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  1. Paul J. M. Jorion (2000). The Elementary Units of Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):483-484.
    Examining the implications of a localist model for linguistic performance, I show the strengths of the P-graph, a network of elementary units of meaning where utterance results from relaxation through the operation of a dynamics of affect values. A unit of meaning is stored in a synaptic connection that brings together two words. Such a model, consistent with the anatomy and physiology of the neural tissue, eschews a number of traditional pitfalls of “semantic networks”: (1) ambiguity ceases to be an (...)
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  2. Paul J. M. Jorion (1999). Syntax, or, the Embryogenesis of Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):1027-1028.
    Syntax is better viewed as the dynamics of a morphogenetic field on a semantic universe of “content” words. This may take widely different forms, making the acquisition of any language by an aspiring speaker an entirely new experience. The existence of an underlying “universal syntax” might be illusory.
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  3. Paul J. M. Jorion (1999). Thought as Word Dynamics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):295-295.
    A Hebbian model for speech generation opens a number of paths. A cross-linguistic scheme of functional relationships (inspired by Aristotle) dispenses with distraction by the “parts of speech” distinctions, while bridging the gap between “content” and “structure” words. A gradient model identifies emotional and rational dynamics and shows speech generation as a process where a speaker's dissatisfaction gets minimized.
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  4. Paul J. M. Jorion (1999). The Uncanny Power of Words. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):622-623.
    In their quality as acoustic or visual percepts, words are linked to the emotional values of the state-of-affairs they evoke. This allows them to engender meanings capable of operating nearly entirely detached from percepts. Such a laying flat of meanings permits deliberation to take place within the window of consciousness. In such a theatre of the imagination, linguistically triggered, resides the originality of the human psyche.
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  5. Paul J. M. Jorion (1998). A Methodological Behaviourist Model for Imitation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):695-695.
    Byrne & Russon's target article displays all the difficulties encountered when one fails to take a methodological behaviourist approach to imitation. Their conceptual apparatus is grounded in a mixture of introspection and folk psychology. Their distinction between action-level and program-level imitation falters on goal imputation for sequential acts. In an alternative gradient descent model, behaviour can be simulated as a frustration/satisfaction gradient descent in the animal's “potentiality space,” as defined by knowledge, inventiveness, and the surrounding environment.
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