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  1. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2014). Setting Up Spaces for Collaboration in Industry Between Researchers From the Natural and Social Sciences. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):7-22.
    Policy makers call upon researchers from the natural and social sciences to collaborate for the responsible development and deployment of innovations. Collaborations are projected to enhance both the technical quality of innovations, and the extent to which relevant social and ethical considerations are integrated into their development. This could make these innovations more socially robust and responsible, particularly in new and emerging scientific and technological fields, such as synthetic biology and nanotechnology. Some researchers from both fields have embarked on collaborative (...)
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  2. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). Midstream Modulation in Biotechnology Industry: Redefining What is 'Part of the Job' of Researchers in Industry. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1141-1164.
    In response to an increasing amount of policy papers stressing the need for integrating social and ethical aspects in Research and Development (R&D) practices, science studies scholars have conducted integrative research and experiments with science and innovation actors. One widely employed integration method is Midstream Modulation (MM), in which an ‘embedded humanist’ interacts in regular meetings with researchers to engage them with the social and ethical aspects of their work. While the possibility of using MM to enhance critical reflection has (...)
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  3. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations for NEST (...)
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  4. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). Midstream Modulation in Biotechnology Industry: Redefining What is 'Part of the Job' of Researchers in Industry. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1141-1164.
    In response to an increasing amount of policy papers stressing the need for integrating social and ethical aspects in Research and Development (R&D) practices, science studies scholars have conducted integrative research and experiments with science and innovation actors. One widely employed integration method is Midstream Modulation (MM), in which an ‘embedded humanist’ interacts in regular meetings with researchers to engage them with the social and ethical aspects of their work. While the possibility of using MM to enhance critical reflection has (...)
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  5. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations for NEST (...)
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  6. Johannes Jacobs, Ibo van de Poel & Patricia Osseweijer (2010). Sunscreens with Titanium Dioxide (TiO 2 ) Nano-Particles: A Societal Experiment. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 4 (2):103-113.
    The risks of novel technologies, such as nano(bio)technology cannot be fully assessed due to the existing uncertainties surrounding their introduction into society. Consequently, the introduction of innovative technologies can be conceptualised as a societal experiment, which is a helpful approach to evaluate moral acceptability. This approach is illustrated with the marketing of sunscreens containing nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles. We argue that the marketing of this TiO2 nanomaterial in UV protective cosmetics is ethically undesirable, since it violates four reasonable moral (...)
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  7. Patricia Osseweijer (2010). Sunscreens with Titanium Dioxide (TiO 2 ) Nano-Particles: A Societal Experiment. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 4 (2):103-113.
    The risks of novel technologies, such as nano(bio)technology cannot be fully assessed due to the existing uncertainties surrounding their introduction into society. Consequently, the introduction of innovative technologies can be conceptualised as a societal experiment, which is a helpful approach to evaluate moral acceptability. This approach is illustrated with the marketing of sunscreens containing nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles. We argue that the marketing of this TiO2 nanomaterial in UV protective cosmetics is ethically undesirable, since it violates four reasonable moral (...)
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  8. Laurens Landeweerd, Patricia Osseweijer & Julian Kinderlerer (2009). Distributing Responsibility in the Debate on Sustainable Biofuels. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (4):531-543.
    In the perception of technology innovation two world views compete for domination: technological and social determinism. Technological determinism holds that societal change is caused by technological developments, social determinism holds the opposite. Although both were quite central to discussion in the philosophy, history and sociology of technology in the 1970s and 1980s, neither is seen as mainstream now. They do still play an important role as background philosophies in societal debates and offer two very different perspectives on where the responsibilities (...)
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  9. Daan Schuurbiers, Patricia Osseweijer & Julian Kinderlerer (2009). Implementing the Netherlands Code of Conduct for Scientific Practice—a Case Study. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):213-231.
    Widespread enthusiasm for establishing scientific codes of conduct notwithstanding, the utility of such codes in influencing scientific practice is not self-evident. It largely depends on the implementation phase following their establishment—a phase which often receives little attention. The aim of this paper is to provide recommendations for guiding effective implementation through an assessment of one particular code of conduct in one particular institute. Based on a series of interviews held with researchers at the Department of Biotechnology of Delft University of (...)
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  10. Daan Schuurbiers, Susanne Sleenhoff, Johannes Jacobs & Patricia Osseweijer (2009). Multidisciplinary Engagement with Nanoethics Through Education—The Nanobio-RAISE Advanced Courses as a Case Study and Model. NanoEthics 3 (3):197-211.
    This paper presents and evaluates two advanced courses organised in Oxford as part of the European project Nanobio-RAISE and suggests using their format to encourage multidisciplinary engagement between nanoscientists and nanoethicists. Several nanoethicists have recently identified the need for ‘better’ ethics of emerging technologies, arguing that ethical reflection should become part and parcel of the research and development (R&D) process itself. Such new forms of ethical deliberation, it is argued, transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries and require the active engagement and involvement (...)
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  11. Patricia Osseweijer (2006). A New Model for Science Communication That Takes Ethical Considerations Into Account. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):591-593.
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