Search results for 'Patricia Cook' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Roy T. Cook (2013). Patricia A. Blanchette. Frege's Conception of Logic. Oxford University Press, 2012. ISBN 978-0-19-926925-9 (Hbk). Pp. Xv + 256. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica (1):nkt029.score: 360.0
  2. Patricia Cook (ed.) (1993). Philosophical Imagination and Cultural Memory: Appropriating Historical Traditions. Duke University Press.score: 240.0
    In this volume some of today's most influential thinkers face the question of philosophy's future and find an answer in its past.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Timothy M. Beardsley, Robert Frodeman, J. Britt Holbrook, Patricia S. Bourexis, Susan B. Cook, Laura Diederick, Richard A. Tankersley, Sujay S. Kaushal, Jonathan M. Jeschke & Ann P. Kinzig (2013). 10. Spring Spotlight on Books. BioScience 63 (3).score: 240.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Patricia Cook (1990). The Ancients and the Moderns. New Vico Studies 8:115-119.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Robert Frodeman, J. Britt Holbrook, Patricia S. Bourexis, Susan B. Cook, Laura Diederick & Richard A. Tankersley (2013). Broader Impacts 2.0: Seeing-and Seizing-the Opportunity. BioScience 63 (3):153-154.score: 240.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Deborah Cook (1987). Arthur Kroker and David Cook, The Postmodern Scene: Excremental Culture and Hyperaesthetics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 7 (3):114-116.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Cecil H. Smith, C. Amy Hutton & Wyndham Francis Cook (1909). Catalogue of the Antiquities (Greek, Etruscan, and Roman) in the Collection of the Late Wyndham Francis Cook, Esquire. Journal of Hellenic Studies 29:375.score: 180.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. R. M. D., A. J. B. Wace & F. H. Cook (1935). Mediterranean and Near East Embroideries From the Collection of Mrs. F. H. Cook. Journal of Hellenic Studies 55:271.score: 180.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. John W. Cook (1999). Morality and Cultural Differences. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The scholars who defend or dispute moral relativism, the idea that a moral principle cannot be applied to people whose culture does not accept it, have concerned themselves with either the philosophical or anthropological aspects of relativism. This study, shows that in order to arrive at a definitive appraisal of moral relativism, it is necessary to understand and investigate both its anthropological and philosophical aspects. Carefully examining the arguments for and against moral relativism, Cook exposes not only that anthropologists (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. John W. Cook (1994). Wittgenstein's Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Wittgenstein's Metaphysics offers a radical new interpretation of the fundamental ideas of Ludwig Wittgenstein. It takes issue with the conventional view that after 1930 Wittgenstein rejected the philosophy of the Tractatus and developed a wholly new conception of philosophy. By tracing the evolution of Wittgenstein's ideas Cook shows that they are neither as original nor as difficult as is often supposed. Wittgenstein was essentially an empiricist, and the difference between his early views (as set forth in the Tractatus) and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. M. A. Cook (2000). Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    What kind of duty do we have to try to stop other people doing wrong? The question is intelligible in just about any culture, but few of them seek to answer it in a rigorous fashion. The most striking exception is found in the Islamic tradition, where 'commanding right' and 'forbidding wrong' is a central moral tenet already mentioned in the Koran. As an historian of Islam whose research has ranged widely over space and time, Michael Cook is well (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Nicholas Cook (1990). Music, Imagination, and Culture. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Drawing on psychological and philosophical materials as well as the analysis of specific musical examples, Cook here defines the difference between music...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Roy T. Cook & Philip A. Ebert (2005). Abstraction and Identity. Dialectica 59 (2):121–139.score: 60.0
    A co-authored article with Roy T. Cook forthcoming in a special edition on the Caesar Problem of the journal Dialectica. We argue against the appeal to equivalence classes in resolving the Caesar Problem.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. John W. Cook (2000). Wittgenstein, Empiricism, and Language. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This provocative study exposes the ways in which Wittgenstein's philosophical views have been misunderstood, including the failure to recognize the reductionist character of Wittgenstein's work. Author John Cook provides well-documented proof that Wittgenstein did not hold views commonly attributed to him, arguing that Wittgenstein's later work was mistakenly seen as a development of G. E. Moore's philosophy--which Wittgenstein in fact vigorously attacked. He also points to an underestimation of Russell's influence on Wittgenstein's thinking. Cook goes on to show (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. John Cook (2006). Did Wittgenstein Practise What He Preached? Philosophy 81 (3):445-462.score: 60.0
    Wittgenstein made numerous pronouncements about philosophical method. But did he practice what he preached? Cook addresses this question by studying Wittgenstein’s treatment of the problem of other minds, tracing a line of argument that runs through his writings and lectures from the early 1930s to the 1950s. Cook finds that there is an inconsistency between Wittgenstein’s methodological advice and his actual practice. Instead of bringing words back from their metaphysical to their everyday use, he allows himself to use (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.) (2012). The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: Foreword (Warren Ellis).Introduction (Roy T. Cook and Aaron Meskin).PART I: The Nature and Kinds of Comics.1. Redefining Comics (John Holbo).2. The Ontology of Comics (Aaron Meskin).3. Comics and Collective Authorship (Christy Mag Uidhir).4. Comics and Genre (Catharine Abell).PART 2: Comics and Representation.5. Wordy Pictures: Theorizing the Relationship between Image and Text in Comics (Thomas E. Wartenberg).6. What's So Funny? Comic Content in Depiction (Patrick Maynard).7. The Language of Comics (Darren Hudson Hick).PART 3: Comics and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. B. G. Cook (2012). Ibn Sab'în and Islamic Orthodoxy: A Reassessment. Journal of Islamic Philosophy 8 (2012):Article - 2.score: 60.0
    Benjamin G. Cook, Ibn Sabʿîn and Islamic Orthodoxy: A Reassessment.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Deborah Cook (2012). Völker Heins, Between Friend and Foe: The Politics of Critical Theory. Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):266 - 268.score: 60.0
    Völker Heins, Between Friend and Foe: The Politics of Critical Theory Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 266-268 Authors Deborah Cook, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, Ontario, N9B 3P4, Canada Journal Journal of Critical Realism Online ISSN 1572-5138 Print ISSN 1476-7430 Journal Volume Volume 11 Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 2 / 2012.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. M. A. Cook (2003). Forbidding Wrong in Islam: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Michael Cook's classic study, Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought (Cambridge, 2001), reflected upon the Islamic injunction to forbid wrongdoing. This book is a short, accessible survey of the same material. Using Islamic history to illustrate his argument, Cook unravels the complexities of the subject by demonstrating how the past informs the present. At the book's core is an important message about the values of Islamic traditions and their relevance in the modern world.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving women's health and rights around the world. It was internationally endorsed by a United Nations conference in 1994, but remains controversial because of the challenge it presents to conservative agencies: it challenges policies of suppressing public discussion on human sexuality and regulating its private expressions. Reproductive Health and Human Rights is designed to equip healthcare providers and administrators to integrate ethical, legal, and human rights principles in protection (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Deborah Cook (2006). Adorno’s Critical Materialism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (6):719-737.score: 30.0
    The article explores the character of Adorno’s materialism while fleshing out his Marxist-inspired idea of natural history. Adorno offers a non-reductionist and non-dualistic account of the relationship between matter and mind, human history and natural history. Emerging from nature and remaining tied to it, the human mind is nonetheless qualitatively distinct from nature owing to its limited independence from it. Yet, just as human history is always also natural history, because human beings can never completely dissociate themselves from the natural (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. J. Thomas Cook (1987). Deciding to Believe Without Self-Deception. Journal of Philosophy 84 (August):441-446.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Roy T. Cook (2005). What's Wrong with Tonk(?). Journal of Philosophical Logic 34 (2):217 - 226.score: 30.0
    In “The Runabout Inference Ticket” AN Prior (1960) examines the idea that logical connectives can be given a meaning solely in virtue of the stip- ulation of a set of rules governing them, and thus that logical truth/conse- quence.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. John W. Cook (2008). Bouwsma on Wittgenstein's Philosophical Method. Philosophical Investigations 31 (4):285-317.score: 30.0
    It is argued that Wittgenstein was a greatly misunderstood philosopher, both as regards his own philosophical views and his ideas about philosophical method. O. K. Bouwsma's interpretation of Wittgenstein is used to illustrate the most common misunderstandings.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Thomas Cook, Adequate Understanding of Inadequate Ideas: Power and Paradox in Spinoza's Cognitive Therapy.score: 30.0
    Spinoza shared with his contemporaries the conviction that the passions are, on the whole, unruly and destructive. A life of virtue requires that the passions be controlled, if not entirely vanquished, and the preferred means of imposing this control over the passions is via the power of reason. But there was little agreement in the seventeenth century about just what gives reason its strength and how its power can be brought to bear upon the wayward passions.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John W. Cook (1965). Wittgenstein on Privacy. Philosophical Review 74 (3):281-314.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Philip Cook (2008). An Augmented Buck-Passing Account of Reasons and Value: Scanlon and Crisp on What Stops the Buck. Utilitas 20 (4):490-507.score: 30.0
    Roger Crisp has inspired two important criticisms of Scanlon's buck-passing account of value. I defend buck-passing from the wrong kind of reasons criticism, and the reasons and the good objection. I support Rabinowicz and Rønnow-Rasmussen's dual role of reasons in refuting the wrong kind of reasons criticism, even where its authors claim it fails. Crisp's reasons and the good objection contends that the property of goodness is buck-passing in virtue of its formality. I argue that Crisp conflates general and formal (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Roy T. Cook (2002). Vagueness and Mathematical Precision. Mind 111 (442):225-247.score: 30.0
    One of the main reasons for providing formal semantics for languages is that the mathematical precision afforded by such semantics allows us to study and manipulate the formalization much more easily than if we were to study the relevant natural languages directly. Michael Tye and R. M. Sainsbury have argued that traditional set-theoretic semantics for vague languages are all but useless, however, since this mathematical precision eliminates the very phenomenon (vagueness) that we are trying to capture. Here we meet this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. John W. Cook (2007). Did Wittgenstein Speak with the Vulgar or Think with the Learned? Or Did He Do Both? Philosophy 82 (2):213-233.score: 30.0
    Wittgenstein has often been criticized, and even dismissed, for being a patron of ordinary language, a champion of the vernacular, a defender of the status quo. One critic has written: 'When Wittgenstein set up the actual use of language as a standard, that was equivalent to accepting a certain set up of culture and belief as a standard ... It is lucky no such philosophy was thought of until recently or we should still be under the sway of witch doctors (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John W. Cook (1997). How to Read Wittgenstein. Philosophical Investigations 20 (3):224–245.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. N. D. Cook (2002). Tone of Voice and Mind: The Connections Between Intonation, Emotion, Cognition and Consciousness. John Benjamins.score: 30.0
    Includes bibliographical references (p. [271]-285) and index.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Albert Cook (1986). The "Meta-Irony" of Marcel Duchamp. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (3):263-270.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Monte Cook (2007). Malebranche's Criticism of Descartes's Proof That There Are Bodies. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (4):641 – 657.score: 30.0
  34. Roy T. Cook (2003). Aristotelian Logic, Axioms, and Abstraction. Philosophia Mathematica 11 (2):195-202.score: 30.0
    Stewart Shapiro and Alan Weir have argued that a crucial part of the demonstration of Frege's Theorem (specifically, that Hume's Principle implies that there are infinitely many objects) fails if the Neo-logicist cannot assume the existence of the empty property, i.e., is restricted to so-called Aristotelian Logic. Nevertheless, even in the context of Aristotelian Logic, Hume's Principle implies much of the content of Peano Arithmetic. In addition, their results do not constitute an objection to Neo-logicism so much as a clarification (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Roy T. Cook (2009). Hume's Big Brother: Counting Concepts and the Bad Company Objection. Synthese 170 (3):349 - 369.score: 30.0
    A number of formal constraints on acceptable abstraction principles have been proposed, including conservativeness and irenicity. Hume’s Principle, of course, satisfies these constraints. Here, variants of Hume’s Principle that allow us to count concepts instead of objects are examined. It is argued that, prima facie, these principles ought to be no more problematic than HP itself. But, as is shown here, these principles only enjoy the formal properties that have been suggested as indicative of acceptability if certain constraints on the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Roy T. Cook (2006). Knights, Knaves and Unknowable Truths. Analysis 66 (289):10–16.score: 30.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Deborah Cook (1995). The Sundered Totality: Adorno's Freudo-Marxism. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (2):191–215.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Roy T. Cook & Jon Cogburn (2000). What Negation is Not: Intuitionism and ‘0=1’. Analysis 60 (265):5–12.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Roy T. Cook (2003). Review of J. Mayberry, The Foundations of Mathematics in the Theory of Sets. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):347-352.score: 30.0
  40. Deborah Cook (2007). Nature, Red in Tooth and Claw. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (1):49-72.score: 30.0
    “Nature, Red in Tooth and Claw” explores Adorno’s ideas about our mediated relationship with nature. The first section of the paper examines the epistemological significance of his thesis about the preponderance of the object while describing the Kantian features in his notion of mediation. Adorno’s conception of nature will also be examined in the context of a review of J. M. Bernstein’s and Fredric Jameson’s attempts to characterize it. The second section of the paper deals with Adorno’s Freudian account of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Roy T. Cook (2008). 'P is True and Non-Cartesian' is Non-Cartesian. Analysis 68 (299):183–185.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Deborah Cook (1986). Translation as a Reading. British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (2):143-149.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Monte Cook (1980). If 'Cat' is a Rigid Designator, What Does It Designate? Philosophical Studies 37 (1):61-4.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Kathleen C. Cook (1975). On the Usefulness of Quantities. Synthese 31 (3-4):443 - 457.score: 30.0
    I have argued that there is a philosophical problem posed by a need to determine the reference of expressions which seem to refer to kinds of stuff or matter and to make identity claims about it (e.g., ‘the gold’, ‘the same clay’). Ordinary sortal expressions such as ‘lump’, and ‘piece’ have been shown to be inadequate to the task of providing reference for the expressions in question. What is necessary is an expression which does not have an ordinary sortal use (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Thomas I. Cook (1939). Political Obligation, Democracy, and Moralistic Legislation. Ethics 49 (2):148-168.score: 30.0
  46. Roy T. Cook (2006). There Are Non-Circular Paradoxes (but Yablo's Isn't One of Them!). The Monist 89 (1):118-149.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Roy T. Cook & Philip A. Ebert (2004). Kit Fine, the Limits of Abstraction Oxford, Clarendon Press, 2002, Cloth £18.99/US $25.00 ISBN: 0-19-924618-. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (4):791-800.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Nicholas Cook (1987). Musical Form and the Listener. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (1):23-29.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Martin L. Cook (2000). "Immaculate War": Constraints on Humanitarian Intervention. Ethics and International Affairs 14 (1):55–65.score: 30.0
  50. Scott Cook (1997). Zhuang Zi and His Carving of the Confucian Ox. Philosophy East and West 47 (4):521-553.score: 30.0
    Zhuang Zi's relation to the Confucian school is reexamined. It is argued that although Zhuang Zi was fond of highlighting the absurdities of the Confucian enterprise, we can nonetheless detect in his writings a great admiration for much of what constituted the central core of the Confucian vision. This essay analyzes Confucius' image of "musical perfection," representing the total concordance of ritual restraints and harmonious freedom; traces the Confucian notion of self-cultivation through Mencius' passage on the "full-flowing energy"; and concludes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000