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Profile: Paul Lodge (Oxford University)
  1. Paul Lodge, Page 720 I.
    It is well known that Leibniz believes that the motion of bodies is caused by an internal force.1 Moreover, he distinguishes between two kinds of force that are associated with bodies, which he calls primitive and derivative forces respectively. My aim is to explain Leibniz’s account of the relation between these two kinds of force, and to address a puzzle that arises in connection with this relation. In fact Leibniz speaks of two different kinds of derivative force. The first, and (...)
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  2. Paul Lodge, Zur Diskussion.
    According to one of Leibniz’s theories of contingency a proposition is contingent if and only if it cannot be proved in a finite number of steps. It has been argued that this faces the Problem of Lucky Proof, namely that we could begin by analysing the concept ‘Peter’ by saying that ‘Peter is a denier of Christ and …’, thereby having proved the proposition ‘Peter denies Christ’ in a finite number of steps. It also faces a more general but related (...)
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  3. Paul Lodge, American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, 76:4 (2002), Pp.575-600.
    contemporaries, Bayle and Locke. Unlike Bayle, but like Locke, Leibniz argues that reason and faith are in conformity. Nevertheless, in contrast to the account that he finds in Locke’s Essay, Leibniz does not reduce faith to a species of reasonable belief. Instead, he insists that, while faith must be grounded in reason, true or divine faith also requires a supernatural infusion of grace.
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  4. Paul Lodge, Leibniz Society Review 7 (1997), 116-24.
    Page 116 According to Robert Sleigh Jr., “The opening remarks of DM.18 make it clear that Leibniz took the results of DM.17 as either establishing, or at least going a long way toward establishing, that force is not identifiable with any mode characterizable terms of size, shape, and motion.”†2 Sleigh finds this puzzling and suggests that other commentators have generally been insufficiently perplexed by the bearing that the DM.17 has on the metaphysical issue. He notes that §17 of the Discourse (...)
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  5. Paul Lodge, (New Orleans).
    It is well known that Leibniz believes that the motion of bodies is caused by an internal force.1 Moreover, he distinguishes between two kinds of force that are associated with bodies, which he calls primitive and derivative forces respectively. My aim is to explain Leibniz’s account of the relation between these two kinds of force, and to address a puzzle that arises in connection with this relation.
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  6. Paul Lodge & T. W. C. Stoneham (eds.) (forthcoming). Locke and Leibniz on Substance and Identity. Routledge.
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  7. Paul Lodge & Tom Stoneham (eds.) (2014). Locke and Leibniz on Substance. Routledge.
    Locke and Leibniz on Substance gathers together papers by an international group of academic experts, examining the metaphysical concept of substance in the writings of these two towering philosophers of the early modern period. Each of these newly-commissioned essays considers important interpretative issues concerning the role that the notion of substance plays in the work of Locke and Leibniz, and its intersection with other key issues, such as personal identity. Contributors also consider the relationship between the two philosophers and contemporaries (...)
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  8. Paul Lodge (2012). Leibniz and the Two Sophies: The Philosophical Correspondence. The Leibniz Review 22:179-190.
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  9. Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra & Paul Lodge (2011). Infinite Analysis, Lucky Proof, and Guaranteed Proof in Leibniz. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 93 (2):222-236.
    According to one of Leibniz's theories of contingency a proposition is contingent if and only if it cannot be proved in a finite number of steps. It has been argued that this faces the Problem of Lucky Proof , namely that we could begin by analysing the concept ‘Peter’ by saying that ‘Peter is a denier of Christ and …’, thereby having proved the proposition ‘Peter denies Christ’ in a finite number of steps. It also faces a more general but (...)
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  10. Paul Lodge (2010). The Empirical Grounds for Leibniz's 'Real Metaphysics'. The Leibniz Review 20:13-36.
    In discussion of Leibniz’s philosophical methodology Donald Rutherford defends the view that Leibniz regarded metaphysics as an a priori demonstrative science. In the course of this discussion Rutherford isolates and tries to deflect a significant challenge for his view, namely the observation that in many of his mature writings on metaphysics Leibniz appears to defend his views by means of a posteriori arguments. I present some prima facie difficulties with Rutherford’s position and then offer an alternative account of how Leibniz (...)
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  11. Paul Lodge & Stephen Puryear (2006). Unconscious Conceiving and Leibniz's Argument for Primitive Concepts. Studia Leibnitiana 38 (2):177 - 196.
    In einem unlängst erschienenen Aufsatz untersucht Dennis Plaisted ein wichtiges Argument von Leibniz hinsichtlich der Existenz einfacher Begriffe. Plaisted stellt das Argument kurz dar, beurteilt es als offensichtlich unvereinbar mit anderen Positionen Leibniz' und schlägt eine Neugestaltung vor, die den Widerspruch auflösen soll. Die Revision erzeugt jedoch mehrere schwerwiegende Probleme und kann die aufgewiesene Inkonsistenz insofern nicht beheben - wir erörtern die Probleme und liefern eine, wie uns scheint, plausiblere Alternative. In diesem Zusammenhang machen wir auf Leibniz' wenig beachtete Auffassung (...)
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  12. Paul Lodge (2005). Garber's Interpretations of Leibniz on Corporeal Substance in the 'Middle Years'. The Leibniz Review 15:1-26.
    In 1985 Daniel Garber published his highly intluential paper “Leibniz and the Foundations of Physics: The Middle Years”. In two recent articles, Garber returns to these issues with a new position - that we should perhaps conclude that Leibniz did not have a view concerning the ultimate ontology of substance during his middle years. I discuss the viability of this position and consider some more general methodological issues that arise from this discussion.
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  13. Paul Lodge (ed.) (2004). Leibniz and His Correspondents. Cambridge, Uk ;Cambridge University Press.
    Unlike most of the other great philosophers, Leibniz never wrote a magnum opus, so his philosophical correspondence is essential for an understanding of his views. This collection of new essays by preeminent figures in the field of Leibniz scholarship is the most thorough account of Leibniz's philosophical correspondence available. It illuminates his philosophical views and pays due attention to the dialectical context in which the relevant passages from the letters occur.
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  14. Paul Lodge (2004). Leibniz's Close Encounter with Cartesianism in the Correspondence with De Volder. In , Leibniz and His Correspondents. Cambridge, Uk ;Cambridge University Press. 162--192.
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  15. Paul Lodge (2003). Leibniz on Relativity and the Motion of Bodies. Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):277--308.
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  16. Paul Lodge (2002). Leibniz, Bayle, and Locke on Faith and Reason. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):575-600.
    This paper illuminates Leibniz’s conception of faith and its relationship to reason. Given Leibniz’s commitment to natural religion, we might expect his view of faith to be deflationary. We show, however, that Leibniz’s conception of faith involves a significant non-rational element. We approach the issue by considering the way in which Leibniz positions himself between the views of two of his contemporaries, Bayle and Locke. Unlike Bayle, but like Locke, Leibniz argues that reason and faith are in conformity. Nevertheless, in (...)
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  17. Paul Lodge (2002). Leibniz on Divisibility, Aggregates, and Cartesian Bodies. Studia Leibnitiana 34 (1):59 - 80.
    Seine Kritik an Descartes' Auffassung vom Körper gründet Leibniz bekanntlich auf Erörterungen zur Teilbarkeit und Ausdehnung. Obgleich jene Argumentation im Fokus einer Auseinandersetzung mit Leibniz' Metaphysik angesiedelt werden muss, ist sie bisher nicht recht verstanden worden. Mein Anliegen hier ist im Kern, Leibniz' Gedankengang zu explizieren und dessen Stichhaltigkeit auszuleuchten. Das Argument, um das es geht, ist wohl am ehesten aus der Darlegung in Leibniz' Korrespondenz mit Antoine Arnauld bekannt, findet sich jedoch zudem im späteren Briefwechsel mit De Volder. Neben (...)
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  18. Paul Lodge & Ben Crowe (2002). Leibniz, Bayle, and Locke on Faith and Reason. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):575-600.
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  19. Paul Lodge (2001). Leibniz's Notion of an Aggregate. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (3):467 – 486.
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  20. Paul Lodge (2001). Past Masters Electronic Texts in Philosophy. The Leibniz Review 11:51-57.
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  21. Paul Lodge (2001). The Debate Over Extended Substance in Leibniz's Correspondence with de Volder. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (2):155 – 165.
    Between 1698 and 1706 Leibniz was engaged in one of his most interesting correspondences, with the Dutch philosopher and physicist Burcher de Volder. The two men were concerned primarily with the question of how the motion of bodies can be explained without appeal to the direct intervention of God. Leibniz presented a naturalistic account of motion to De Volder, but failed to convince him of its adequacy. I shall examine one reason for this failure - the disagreement that arose over (...)
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  22. Paul Lodge (1998). Leibniz's Commitment to the Pre-Established Harmony in the Late 1670s and Early 1680s. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 80 (3):292-320.
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  23. Paul Lodge (1998). Leibniz's Heterogeneity Argument Against the Cartesian Conception of Body. Studia Leibnitiana 30 (1):83-102.
     
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  24. Paul Lodge (1998). The Failure of Leibniz's Correspondence with De Volder. The Leibniz Review 8:47-67.
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  25. Paul Lodge & Marc Bobro (1998). Stepping Back Inside Leibniz's Mill. The Monist 81 (4):553-572.
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  26. Paul Lodge (1997). Force and the Nature of Body in Discourse on Metaphysics §§17-18. The Leibniz Review 7:116-124.
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  27. Paul Lodge (1996). Leibniz Microfilms at the University of Pennsylvania. The Leibniz Review 6:164-169.
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  28. Paul Lodge (1996). When Did Leibniz Adopt the Pre-Established Harmony? The Leibniz Review 6:170-171.
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