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  1. Patrick R. Frierson (forthcoming). Maria Montessori's Epistemology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-25.
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  2. Patrick R. Frierson (2013). What is the Human Being? Routledge.
    Philosophers, anthropologists and biologists have long puzzled over the question of human nature. It is also a question that Kant thought about deeply and returned to in many of his writings. In this lucid and wide-ranging introduction to Kant’s philosophy of human nature - which is essential for understanding his thought as a whole - Patrick R. Frierson assesses Kant’s theories and examines his critics. He begins by explaining how Kant articulates three ways of addressing the question ‘what is the (...)
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  3. Patrick R. Frierson (2007). Review: Dean, The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (4).
  4. Patrick R. Frierson (2006). Adam Smith and the Possibility of Sympathy with Nature. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):442–480.
    As J. Baird Callicott has argued, Adam Smith's moral theory is a philosophical ancestor of recent work in environmental ethics. However, Smith's "all important emotion of sympathy" (Callicott, 2001, p. 209) seems incapable of extension to entities that lack emotions with which one can sympathize. Drawing on the distinctive account of sympathy developed in Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments, as well as his account of anthropomorphizing nature in "History of Astronomy and Physics," I show that sympathy with non-sentient nature is (...)
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  5. Patrick R. Frierson (2006). Character and Evil in Kant's Moral Anthropology. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):623-634.
    In the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant explains that moral anthropology studies the “subjective conditions in human nature that help or hinder [people] in fulfilling the laws of a metaphysics of morals” and insists that such anthropology “cannot be dispensed with” (6:217).1 But it is often difficult to find clear evidence of this sort of anthropology in Kant’s own works. in this paper, i discuss Kant’s account of character as an example of Kantian moral anthropology.
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  6. Patrick R. Frierson (2006). Symbolic Representation in Kant's Practical Philosophy. Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):232-238.
  7. Patrick R. Frierson (2005). Kant's Empirical Account of Human Action. Philosophers' Imprint 5 (7):1-34.
    In the first Critique, Kant says, “[A]ll the actions of a human being are determined in accord with the order of nature,” adding that “if we could investigate all the appearances . . . there would be no human action we could not predict with certainty.” Most Kantian treatments of human action discuss action from a practical perspective, according to which human beings are transcendentally free, and thus do not sufficiently lay out this Kant’s empirical, causal description of human action. (...)
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  8. Patrick R. Frierson (2003). Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive account of Kant's theory of freedom and his moral anthropology. The point of departure is the apparent conflict between three claims to which Kant is committed: that human beings are transcendentally free, that moral anthropology studies the empirical influences on human beings, and that more anthropology is morally relevant. Frierson shows why this conflict is only apparent. He draws on Kant's transcendental idealism and his theory of the will and describes how empirical influences can (...)
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  9. Patrick R. Frierson (2003). Theodor W. Adorno, Can One Live After Auschwitz? A Philosophical Reader, Trans. Rodney Livingstone and Others, Ed. Rolf Tiedmann (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2003). Julian Baggini, Making Sense (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003). [REVIEW] Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 24 (2).
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  10. Patrick R. Frierson (2001). Cartesian Metaphysics: The Scholastic Origins of Modern Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):292-294.
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  11. Patrick R. Frierson (2000). Descartes and Method: A Search for a Method in Meditations (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (3):436-437.
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  12. Patrick R. Frierson (2000). Ideas and Mechanism: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (1):125-126.
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