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  1. Paul L. Harris & Jonathan D. Lane (forthcoming). Infants Understand How Testimony Works. Topoi:1-16.
    Children learn about the world from the testimony of other people, often coming to accept what they are told about a variety of unobservable and indeed counter-intuitive phenomena. However, research on children’s learning from testimony has paid limited attention to the foundations of that capacity. We ask whether those foundations can be observed in infancy. We review evidence from two areas of research: infants’ sensitivity to the emotional expressions of other people; and their capacity to understand the exchange of information (...)
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  2. Kathleen H. Corriveau, Eva E. Chen & Paul L. Harris (2014). Judgments About Fact and Fiction by Children From Religious and Nonreligious Backgrounds. Cognitive Science 38 (7).
    In two studies, 5- and 6-year-old children were questioned about the status of the protagonist embedded in three different types of stories. In realistic stories that only included ordinary events, all children, irrespective of family background and schooling, claimed that the protagonist was a real person. In religious stories that included ordinarily impossible events brought about by divine intervention, claims about the status of the protagonist varied sharply with exposure to religion. Children who went to church or were enrolled in (...)
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  3. Patricia A. Herrmann, Cristine H. Legare, Paul L. Harris & Harvey Whitehouse (2013). Stick to the Script: The Effect of Witnessing Multiple Actors on Children's Imitation. Cognition 129 (3):536-543.
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  4. Paul L. Harris, Kathleen H. Corriveau, Elisabeth S. Pasquini, Melissa Koenig, Maria Fusaro & Fabrice Clément (2012). Credulity and the Development of Selective Trust in Early Childhood. In Michael Beran, Johannes Brandl, Josef Perner & Joëlle Proust (eds.), The Foundations of Metacognition. Oxford University Press. 193.
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  5. Kathleen H. Corriveau, Angie L. Kim, Courtney E. Schwalen & Paul L. Harris (2009). Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: Children's Differentiation Between Historical and Fantasy Characters. Cognition 113 (2):213-225.
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  6. Rita Astuti & Paul L. Harris (2008). Understanding Mortality and the Life of the Ancestors in Rural Madagascar. Cognitive Science 32 (4):713-740.
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  7. Paul L. Harris & Rebekah A. Richert (2008). William James, 'the World of Sense' and Trust in Testimony. Mind and Language 23 (5):536-551.
    Abstract: William James argued that we ordinarily think of the objects that we can observe—things that belong to 'the world of sense'—as having an unquestioned reality. However, young children also assert the existence of entities that they cannot ordinarily observe. For example, they assert the existence of germs and souls. The belief in the existence of such unobservable entities is likely to be based on children's broader trust in other people's testimony about objects and situations that they cannot directly observe (...)
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  8. Paul L. Harris & Melissa A. Koenig (2007). The Basis of Epistemic Trust: Reliable Testimony or Reliable Sources? Episteme 4 (3):264-284.
    What is the nature of children's trust in testimony? Is it based primarily on evidential correlations between statements and facts, as stated by Hume, or does it derive from an interest in the trustworthiness of particular speakers? In this essay, we explore these questions in an effort to understand the developmental course and cognitive bases of children's extensive reliance on testimony. Recent work shows that, from an early age, children monitor the reliability of particular informants, differentiate between those who make (...)
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  9. Paul L. Harris & Rita Astuti (2006). Learning That There is Life After Death. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):475-476.
    Bering's argument that human beings are endowed with a cognitive system dedicated to forming illusory representations of psychological immortality relies on the claim that children's beliefs in the afterlife are not the result of religious teaching. We suggest four reasons why this claim is unsatisfactory.
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  10. Melissa A. Koenig & Paul L. Harris (2005). The Role of Social Cognition in Early Trust. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10):457-459.
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  11. Paul L. Harris (2002). Checking Our Sources: The Origins of Trust in Testimony. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):315-333.
  12. Paul L. Harris (2002). 17 What Do Children Learn From Testimony? In Peter Carruthers, Stephen P. Stich & Michael Siegal (eds.), The Cognitive Basis of Science. Cambridge University Press. 316.
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  13. Paul L. Harris (2001). Thinking About the Unknown. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (11):494-498.
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  14. Paul L. Harris (2001). The Veridicality Assumption. Mind and Language 16 (3):247–262.
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  15. Fransisco Pons & Paul L. Harris (2001). Piaget's Conception of the Development of Consciousness: An Examination of Two Hypotheses. Human Development 44 (4):220-227.
     
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  16. Hilary J. Leevers & Paul L. Harris (1999). Persisting Effects of Instruction on Young Children's Syllogistic Reasoning with Incongruent and Abstract Premises. Thinking and Reasoning 5 (2):145 – 173.
    Studies of reasoning have often invoked a distinction between a natural or ordinary consideration of the premises, in which they are interpreted, and even distorted, in the light of empirical knowledge, and an analytic or logical consideration of the premises, in which they are analysed in a literal fashion for their logical implications. Two or three years of schooling have been seen as critical for the spontaneous use of analytic reasoning. In two experiments, however, 4-year-olds who were given brief instructions (...)
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  17. Maria Nunez & Paul L. Harris (1998). Psychological and Deontic Concepts: Separate Domains or Intimate Connection? Mind and Language 13 (2):153-170.
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  18. María Núñez & Paul L. Harris (1998). Psychological and Deontic Concepts: Separate Domains or Intimate Connection? Mind and Language 13 (2):153–170.
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  19. Stephen C. Want & Paul L. Harris (1998). Indices of Program-Level Comprehension. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):706-707.
    Byrne & Russon suggest that the production of action by primates is hierarchically organised. We assess the evidence for hierarchical structure in the comprehension of action by primates. Focusing on work with human children we evaluate several possible indices of program-level comprehension.
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  20. Paul L. Harris, Tim German & Patrick Mills (1996). Children's Use of Counterfactual Thinking in Causal Reasoning. Cognition 61 (3):233-259.
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  21. Paul L. Harris (1995). Imagining and Pretending. In Mental Simulation. Cambridge: Blackwell.
     
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  22. Paul L. Harris (1995). Mental Simulation. Cambridge: Blackwell.
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  23. Henry M. Wellman, Paul L. Harris, Mita Banerjee & Anna Sinclair (1995). Early Understanding of Emotion: Evidence From Natural Language. Cognition and Emotion 9 (2-3):117-149.
  24. Paul L. Harris (1993). First-Person Current. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):48.
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  25. Paul L. Harris (1992). From Simulation to Folk Psychology: The Case for Development. Mind and Language 7 (1‐2):120-144.
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  26. Paul L. Harris, Carl N. Johnson, Deborah Hutton, Giles Andrews & Tim Cooke (1989). Young Children's Theory of Mind and Emotion. Cognition and Emotion 3 (4):379-400.