6 found
Order:
  1. Paul E. Sigmund (1971). Natural Law in Political Thought. University Press of America.
    Originally published in 1971 by Winthrop Publishers, Inc., this volume provides a discussion and analysis of the theory of natural law as it appears in contemporary political and social thought. This theory of natural law was used from the fifth century B.C. until the end of the eighteenth century to provide a universal, rational standard to determine the nature and limits of political obligation, the evaluation of competing forms of government, and the relation of law and politics to morals.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2.  2
    Paul E. Sigmund (1989). Polarization and Legitimacy in Latin America. Ethics and International Affairs 3 (1):245–260.
    Sigmund examines aspects of democratic transformation in Latin America, emphasizing that these transitions occurred despite the absence of the accepted cultural and economic preconditions for democracy.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Paul E. Sigmund (1969). Das Fortleben des Nikolaus von Kues in der Geschichte des politischen Denkens. Mitteilungen Und Forschungsbeiträge der Cusanus-Gesellschaft 7:120-128.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Paul E. Sigmund (1993). 8 Law and Politics. In Norman Kretzmann & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Aquinas. Cambridge University Press 217.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Paul E. Sigmund (2002). Law and Politics. In Brian Davies (ed.), Thomas Aquinas: Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives. OUP Usa
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Paul E. Sigmund (1981). Natural Law in Political Thought. Upa.
    Originally published in 1971 by Winthrop Publishers, Inc., this volume provides a discussion and analysis of the theory of natural law as it appears in contemporary political and social thought. This theory of natural law was used from the fifth century B.C. until the end of the eighteenth century to provide a universal, rational standard to determine the nature and limits of political obligation, the evaluation of competing forms of government, and the relation of law and politics to morals.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography