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  1. Norman E. Bowie & Patrick E. Murphy (forthcoming). Natural Cereals. Business Ethics:477.
     
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  2. Magdalena Öberseder, Bodo B. Schlegelmilch, Patrick E. Murphy & Verena Gruber (forthcoming). Consumers' Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility: Scale Development and Validation. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  3. Andrea J. S. Stanaland, May O. Lwin & Patrick E. Murphy (2011). Consumer Perceptions of the Antecedents and Consequences of Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):47-55.
    Perceptions of a firm’s stance on corporate social responsibility (CSR) are influenced by its corporate marketing efforts including branding, reputation building, and communications. The current research examines CSR from the consumer’s perspective, focusing on antecedents and consequences of perceived CSR. The findings strongly support the fact that particular cues, namely perceived financial performance and perceived quality of ethics statements, influence perceived CSR which in turn impacts perceptions of corporate reputation, consumer trust, and loyalty. Both consumer trust and loyalty were also (...)
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  4. Patrick E. Murphy (2010). Marketing Ethics. In Michael John Baker & Michael Saren (eds.), Marketing Theory: A Student Text. Sage. 83.
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  5. Gene R. Laczniak & Patrick E. Murphy (2009). Marketing, Consumers and Technology. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):313-321.
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  6. Patrick E. Murphy (2009). Review of George G. Brenkert, Marketing Ethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).
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  7. Patrick E. Murphy (2009). The Relevance of Responsibility to Ethical Business Decisions. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):245 - 252.
    This article reviews the concept of moral responsibility in business ethics and examines the seven previous articles using several types of responsibility in business as the overriding construct to gain a fuller understanding of the ethical impact of these articles. The types of responsibility that are used in this analysis are: legal, corporate, managerial, social, stakeholder, and societal. Observations about how normative ethical principles might also be applied to these articles are also advanced. This article concludes with a call for (...)
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  8. Nil Özçaǧlar-Toulouse, Amina Béji-Bécheur & Patrick E. Murphy (2009). Fair Trade in France: From Individual Innovators to Contemporary Networks. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):589 - 606.
    Fair trade aims at humanising the capitalist economy by serving the community, instead of simply striving for financial profit. The current fair trade sector is an excellent example of an innovation where networks based on ethical principles can help to effectively serve this market. Our analysis is based on 48 interviews amongst fair trade innovators in France and illustrates the advent of a new type of entrepreneur, one that is grounded in the social and solidarity economy (SSE). Based on a (...)
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  9. Eleanor O'Higgins & Patrick E. Murphy (2007). When Does Business Ethics Pay-And When Doesn't It? Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:76-82.
    This paper examines moral misconduct and recidivism at the corporate level. We analyze the factors that facilitate moral transgressions and why some companies appear to be serial offenders. We propose that negative learning is a core process that encourages repeat misconduct. We offer a framework of negative learning, grounded in a case example. The framework also suggests circumstances that reverse the vicious selfreinforcing cycle of negative learning, so companies learn to adopt a more ethical stance when faced with moral choices.
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  10. Eleanor O.’Higgins & Patrick E. Murphy (2007). When Does Business Ethics Pay - And When Doesn't It? Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:76-82.
    This paper examines moral misconduct and recidivism at the corporate level. We analyze the factors that facilitate moral transgressions and why some companies appear to be serial offenders. We propose that negative learning is a core process that encourages repeat misconduct. We offer a framework of negative learning, grounded in a case example. The framework also suggests circumstances that reverse the vicious selfreinforcing cycle of negative learning, so companies learn to adopt a more ethical stance when faced with moral choices.
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  11. Robert Audi & Patrick E. Murphy (2006). The Many Faces of Integrity. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (1):3-21.
    Integrity is a central topic in business ethics, and in the world of business it is quite possibly the most commonly cited morally desirable trait. But integrity is conceived in widely differing ways, and as often as it is discussed in the literature and given a central place in corporate ethics statements, the notion is used so variously that its value in guiding everyday conduct may be more limited than is generally supposed. Two central questions for this paper are what (...)
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  12. Gene R. Laczniak & Patrick E. Murphy (2006). Marketing, Consumers and Technology: Perspectives for Enhancing Ethical Transactions. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):313-322.
    Abstract: The advance of technology has influenced marketing in a number of ways that have ethical implications. Growth in use of the Internet and e-commerce has placed electronic “cookies,” spyware, spam, RFIDs, and data mining at the forefront of the ethical debate. Some marketers have minimized the significance of these trends. This overview paper examines these issues and introduces the two articles that follow. It is hoped that these entries will further the important “marketing and technology” ethical debate.
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  13. Patrick E. Murphy (2005). Developing, Communicating and Promoting Corporate Ethics Statements: A Longitudinal Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):183 - 189.
    This paper reports on the findings of the third in a series of surveys of large U.S.-based and multinational corporations on their ethics statements. Focusing on four types – values statement, corporate credo, code of ethics and Internet privacy policy – we find growth in the use of these statements over the last decade. We discuss the external communication of these statements, including the avenues that are now used for promotion and their intended audiences. The paper concludes with a number (...)
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  14. Patrick E. Murphy (2005). Sustainable Marketing. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 24 (1/2):171-198.
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  15. Patrick E. Murphy (ed.) (2004). Business Ethics. Wiley.
    If there’s one thing the Enron fiasco and other recent corporate ethical violations have proven, it’s that it’s time to reexamine how we do business. That’s why Fast Company magazine looks to the organizations and people who are rewriting the rules and reinventing business. Fast Company is the place to turn for influential voices on the future of business and innovative solutions to real problems in the post-Enron World. Now you can get the latest thinking on business ethics and corporate (...)
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  16. Peggy H. Cunningham, Debbie Thorne LeClair & Patrick E. Murphy (2000). Introduction. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (3).
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  17. Patrick E. Murphy (1999). Character and Virtue Ethics in International Marketing: An Agenda for Managers, Researchers and Educators. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 18 (1):107 - 124.
    This article examines the applicability of character and virtue ethics to international marketing. The historical background of this field, dimensions of virtue ethics and its relationship to other ethical theories are explained. Five core virtues – integrity, fairness, trust, respect and empathy – are suggested as especially relevant for marketing in a multicultural and multinational context. Implications are drawn for marketing scholars, practitioners and educators.
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  18. Patrick E. Murphy (ed.) (1998). Eighty Exemplary Ethics Statements. University of Notre Dame Press.
     
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  19. Eugene R. Laczniak & Patrick E. Murphy (1995). [Book Review] Ethical Marketing Decisions, the Higher Road. [REVIEW] Business Ethics Quarterly 5:895-898.
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  20. Patrick E. Murphy (1995). Corporate Ethics Statements: Current Status and Future Prospects. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (9):727 - 740.
    This paper reports on a study of large U.S. based corporations concerning the status of formal ethics statements. Almost all responding firms (91%) have promulgated a formal code of ethics while one-half have published values statements and about one-third have a corporate credo. Analysis of these statements concentrated on to whom they are communicated; whether codes of ethics contain information pertinent to the industry, include sanctions for violations and provide specific guidance regarding gifts. Conclusions and implications for managers and researchers (...)
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  21. Patrick E. Murphy & Georges Enderle (1995). Managerial Ethical Leadership. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (1):117-128.
    The central role of corporate leaders in setting the ethical tone for their organization is widely accepted. Four well known former CEOs are profiled to illustrate how their managerial ethical leadership not only influenced their firms but also the practice of business. Insights are drawn from their writings and speeches as well as other sources which examine demonstrated leadership abilities. Their behavior not only provides examples of leadership but also is exemplary from an ethical point of view. The article concludes (...)
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  22. Patrick E. Murphy (1994). Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (3):383-389.
    If there’s one thing the Enron fiasco and other recent corporate ethical violations have proven, it’s that it’s time to reexamine how we do business. That’s why Fast Company magazine looks to the organizations and people who are rewriting the rules and reinventing business. Fast Company is the place to turn for influential voices on the future of business and innovative solutions to real problems in the post-Enron World. Now you can get the latest thinking on business ethics and corporate (...)
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  23. Patrick E. Murphy (1994). European Managers'views on Corporate Ethics. Business Ethics 3 (3):137–144.
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  24. Gene R. Laczniak & Patrick E. Murphy (1991). Fostering Ethical Marketing Decisions. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (4):259 - 271.
    This paper begins by examining several potentially unethical recent marketing practices. Since most marketing managers face ethical dilemmas during their careers, it is essential to study the moral consequences of these decisions. A typology of ways that managers might confront ethical issues is proposed. The significant organizational, personal and societal costs emanting from unethical behavior are also discussed. Both relatively simple frameworks and more comprehensive models for evaluating ethical decisions in marketing are summarized. Finally, the fact that organizational commitment to (...)
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