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  1. Nicholas Agar, Dan W. Brock, Paul Lauritzen & Bernard G. Prusak (forthcoming). The Debate Over Liberal Eugenics. Hastings Center Report.
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  2. Paul Lauritzen (2013). Not Your Founder's Bioethics? Hastings Center Report 43 (4):43-45.
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  3. Paul Lauritzen (2011). Thinking Like a Mountain : Nature, Wilderness, and the Virtue of Humility. In Gregory E. Kaebnick (ed.), The Ideal of Nature: Debates About Biotechnology and the Environment. Johns Hopkins University Press. 114.
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  4. Paul Lauritzen (2010). Torture Warrants and Democratic States: Dirty Hands in an Age of Terror. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):93-112.
    In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, policy makers and others have debated the question of whether or not the United States should torture in an effort to prevent terrorist attacks. In a series of controversial essays, the legal theorist Alan Dershowitz argues that, if a democratic society is going to torture, it should at least be done under the cover of law. To that end, he recommends establishing a legal mechanism by which a judge could issue torture warrants—much as (...)
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  5. Sumner B. Twiss & Paul Lauritzen (2010). Focus on Ethics and Atrocity: An Introduction. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):1-3.
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  6. Paul Lauritzen (2008). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Visual Bioethics”. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):2-3.
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  7. Paul Lauritzen (2008). Visual Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):50 – 56.
    Although images are pervasive in public policy debates in bioethics, few who work in the field attend carefully to the way that images function rhetorically. If the use of images is discussed at all, it is usually to dismiss appeals to images as a form of manipulation. Yet it is possible to speak meaningfully of visual arguments. Examining the appeal to images of the embryo and fetus in debates about abortion and stem cell research, I suggest that bioethicists would be (...)
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  8. Paul Lauritzen (2006). Response to Richard B. Miller's "Children, Ethics, and Modern Medicine". [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (1):151 - 161.
    In this essay, Paul Lauritzen examines Richard B. Miller's liberal account of pediatric ethics by asking if the duty to promote a child's basic interests is substantial enough to secure the well-being of children. This question is raised in light of two case studies: daytime TV talk shows that broadcast interviews with sexually active children, and a medical study conducted to test the effect of growth hormone treatment on adult height in peripubertal children. In both cases, Lauritzen argues, children are (...)
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  9. Paul Lauritzen (2005). Stem Cells, Biotechnology, and Human Rights: Implications for a Posthuman Future. Hastings Center Report 35 (2):25-33.
    : Successful stem cell therapies might change the natural contours of human life. If that happened, it would unsettle our ethical commitments and encourage us to see the entire natural world merely as material to be manipulated.
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  10. Paul Lauritzen (2002). Richer Views of the Ethics of Reproduction. Hastings Center Report 32 (5):43-45.
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  11. Paul Lauritzen, Michael Mcclure, Martin L. Smith & Andrew Trew (2001). The Gift of Life and the Common Good: The Need for a Communal Approach to Organ Procurement. Hastings Center Report 31 (1):29-35.
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  12. Paul Lauritzen (1997). Hear No Evil, See No Evil, Think No Evil: Ethics and the Appeal to Experience. Hypatia 12 (2):83 - 104.
    This essay distinguishes three types of appeals to experience in ethics, identifies problems with appealing to experience, and argues that appeals to experience must be open to critical assessment, if experientially-based arguments are to be useful. Unless competing and potentially irreconcilable experiences can be assessed and adjudicated, experientially-based arguments will be problematic. The paper recommends thinking of the appeal to experience as a kind of storytelling to be evaluated as other stories are.
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  13. Paul Lauritzen (1996). Ethics and Experience: The Case of the Curious Response. Hastings Center Report 26 (1):6-15.
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  14. Paul Lauritzen (1996). Book Review:Surrogates and Other Mothers: The Debates Over Assisted Reproduction. Ruth Macklin. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (2):476-.
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  15. Paul Lauritzen & Mary Anne Warren (1995). Pursuing Parenthood: Ethical Issues in Assisted Reproduction. Bioethics-Oxford 9 (2):164-166.
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  16. Paul Lauritzen (1994). Review: The Self and Its Discontents: Recent Work on Morality and the Self. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 22 (1):187 - 210.
    Views of the self may be plotted on a set of coordinates. On the axis that runs from fragmentation to unity, Rorty and Rorty's Freud champion the decentered self while Wallwork, Taylor, and Ricoeur argue for a sovereign, unified self. On the other axis, which runs from the disengaged, inward-turning self to the engaged and "sedimented" self, Wallwork, would be positioned near Rorty, defending self-creation against the narrative identity affirmed by Taylor and Ricoeur. Despite his skepticism concerning the communitarian agenda (...)
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  17. Paul Lauritzen (1991). Errors of an Ill-Reasoning Reason: The Disparagement of Emotions in the Moral Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 25 (1):5-21.
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  18. Paul Lauritzen (1990). What Price Parenthood? Hastings Center Report 20 (2):38-46.
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  19. Paul Lauritzen (1989). A Feminist Ethic and the New Romanticism: Mothering as a Model of Moral Relations. Hypatia 4 (2):29 - 44.
    This paper claims that recent attempts to draw on the maternal experiences of women in order to articulate an ethic of care and compassion is a new romanticism. Like earlier romantic views, it is both attractive and potentially dangerous. The paper examines the basic claims of this new romanticism in order to identify both its strengths and weaknesses. I conclude that there are at least two versions of this new romanticism, one that relies primarily on the experiences of child-bearing in (...)
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  20. Paul Lauritzen (1988). Emotions and Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 16 (2):307 - 324.
    Given the dichotomy traditionally posited between reason and emotion, ethicists have generally downplayed or ignored the role of emotions in the moral life. In this paper I argue that the traditional dichotomy between reason and emotion should be abandoned, and that developing an account of emotions that attends to their cognitive structure can pave the way for a reassessment of the role emotions play in our efforts to live morally. I suggest that this reassessment is of particular interest to religious (...)
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  21. Paul Lauritzen (1987). Forgiveness: Moral Prerogative or Religious Duty? Journal of Religious Ethics 15 (2):141 - 154.
    Philosophers have sometimes drawn a distinction between supererogation and duty. This paper considers the possibility that a religious understanding of hu- man life and history may require what would otherwise be considered praise worthy but not obligatory. The specific example here is forgiveness. The paper sketches a view of forgiveness and suggests that forgiveness is not, at least in contemporary (secular) Western thought, considered to be a moral obligation. Several reasons why this might be the case are considered as well (...)
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  22. Paul Lauritzen (1984). Philosophy of Religion and the Mirror of Nature: Rorty's Challenge to Analytic Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16 (1):29 - 39.
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