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Patrick H. Byrne [20]Patrick Hugh Byrne [1]
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Profile: Patrick Byrne (Montclair State University)
  1. Patrick H. Byrne (2013). Spirit of Wonder, Spirit of Love: Reflections on the Work of Bernard Lonergan. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 1 (2):67-84.
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  2. Patrick H. Byrne (2011). Is the Universe on Our Side? Scientific Understanding and Religious Faith. The Lonergan Review 3 (1):140-161.
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  3. Patrick H. Byrne (2010). The Economy: Mistaken Expectations. The Lonergan Review 2 (1):10-34.
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  4. Patrick H. Byrne (2007). Lonergan, Evolutionary Science, and Intelligent Design. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 63 (4):893 - 918.
    This article shows how Bernard Lonergan's philosophy of science can bring resolution to a recent controversy: the controversy that arises from Intelligent Design theorists' and proponents of neo-Darwinian evolution. Intelligent Design theories argue that the complex structures of living organisms cannot be adequately explained by neo-Darwinian theories, especially by its postulate of random variations. Hence, an "intelligent designer" must be postulated in order to fill out scientific explanations. This article finds fault with the Intelligent Design arguments, but proposes a different (...)
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  5. Patrick H. Byrne (2007). The Goodness of Being in Lonergan's Insight. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (1):43-72.
    One of the lesser known features of Bernard Lonergan’s Insight is his theory of the relationship between being and goodness. Central to that theory is his claimthat the totality of being is good. From this central claim, Lonergan worked out an “ontology of the good,” in which the structures of ontological interdependencyare reflected in a theory of the scale of higher and lower values. Unfortunately, Lonergan’s way of supporting his claim in Insight is problematic. This article firstsummarizes Lonergan’s theory of (...)
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  6. Patrick H. Byrne (2006). Developing the Lonergan Legacy. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (4):511-512.
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  7. Patrick H. Byrne (2006). Statistical and Causal Concepts in Einstein's Early Thought. Annals of Science 37 (2):215-228.
    Albert Einstein's attitude towards quantum mechanics—and statistical physics in general—was a puzzle to many of his contemporaries, and has remained a puzzle to the present. Though he made many significant contributions to statistical physics, he continually refused to regard that branch of science as fundamental. The present essay demonstrates that his attitude towards statistical physics was formed during his earliest investigations—between 1901 and 1903. In particular, it is shown that in Einstein's view, statistical laws are based upon non-statistical assumptions. This (...)
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  8. Patrick H. Byrne (2006). The Origins of Einstein's Use of Formal Asymmetries. Annals of Science 38 (2):191-206.
    Several authors have used the expression ‘formal asymmetry’ to characterize Einstein's method of introducing conceptual innovations. Prior to his use of formal asymmetries, however, Einstein relied upon analogy to introduce his major concepts, but without satisfactory results. He gradually refined another technique, reflection upon empirical problems, into the method of formal asymmetries, with impressive results. This historical study, based upon a textual analysis of Einstein's publications, raises a series of questions regarding the place of formal asymmetries in his work.
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  9. Patrick H. Byrne (2003). Statistics as Science: Lonergan, McShane, and Popper. Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 3:55-75.
    On this occasion of honouring the achievement of Philip McShane, I would like to recall his earliest and, in my judgment, most important work, Randomness, Statistics and Emergence. In particular, I will recall how that work situated Lonergan’s important breakthrough on statistical method in relation to the major currents of thought on the subject, many of which remain influential still today.
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  10. Patrick H. Byrne (2002). Lonergan's Retrieval of Aristotelian Form. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (3):371-392.
    Lonergan’s written reflections on the notion of form span almost thirty years. Beginning with his 1930s manuscripts on the philosophy of history, Lonergan returned again and again to the problem of clarifying that metaphysical concept. His thought on the issue of form reached its mature stage in 1957 with the publication of Insight. This article first presents an account of the mature, Insight stage of Lonergan’s notion of form. It then shows how Lonergan arrived at that position from his interpretation (...)
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  11. Patrick H. Byrne (2001). Connective Analysis: Aristotle and Strawson. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (3):405 – 423.
  12. Patrick H. Byrne (1999). Insight, Inference, and Aristotle's Theory of Demonstration. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 73:237-250.
  13. Patrick H. Byrne (1997). Analysis and Science in Aristotle. State University of New York Press.
    Presents a new interpretation of Aristotle's Analytics (the Prior and Posterior Analytics) as a unified whole, and argues that to "loose up" or solve—rather than to reduce or break up—is the principle meaning which best characterizes the Analytics.
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  14. Patrick H. Byrne (1997). Phronēsis and Commonsense Judgment. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 71:163-177.
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  15. Patrick H. Byrne (1995). Commentary onMcKirahan. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):298-306.
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  16. Patrick H. Byrne (1988). Mystery and Modern Mathematics. Lonergan Workshop 7:1-33.
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  17. Patrick H. Byrne (1982). The Thomist Sources of Lonergan's Dynamic World-View. The Thomist 46 (1):108.
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  18. Patrick H. Byrne (1981). God and the Statistical Universe. Zygon 16 (4):345-363.
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  19. Patrick H. Byrne (1981). Relativity and Indeterminism. Foundations of Physics 11 (11-12):913-932.
    It is well known that Albert Einstein adhered to a deterministic world view throughout his career. Nevertheless, his developments of the special and general theories of relativity prove to be incompatible with that world view. Two different forms of determinism—classical Laplacian determinism and the determinism of isolated systems—are considered. Through careful considerations of what concretely is involved in predicting future states of the entire universe, or of isolated systems, it is shown that the demands of the theories of relativity make (...)
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  20. Patrick H. Byrne (1980). The Significance of Einstein's Use of the History of Science. Dialectica 34 (4):263-276.
    SummaryEinstein frequently used the historical narrative form to express his philosophical and even scientific ideas. Analysis of his historical writings reveals that he employed a distinctive historical method which may be designated an “intuitive archeology”, following one of his examples. It will be shown that his historical method was consistently directed toward the goal of freeing ongoing scientific research from arbitrary restrictions. He regarded these arbitrary restrictions, in turn, to be the result of a loss of recollection of the origins (...)
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