordinary Physical Objects”. He argues that we should accept TOPO because of the philosophical work that it allows us to do. Among other things, TOPO is supposed to allow endurantists to reply to Mark Heller’s argument for perdurantism. But, we argue in this paper, TOPO does not help endurantists do that; indeed, we argue (...)
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  20. Andrew Cullison & Ben Caplan (2011). Descriptivism, Scope, and Apparently Empty Names. Philosophical Studies 156 (2):283-288.
  21.  9
    Arthur L. Caplan (1981). Back to Class: A Note on the Ontology of Species. Philosophy of Science 48 (1):130-140.
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  22.  14
    Ellen Matloff & Arthur Caplan (2008). Direct to Confusion: Lessons Learned From Marketing Brca Testing. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):5 – 8.
    Myriad Genetics holds a patent on testing for the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, and therefore has a forced monopoly on this critical genetic test. Myriad launched a Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) marketing campaign in the Northeast United States in September 2007 and plans to expand that campaign to Florida and Texas in 2008. The ethics of Myriad's patent, forced monopoly and DTC campaign will be reviewed, as well as the impact of this situation on patient access and (...)
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  23.  43
    Mike Thau & Ben Caplan (2001). What's Puzzling Gottlob Frege? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):159-200.
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  24.  41
    Timothy Schroeder & Ben Caplan (2007). On the Content of Experience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):590–611.
    The intentionalist about consciousness holds that the qualitative character of experience.
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  25.  87
    Ben Caplan (2006). On Sense and Direct Reference. Philosophy Compass 1 (2):171-185.
  26.  6
    Arthur L. Caplan (2005). "Who Lost China?" A Foreshadowing of Today's Ideological Disputes in Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 35 (3):12-13.
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  27. Ben Caplan & Kris McDaniel, Mereological Myths.
     
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  28.  14
    Arthur L. Caplan, Constance Marie Perry, Lauren A. Plante, Joseph Saloma & Frances R. Batzer (2007). Moving the Womb. Hastings Center Report 37 (3):18-20.
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  29.  12
    Arthur Caplan (2007). Is It Sound Public Policy to Let the Terminally Ill Access Experimental Medical Innovations? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):1 – 3.
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  30.  19
    Bryan Caplan (2009). Majorities Against Utility: Implications of the Failure of the Miracle of Aggregation. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):198-211.
    A surprising conclusion of modern political economy is that democracies with highly ignorant voters can still deliver very good results as long as voters' errors balance each other out. This result is known as the Miracle of Aggregation. This paper begins by reviewing a large body of evidence against this Miracle. Empirically, voters' errors tend to be systematic; they compound rather than cancel. Furthermore, since most citizens vote for the policies they believe are best for society, systematic errors lead voters (...)
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  31.  1
    Arthur Caplan (2004). Facing Ourselves. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):18 – 20.
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  32.  42
    Arthur L. Caplan (1992). Does the Philosophy of Medicine Exist? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (1):67-77.
    There has been a great deal of discussion, in this journal and others, about obstacles hindering the evolution of the philosophy of medicine. Such discussions presuppose that there is widespread agreement about what it is that constitutes the philosophy of medicine.Despite the fact that there is, and has been for decades, a great deal of literature, teaching and professional activity carried out explicitly in the name of the philosophy of medicine, this is not enough to establish that consensus exists as (...)
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  33. Arthur L. Caplan, H. Tristram Engelhardt & James J. McCartney (eds.) (1981). Concepts of Health and Disease: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Addison-Wesley, Advanced Book Program/World Science Division.
     
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  34. Ben Caplan (2002). Empty Names. Dissertation, UCLA
    In my dissertation (UCLA 2002), I argue that, by appropriating Fregean resources, Millians can solve the problems that empty names pose. As a result, the debate between Millians and Fregeans should be understood, not as a debate about whether there are senses, but rather as a debate about where there are senses.
     
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  35.  9
    Arthur L. Caplan (1983). Can Applied Ethics Be Effective in Health Care and Should It Strive to Be? Ethics 93 (2):311-319.
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  36.  75
    Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson (2008). Modality, Individuation, and the Ontology of Art. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):491-517.
    In 1988, Michael Nyman composed the score for Peter Greenaway’s film Drowning by Numbers (or did something that we would ordinarily think of as composing that score). We can think of Nyman’s compositional activity as a “generative performance” and of the sound structure that Nyman indicated (or of some other abstract object that is appropriately related to that sound structure) as the product generated by that performance (ix).1 According to one view, Nyman’s score for Drowning by the Numbers—the musical work—is (...)
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  37.  15
    Ben Caplan (2008). Review of Trenton Merricks, Truth and Ontology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (2).
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  38.  48
    Arthur Caplan (1978). Medical Fallibility and Malpractice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (3):169-186.
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  39.  9
    Glenn McGee & Arthur Caplan (2007). Playing [with] God: Prayer is Not a Prescription. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):1.
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  40.  17
    Arthur L. Caplan (1986). Exemplary Reasoning? A Comment on Theory Structure in Biomedicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 11 (1):93-105.
    The contributions that the philosophy of medicine can make to both the philosophy of science and the practice of science have been obscured in recent years by an overemphasis on personalities rather than critical themes. Two themes have dominated general discussion within contemporary philosophy of science: methodological essentialism and dynamic gradualism. These themes are defined and considered in light of Kenneth Schaffner's argument that theories in biomedicine have a structure and logic unlike that found in theories of the natural sciences. (...)
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  41.  14
    Arthur Caplan (1978). Testability, Disreputability, and the Structure of the Modern Synthetic Theory of Evolution. Erkenntnis 13 (1):261 - 278.
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  42.  2
    Arthur L. Caplan & David R. Curry (2007). Leveraging Genetic Resources or Moral Blackmail? Indonesia and Avian Flu Virus Sample Sharing. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):1 – 2.
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  43.  38
    Glenn McGee & Arthur L. Caplan (1999). The Ethics and Politics of Small Sacrifices in Stem Cell Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (2):151-158.
    : Pluripotent human stem cell research may offer new treatments for hundreds of diseases, but opponents of this research argue that such therapy comes attached to a Faustian bargain: cures at the cost of the destruction of many frozen embryos. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC), government officials, and many scholars of bioethics, including, in these pages, John Robertson, have not offered an adequate response to ethical objections to stem cell research. Instead of examining the ethical issues involved in sacrificing (...)
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  44.  29
    Carl Matheson & Ben Caplan (2009). Modality, Individuation, and the Ontology of Art. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):491-517.
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  45.  7
    Arthur C. Caplan (1980). Have Species Become Declasse? Psa 1980:71-82.
    Traditionally, species have been treated as classes or kinds in philosophical discussions of systematics and evolutionary biology. Recently a number of biologists and philosophers have proposed a drastic revision of this traditional ontological categorization. They have argued that species ought be viewed as individuals rather than as classes or natural kinds. In this paper an attempt is made to show that (a) the reasons advanced in support of this new view of species are not persuasive, (b) a reasonable explication can (...)
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  46.  5
    David Caplan (2000). Lesion Location and Aphasic Syndrome Do Not Tell Us Whether a Patient Will Have an Isolated Deficit Affecting the Coindexation of Traces. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):25-27.
    Data from published case and group studies bear on the trace deletion hypothesis. The deficit-lesion correlational literature does not support Grodzinsky's claim that lesions in and around Broca's area inevitably lead to comprehension deficits specifically related to coindexation of traces or his claim that other lesions spare this function.
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  47.  24
    Robert I. Field Arthur L. Caplan (2008). A Proposed Ethical Framework for Vaccine Mandates: Competing Values and the Case of HPV. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (2):pp. 111-124.
    Debates over vaccine mandates raise intense emotions, as reflected in the current controversy over whether to mandate the vaccine against human papilloma virus (HPV), the virus that can cause cervical cancer. Public health ethics so far has failed to facilitate meaningful dialogue between the opposing sides. When stripped of its emotional charge, the debate can be framed as a contest between competing ethical values. This framework can be conceptualized graphically as a conflict between autonomy on the one hand, which militates (...)
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  48.  7
    Ben Caplan (2004). Terms and Truth: Reference Direct and Anaphoric. Dialogue 43 (3):617-619.
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    E. Gorman Michael, H. Werhane Patricia & Nathan Swami (2009). Moral Imagination, Trading Zones, and the Role of the Ethicist in Nanotechnology. NanoEthics 3 (3).
    The societal and ethical impacts of emerging technological and business systems cannot entirely be foreseen; therefore, management of these innovations will require at least some ethicists to work closely with researchers. This is particularly critical in the development of new systems because the maximum degrees of freedom for changing technological direction occurs at or just after the point of breakthrough; that is also the point where the long-term implications are hardest to visualize. Recent work on shared expertise in Science & (...)
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  50.  23
    B. Hwang Dennis, L. Golemon Patricia, Teng-Shih Wang Yan Chen & Wen-Shai Hung (2009). Guanxi and Business Ethics in Confucian Society Today: An Empirical Case Study in Taiwan. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2).
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