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  1. Paul Hoffman (forthcoming). Cartesian Passions and Cartesian Dualism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    Descartes retains the Aristotelian doctrine that when an agent acts on a patient, the action of the agent is one and the same as the passion in the patient. However, unlike his Aristotelian predecessors who located the agent's action in the patient, Descartes locates the agent's action in the agent. I examine briefly his motives for modifying, but not abandoning this doctrine. My central claim is that his use of this doctrine implies that he thinks there are modes straddling mind (...)
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  2. Paul Hoffman (2012). Reasons, Causes, and Inclinations. In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 156.
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  3. Youngjin Lee, Brett M. Morrison, Yun Li, Sylvain Lengacher, Mohamed H. Farah, Paul N. Hoffman, Yiting Liu, Akivaga Tsingalia, Lin Jin & Ping-Wu Zhang (2012). Oligodendroglia Metabolically Support Axons and Contribute to Neurodegeneration. In Jeffrey Kastner (ed.), Nature. Mit Press. 443-448.
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  4. Paul Hoffman (2011). Hume on the Distinction of Reason. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1131 - 1141.
    This paper concerns Hume?s treatment of the distinction of reason in the Treatise, I.i.7. Many scholars have claimed that there is a tension between his account of the distinction of reason and his commitment to his so-called separability principle. I explain why Hume?s account of the distinction of reason is fully consistent with the principle, and show how other discussions, both critical of and sympathetic to Hume, fail to appreciate the radicalness of his position. I evaluate Hume?s bold position and (...)
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  5. Paul Hoffman (2009). Does Efficient Causation Presuppose Final Causation? Aquinas Vs. Early Modern Mechanism. In Samuel Newlands & Larry M. Jorgensen (eds.), Metaphysics and the Good: Themes From the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams. Oxford University Press.
     
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  6. Paul Hoffman (2009). Essays on Descartes. Oxford University Press.
    This is a collection of Paul Hoffman's wide-ranging essays on Descartes composed over the past twenty-five years. The essays in Part I include his celebrated "The Unity of Descartes' Man," in which he argues that Descartes accepts the Aristotelian view that soul and body are related as form to matter and that the human being is a substance; a series of subsequent essays elaborating on this interpretation and defending it against objections; and an essay on Descartes' theory of distinction. In (...)
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  7. Paul Hoffman (2008). Freedom and Weakness of Will. Ratio 21 (1):42–54.
    Can absolute freedom of will be defended by arguing that apparent cases of diminished freedom when we act out of passion are cases of weakness of will? Rogers Albritton thought so. What is intriguing about Albritton's view is that he thought when we act from desire we are making choices, yet our desires are not functioning as reasons for those choices. So our desires must be influencing our choices in some other unspecified way that does not diminish our freedom. I (...)
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  8. Paul Hoffman (2008). Getting the Goat. In Duncan Pritchard & Ram Neta (eds.), Arguing About Knowledge. Routledge. 146.
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  9. Paul Hoffman, David Owen & Gideon Yaffe (eds.) (2008). Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy: Essays in Honor of Vere Chappell. Broadview Press.
    The essays in this collection are all studies in the history of modern philosophy. Together they provide a cross-section of current efforts to reconstruct ...
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  10. Paul Hoffman (2007). Descartes's Watch Analogy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (3):561-567.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 15, 2007, pp. 561-567. (Author Posting. (c) Taylor & Francis, 2007. It is posted here by permission of Taylor & Francis for personal use, not for redistribution.).
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  11. Paul Hoffman (2006). Thomas Reid's Notion of Exertion. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):431-447.
    : Thomas Reid uses the notion of exertion in various ways that have not been distinguished in the secondary literature. Sometimes he uses it to refer to the exercise of a capacity or power, sometimes to the turning on or activitating of a capacity or power, and still other times to the attempt to activate a capacity or power. Getting clear on Reid's different uses of the term 'exertion' is essential to understanding his account of the sequence of events in (...)
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  12. Paul Hoffman (2005). Aquinas on Threats and Temptations. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):225–242.
    Aquinas maintains that when we succumb to temptation our actions are wholly voluntary. When we give up a good in the face of a threat our actions are partly involuntary, but they are more voluntary than involuntary. I argue that when we succumb to temptation our actions can also be partly involuntary. I also defend my intuition that in some mixed cases our action is more involuntary than voluntary, and I show how Aquinas’s psychological theory can explain this. Finally, I (...)
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  13. Paul Hoffman (2005). Locke on the Locked Room. Locke Studies 5:57-73.
  14. Paul Hoffman (2003). Plato on Appetitive Desires in the "Republic". Apeiron 36 (2):171 - 174.
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  15. Paul Hoffman (2003). The Passions and Freedom of the Will. In Byron Williston & André Gombay (eds.), Passion and Virtue in Descartes. Humanity Books. 261--99.
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  16. Paul Hoffman (2002). Direct Realism, Intentionality, and the Objective Being of Ideas. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):163-179.
    My aim is to arrive at a better understanding of the distinction between direct realism and representationalism by offering a critical analysis of Steven Nadler.
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  17. Paul Hoffman (2002). Descartes's Theory of Distinction. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (1):57-78.
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  18. Robert M. Adams, Janet Broughton, John Carriero, Michael Della Rocca, Daniel Garber, Don Garrett, Paul Hoffman, Christia Mercer, Steven Nadler, Marleen Rozemond, Donald Rutherford, Margaret D. Wilson & David Wong (1999). The Rationalists: Critical Essays on Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  19. Paul David Hoffman (1999). Cartesian Composites. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (2):251-270.
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  20. Paul Hoffman (1996). 'The Being of Leibnizian Phenomena. Studia Leibnitiana 28:108-18.
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  21. Paul David Hoffman (1996). Descartes on Misrepresentation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):357-381.
    I examine Descartes's theory of cognition, taking as a starting point his account of how misperception is possible. In the Third Meditation Descartes introduces the hypothesis that there are ideas (such as the idea of cold) which seem to be of something real but which in fact represent nothing (if, for example, cold is a privation or absence of heat, rather than the presence of a positive quality). I argue, against Margaret Wilson, that Descartes does not think there are any (...)
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  22. Paul Hoffman (1995). Freedom and Strength of Will: Descartes and Albritton. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 77 (2-3):241 - 260.
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  23. Paul Hoffman (1995). Responses to Chappell and Watson. Philosophical Studies 77 (2-3):283 - 292.
    Gary Watson raises at least three objections to my interpretation of Albritton. [1] First, he says that I intimate, he thinks, that Albritton overlooks the distinction between the input side and output side of will, whereas Albritton clearly is thinking of strength and weakness of will on the input side. I didn't mean to intimate that Albritton overlooks the distinction, but I can see how my remarks might easily be read that way. In any case, it is certainly true that (...)
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  24. John Martin Fischer & Paul Hoffman (1994). Alternative Possibilities: A Reply to Lamb. Journal of Philosophy 91 (6):321-326.
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  25. Paul Hoffman (1991). Three Dualist Theories of the Passions. Philosophical Topics 19 (1):153-200.
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  26. Paul Hoffman (1990). St. Thomas Aquinas on the Halfway State of Sensible Being. Philosophical Review 99 (1):73-92.
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  27. Paul Hoffman (1986). The Unity of Descartes's Man. Philosophical Review 95 (3):339-370.
    ne of the leading problems for Cartesian dualism is to provide an account of the union of mind and body. This problem is often construed to be one of explaining how thinking things and extended things can causally interact. That is, it needs to be explained how thoughts in the mind can produce motions in the body and how motions in the body can produce sensations, appetites, and emotions in the mind. The conclusion often drawn, as it was by three (...)
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  28. Paul Hoffman (1985). Kripke on Private Language. Philosophical Studies 47 (1):23-28.
  29. Panna Lal Pradham & Paul J. Hoffman (1963). Effect of Spacing and Range of Stimuli on Magnitude Estimation Judgements. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (6):533.
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