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  1. Paul H. Robinson, Natural Law & Lawlessness: Modern Lessons From Pirates, Lepers, Eskimos, and Survivors.
    The natural experiments of history present an opportunity to test Hobbes' view of government and law as the wellspring of social order. Groups have found themselves in a wide variety of situations in which no governmental law existed, from shipwrecks to gold mining camps to failed states. Yet the wide variety of situations show common patterns among the groups in their responses to their often difficult circumstances. Rather than survival of the fittest, a more common reaction is social cooperation and (...)
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  2. Paul H. Robinson, The Role of Moral Philosophers in the Competition Between Deontological and Empirical Desert.
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  3. Paul H. Robinson & Robert O. Kurzban, Concordance & Conflict in Intuitions of Justice.
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  4. Paul H. Robinson & John M. Darley (2004). Does Criminal Law Deter? A Behavioural Science Investigation. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 24 (2):173-205.
    Having a criminal justice system that imposes sanctions no doubt does deter criminal conduct. But available social science research suggests that manipulating criminal law rules within that system to achieve heightened deterrence effects generally will be ineffective. Potential offenders often do not know of the legal rules. Even if they do, they frequently are unable to bring this knowledge to bear in guiding their conduct, due to a variety of situational, social, or chemical factors. Even if they can, a rational (...)
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  5. Paul H. Robinson (2002). The Modern General Part: Three Illusions. In Stephen Shute & A. P. Simester (eds.), Criminal Law Theory: Doctrines of the General Part. Oxford University Press.
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  6. Paul H. Robinson & John M. Darley (1998). Objectivist Versus Subjectivist Views of Criminality: A Study in the Role of Social Science in Criminal Law Theory. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 18 (3):409-447.
    The authors use social science methodology to determine whether a doctrinal shift—from an objectivist view of criminality in the common law to a subjectivist view in modem criminal codes—is consistent with lay intuitions of the principles of justice. Commentators have suggested that lay perceptions of criminality have shifted in a way reflected in the doctrinal change, but the study results suggest a more nuanced conclusion: that the modern lay view agrees with the subjectivist view of modern codes in defining the (...)
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