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  1. Michael Goddard, Benjamin Halligan & Paul Hegarty (eds.) (2012). Reverberations: The Philosophy, Aesthetics and Politics of Noise. Continuum Intl Pub Group.
    Noise permeates our highly mediated and globalised cultures. Noise as art, music, cultural or digital practice is a way of intervening so that it can be harnessed for an aesthetic expression not caught within mainstream styles or distribution. This wide-ranging book examines the concept and practices of noise, treating noise not merely as a sonic phenomenon but as an essential component of all communication and information systems. The book opens with ideas of what noise is, and then works through ideas (...)
     
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  2. Patrick Crowley & Paul Hegarty (eds.) (2005). Formless: Ways in and Out of Form. Peter Lang.
    The paper in this volume challenge the concept of form and aim to set out, explore and develop different theories and examples of 'the formless'.
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  3. Paul Hegarty (2005). Supposing the Impossibility of Silence and Sound, of Voice: Bataille, Agamben, and the Holocaust. In Andrew Norris (ed.), Politics, Metaphysics, and Death: Essays on Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer. Duke University Press.
  4. Paul Hegarty (2000). Georges Bataille. Sage Publications.
    Long recognized in France as a central figure in French cultural thought, the range and significance of Batille's ideas are now being grasped in the English speaking world. His influence on Derrida, Foucault, Kristeva and Baudrillard is now more clearly understood and Bataille has emerged as a front-rank cultural theorist who posed questions and paradoxes that were extraordinarily prescient. This book offers a comprehensive and detailed presentation and analysis of the full range of his writings - political, philosophical, aesthetic, literary, (...)
     
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