16 found
Sort by:
See also:
  1. Patrick R. Frierson (forthcoming). Maria Montessori’s Philosophy of Experimental Psychology. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science:000-000.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Patrick R. Frierson (forthcoming). The Virtue Epistemology of Maria Montessori. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-20.
    This paper shows how Maria Montessori's thought can enrich contemporary virtue epistemology. After a short overview of her ‘interested empiricist’ epistemological framework, I discuss four representative intellectual virtues: sensory acuity, physical dexterity, intellectual love, and intellectual humility. Throughout, I show how Montessori bridges the divide between reliabilist and responsibilist approaches to the virtues and how her particular treatments of virtues offer distinctive and compelling alternatives to contemporary accounts. For instance, she emphasizes how sensory acuity is a virtue for which one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Patrick R. Frierson (2015). Making Room for Children's Autonomy: Maria Montessori's Case for Seeing Children's Incapacity for Autonomy as an External Failing. Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (2).
    This article draws on Martha Nussbaum's distinction between basic, internal, and external capacities to better specify possible locations for children's ‘incapacity’ for autonomy. I then examine Maria Montessori's work on what she calls ‘normalization’, which involves a release of children's capacities for autonomy and self-governance made possible by being provided with the right kind of environment. Using Montessori, I argue that, in contrast to many ordinary and philosophical assumptions, children's incapacities for autonomy are best understood as consequences of an absence (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Patrick R. Frierson (2014). Kant's Empirical Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
    Throughout his life, Kant was concerned with questions about empirical psychology. He aimed to develop an empirical account of human beings, and his lectures and writings on the topic are recognizable today as properly 'psychological' treatments of human thought and behavior. In this book Patrick R. Frierson uses close analysis of relevant texts, including unpublished lectures and notes, to study Kant's account. He shows in detail how Kant explains human action, choice, and thought in empirical terms, and how a better (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Patrick R. Frierson (2014). Maria Montessori's Epistemology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (4):767-791.
    This paper lays out the epistemology of Maria Montessori . I start with what I call Montessori's ‘interested empiricism’, her empiricist emphasis on the foundational role of the senses combined with her insistence that all cognition is infused with ‘interest’. I then discuss the unconscious. Partly because of her emphasis on early childhood, Montessori puts great emphasis on unconscious cognitive processes and develops a conceptual vocabulary to make sense of the continuity between conscious and unconscious processes. The final sections turn (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Patrick R. Frierson (2013). What is the Human Being? Routledge.
    Philosophers, anthropologists and biologists have long puzzled over the question of human nature. It is also a question that Kant thought about deeply and returned to in many of his writings. In this lucid and wide-ranging introduction to Kant’s philosophy of human nature - which is essential for understanding his thought as a whole - Patrick R. Frierson assesses Kant’s theories and examines his critics. He begins by explaining how Kant articulates three ways of addressing the question ‘what is the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Patrick R. Frierson (2007). Review: Dean, The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (4).
  8. Patrick R. Frierson (2006). Adam Smith and the Possibility of Sympathy with Nature. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):442–480.
    As J. Baird Callicott has argued, Adam Smith's moral theory is a philosophical ancestor of recent work in environmental ethics. However, Smith's "all important emotion of sympathy" (Callicott, 2001, p. 209) seems incapable of extension to entities that lack emotions with which one can sympathize. Drawing on the distinctive account of sympathy developed in Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments, as well as his account of anthropomorphizing nature in "History of Astronomy and Physics," I show that sympathy with non-sentient nature is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Patrick R. Frierson (2006). Character and Evil in Kant's Moral Anthropology. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):623-634.
    In the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant explains that moral anthropology studies the “subjective conditions in human nature that help or hinder [people] in fulfilling the laws of a metaphysics of morals” and insists that such anthropology “cannot be dispensed with” (6:217).1 But it is often difficult to find clear evidence of this sort of anthropology in Kant’s own works. in this paper, i discuss Kant’s account of character as an example of Kantian moral anthropology.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Patrick R. Frierson (2006). Symbolic Representation in Kant's Practical Philosophy. Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):232-238.
  11. Patrick R. Frierson (2005). Kant's Empirical Account of Human Action. Philosophers' Imprint 5 (7):1-34.
    In the first Critique, Kant says, “[A]ll the actions of a human being are determined in accord with the order of nature,” adding that “if we could investigate all the appearances . . . there would be no human action we could not predict with certainty.” Most Kantian treatments of human action discuss action from a practical perspective, according to which human beings are transcendentally free, and thus do not sufficiently lay out this Kant’s empirical, causal description of human action. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Patrick R. Frierson (2003). Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive account of Kant's theory of freedom and his moral anthropology. The point of departure is the apparent conflict between three claims to which Kant is committed: that human beings are transcendentally free, that moral anthropology studies the empirical influences on human beings, and that more anthropology is morally relevant. Frierson shows why this conflict is only apparent. He draws on Kant's transcendental idealism and his theory of the will and describes how empirical influences can (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Patrick R. Frierson (2003). Theodor W. Adorno, Can One Live After Auschwitz? A Philosophical Reader, Trans. Rodney Livingstone and Others, Ed. Rolf Tiedmann (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2003). Julian Baggini, Making Sense (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003). [REVIEW] Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 24 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Patrick R. Frierson (2001). Cartesian Metaphysics: The Scholastic Origins of Modern Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):292-294.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Patrick R. Frierson (2000). Descartes and Method: A Search for a Method in Meditations (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (3):436-437.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Patrick R. Frierson (2000). Ideas and Mechanism: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (1):125-126.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation