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Profile: Paul Bartha (University of British Columbia)
  1.  62
    Paul F. A. Bartha (2010). By Parallel Reasoning: The Construction and Evaluation of Analogical Arguments. Oxford University Press.
    Analogical arguments -- Philosophical theories -- Computational theories -- The articulation model -- Analogies in mathematics -- Similarity and patterns of generalization -- Analogy and epistemic values -- Analogy and symmetry -- A wider role for analogies.
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  2.  12
    Paul Bartha & C. Tyler DesRoches (forthcoming). The Relatively Infinite Value of the Environment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-26.
    ABSTRACTSome environmental ethicists and economists argue that attributing infinite value to the environment is a good way to represent an absolute obligation to protect it. Others argue against modelling the value of the environment in this way: the assignment of infinite value leads to immense technical and philosophical difficulties that undermine the environmentalist project. First, there is a problem of discrimination: saving a large region of habitat is better than saving a small region; yet if both outcomes have infinite value, (...)
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  3.  5
    Paul F. A. Bartha (2016). Making Do Without Expectations. Mind 125 (499):799-827.
    The Pasadena game invented by Nover and Hájek raises a number of challenges for decision theory. The basic problem is how the game should be evaluated: it has no expectation and hence no well-defined value. Easwaran has shown that the Pasadena game does have a weak expectation, raising the possibility that we can eliminate the value gap by requiring agents to value gambles at their weak expectations. In this paper, I first prove a negative result: there are gambles like the (...)
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  4. Paul Bartha (2007). Taking Stock of Infinite Value: Pascal's Wager and Relative Utilities. Synthese 154 (1):5 - 52.
    Among recent objections to Pascal’s Wager, two are especially compelling. The first is that decision theory, and specifically the requirement of maximizing expected utility, is incompatible with infinite utility values. The second is that even if infinite utility values are admitted, the argument of the Wager is invalid provided that we allow mixed strategies. Furthermore, Hájek (Philosophical Review 112, 2003) has shown that reformulations of Pascal’s Wager that address these criticisms inevitably lead to arguments that are philosophically unsatisfying and historically (...)
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  5. Paul Bartha (2004). Countable Additivity and the de Finetti Lottery. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (2):301-321.
    De Finetti would claim that we can make sense of a draw in which each positive integer has equal probability of winning. This requires a uniform probability distribution over the natural numbers, violating countable additivity. Countable additivity thus appears not to be a fundamental constraint on subjective probability. It does, however, seem mandated by Dutch Book arguments similar to those that support the other axioms of the probability calculus as compulsory for subjective interpretations. These two lines of reasoning can be (...)
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  6. Paul Bartha & Christopher Hitchcock (1999). No One Knows the Date or the Hour: An Unorthodox Application of Rev. Bayes's Theorem. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):353.
    Carter and Leslie (1996) have argued, using Bayes's theorem, that our being alive now supports the hypothesis of an early 'Doomsday'. Unlike some critics (Eckhardt 1997), we accept their argument in part: given that we exist, our existence now indeed favors 'Doom sooner' over 'Doom later'. The very fact of our existence, however, favors 'Doom later'. In simple cases, a hypothetical approach to the problem of 'old evidence' shows that these two effects cancel out: our existence now yields no information (...)
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  7.  37
    Paul Bartha, John Barker & Alan Hájek (2014). Satan, Saint Peter and Saint Petersburg. Synthese 191 (4):629-660.
    We examine a distinctive kind of problem for decision theory, involving what we call discontinuity at infinity. Roughly, it arises when an infinite sequence of choices, each apparently sanctioned by plausible principles, converges to a ‘limit choice’ whose utility is much lower than the limit approached by the utilities of the choices in the sequence. We give examples of this phenomenon, focusing on Arntzenius et al.’s Satan’s apple, and give a general characterization of it. In these examples, repeated dominance reasoning (...)
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  8.  55
    Paul Bartha & Christopher Hitchcock (1999). The Shooting-Room Paradox and Conditionalizing on Measurably Challenged Sets. Synthese 118 (3):403-437.
    We provide a solution to the well-known “Shooting-Room” paradox, developed by John Leslie in connection with his Doomsday Argument. In the “Shooting-Room” paradox, the death of an individual is contingent upon an event that has a 1/36 chance of occurring, yet the relative frequency of death in the relevant population is 0.9. There are two intuitively plausible arguments, one concluding that the appropriate subjective probability of death is 1/36, the other that this probability is 0.9. How are these two values (...)
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  9.  54
    Paul Bartha & Richard Johns (2001). Probability and Symmetry. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S109-.
    The Principle of Indifference, which dictates that we ought to assign two outcomes equal probability in the absence of known reasons to do otherwise, is vulnerable to well-known objections. Nevertheless, the appeal of the principle, and of symmetry-based assignments of equal probability, persists. We show that, relative to a given class of symmetries satisfying certain properties, we are justified in calling certain outcomes equally probable, and more generally, in defining what we call relative probabilities. Relative probabilities are useful in providing (...)
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  10. Paul Bartha (2008). Review: Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God – Jeff Jordan. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):571–574.
  11.  81
    Paul Bartha & Steven F. Savitt (1998). Second-Guessing Second Nature. Analysis 58 (4):252–263.
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  12. Paul Bartha (2009). By Parallel Reasoning. Oxford University Press Usa.
    By Parallel Reasoning is the first comprehensive philosophical examination of analogical reasoning in more than forty years designed to formulate and justify standards for the critical evaluation of analogical arguments. It proposes a normative theory with special focus on the use of analogies in mathematics and science. In recent decades, research on analogy has been dominated by computational theories whose objective has been to model analogical reasoning as a psychological process. These theories have devoted little attention to normative questions. In (...)
     
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  13.  28
    Paul Bartha (2012). Pascal's Wager Meets the Replicator Dynamics. In Jake Chandler Victoria S. Harrison (ed.), Probability in the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford 187.
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  14.  64
    Paul Bartha, How to Put Self-Locating Information in its Place.
    How can self-locating propositions be integrated into normal patterns of belief revision? Puzzles such as Sleeping Beauty seem to show that such propositions lead to violation of ordinary principles for reasoning with subjective probability, such as Conditionalization and Reflection. I show that sophisticated forms of Conditionalization and Reflection are not only compatible with self-locating propositions, but also indispensable in understanding how they can function as evidence in Sleeping Beauty and similar cases.
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  15.  1
    Paul Bartha & Richard Johns (2001). Probability and Symmetry. Philosophy of Science 68 (S3):S109-S122.
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  16.  9
    Paul Bartha (2001). Monstrous Neighbors or Curious Coincidence: Aristotle on Boundaries and Contact. History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (1):1 - 16.
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  17. Paul Bartha (1998). Domenico Costantini and Maria Carla Galavotti, Eds., Probability, Dynamics and Causality: Essays in Honour of Richard C. Jeffrey Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 18 (5):321-323.
     
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  18.  4
    Paul Bartha (2013). Analogical Arguments in Mathematics. In Andrew Aberdein & Ian J. Dove (eds.), The Argument of Mathematics. Springer 199--237.
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  19.  10
    Paul Bartha (2001). Book Review:Visual Analogy: Consciousness as the Art of Connecting Barbara Maria Stafford. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 68 (4):580-.
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  20.  9
    Paul Bartha (2002). Review of John F. Horty, Agency and Deontic Logic. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (2).
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  21.  5
    Paul Bartha (2004). Review of Brown. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 71 (4):610-614.
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  22. Paul Bartha (1993). Substantial Form and the Nature of Individual Substance. Studia Leibnitiana 25 (1):43-54.
    Qu'est-ce qui explique l'unité d'une substance leibnizienne, au-dessus des attributs compris dans sa notion individuelle complète? C'est une question commune dans la littérature sur la notion de la substance chez Leibniz. Cet article soutient qu'elle n'admette pas de réponse consistante dans le système leibnizien. Premièrement, je discute la manière dans laquelle Leibniz a essayé de répondre à la question en „rehabillitant" a les formes substantielles des scholastiques. Puis je cherche à montrer que ça lui a ammené à une conception composée (...)
     
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  23. Paul Bartha (2005). 9. The de Finetti Lottery and Equiprobability. In Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine (eds.), Mistakes of Reason: Essays in Honour of John Woods. University of Toronto Press 158-172.
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