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  1. Patrick D. Hopkins (2012). Why Uploading Will Not Work, or, the Ghosts Haunting Transhumanism. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):229-243.
  2. Patrick D. Hopkins (2008). A Moral Vision for Transhumanism. Journal of Evolution and Technology 19 (1):3-7.
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  3. Patrick D. Hopkins (2008). Can Technology Fix the Abortion Problem? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):311-326.
    The abortion controversy as a cultural phenomenon is itself socially troublesome. However, current biotechnology research programs point to a possible technological fix. If we could harmlessly remove fetuses from women’s bodies and transfer them to other women, cryonic suspension, or ectogenetic devices, this might mitigate the controversy. Pro-lifers’ apparent minimal requirement would be met—fetuses would not be killed. Pro-choicers’ apparent minimal requirement would be met—women could end pregnancies and control their bodies. This option has been optimistically anticipated by some ethicists, (...)
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  4. Patrick D. Hopkins (2008). Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy. Philosophy 4 (2).
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  5. Patrick D. Hopkins & Austin Dacey (2008). Vegetarian Meat: Could Technology Save Animals and Satisfy Meat Eaters? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):579-596.
    Between people who unabashedly support eating meat and those who adopt moral vegetarianism, lie a number of people who are uncomfortably carnivorous and vaguely wish they could be vegetarians. Opposing animal suffering in principle, they can ignore it in practice, relying on the visual disconnect between supermarket meat and slaughterhouse practices not to trigger their moral emotions. But what if we could have the best of both worlds in reality—eat meat and not harm animals? The nascent biotechnology of tissue culture, (...)
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  6. Patrick D. Hopkins (2007). Book Review: Richard D. Mohr. The Long Arc of Justice: Lesbian and Gay Marriage, Equality, and Rights. [REVIEW] Hypatia 22 (1):243-246.
  7. Patrick D. Hopkins (2006). The Long Arc of Justice: Lesbian and Gay Marriage, Equality, and Rights (Review). Hypatia 22 (1):243-246.
  8. Patrick D. Hopkins (2005). Transcending the Animal: How Transhumanism and Religion Are and Are Not Alike. Journal of Evolution and Technology 14 (2):13-28.
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  9. Patrick D. Hopkins (2002). Protecting God From Science and Technology: How Religious Criticisms of Biotechnologies Backfire. Zygon 37 (2):317-344.
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  10. Patrick D. Hopkins (2002). Sex and Social Justice (Review). Hypatia 17 (2):171-173.
  11. Patrick D. Hopkins (2002). Book Review: Martha C. Nussbaum. Sex and Social Justice. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (2):171-173.
  12. Patrick D. Hopkins (ed.) (1999). Sex/Machine: Readings in Culture, Gender, and Technology. Indiana University Press.
    An illuminating and often unsettling picture of the ethical, moral, and legal issues that shape experience, culture, and identity in the late twentieth century emerges from this thought-provoking collection.
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  13. Patrick D. Hopkins (1998). How Popular Media Represent Cloning as an Ethical Problem. Hastings Center Report 28 (2):6-13.
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  14. Patrick D. Hopkins (1998). Ow Popular Media Represent. Hastings Center Report 28:2.
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  15. Patrick D. Hopkins (1997). Why Does Removing Machines Count as “Passive” Euthanasia? Hastings Center Report 27 (3):29-37.
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  16. Patrick D. Hopkins (1995). Simulation and the Reproduction of Injustice: A Reply. Hypatia 10 (2):162 - 170.
    Melinda Vadas rejects my claim that there are morally relevant differences between simulations of unjust events and actual unjust events on the ground that I overlook the connection between simulations and that which they simulate. I argue that this purported moral connection can only be understood as either the result of a necessary psychological disposition or as a "magical," metaphysical attachment, neither of which is defensible or satisfactory.
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  17. Patrick D. Hopkins (1994). Rethinking Sadomasochism: Feminism, Interpretation, and Simulation. Hypatia 9 (1):116 - 141.
    In reexamining the "sex war" debates between radical feminists and lesbian feminist sadomasochists, I find that the actual practice of sadomasochism provides the basis for a philosophically more complex position than has been articulated. In response to the anti-SM radical perspective, I develop a distinction between simulation and replication of patriarchal dominant/submissive activities. In light of this important epistemological and ethical distinction, I claim that the radical feminist opposition to SM needs reassessment.
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