12 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Paul Livingston (University of New Mexico)
  1. Paul M. Livingston, Heidegger on Information Technology.
    My aim in this paper is to begin a discussion about how, and to what extent, Martin Heidegger’s thinking about technology offers helpful critical terms for thinking about the nature and global sway of today’s most dominant and prevalent forms of technology, namely the interrelated technologies of information, communication, and (capitalist) commerce. My suggestion will be that Heidegger’s thought does indeed have implications for critical thinking about these technologies, but that in order to see how it does, we may have (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Paul M. Livingston, Volume 2.
    Within contemporary analytic philosophy, at least, varieties of “naturalism” have attained a widespread dominance. In this essay I suggest, however, that a closer look at the history of the linguistic turn in philosophy can offer helpful terms for rethinking what we mean in applying the categories of “nature” and “culture” within a philosophical reflection on human life and practice. For, as I argue, the central experience of this history—namely, philosophy’s transformative encounter with what it envisions as the logical or conceptual (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Paul M. Livingston (2013). Plato's Account of Falsehood: A Study of the Sophist, by Paolo Crivelli. Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):431-438.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Paul M. Livingston (2011). The Politics of Logic: Badiou, Wittgenstein, and the Consequences of Formalism. Routledge.
    In this book, Livingston develops the political implications of formal results obtained over the course of the twentieth century in set theory, metalogic, and computational theory. He argues that the results achieved by thinkers such as Cantor, Russell, Gödel, Turing, and Cohen, even when they suggest inherent paradoxes and limitations to the structuring capacities of language or symbolic thought, have far-reaching implications for understanding the nature of political communities and their development and transformation. Alain Badiou's analysis of logical-mathematical structures forms (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Paul M. Livingston (2009). Agamben, Badiou, and Russell. Continental Philosophy Review 42 (3):297-325.
  6. Paul M. Livingston (2009). Review of Alain Badiou, Logics of Worlds: Being and Event Ii. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (10).
    If it is reasonable to hope that the current moment in philosophy may ultimately represent one of transition, from the divided remnants of the still enduring "split" between "analytic" and "continental" philosophy to some form (or forms) of twenty-first century philosophy that is no longer recognizably either (or is both), it seems likely as well that the thought and work of Alain Badiou can play a key role in articulating this much needed transition. One of the central innovations of Badiou's (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Paul M. Livingston (2008). Philosophy and the Vision of Language. Routledge.
    Early analytic philosophy -- Radical translation and intersubjective practice -- Critical outcome.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Paul M. Livingston (2005). Functionalism and Logical Analysis. In David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 19.
    After more than thirty-five years of debate and discussion, versions of the functionalist theory of mind originating in the work of Hilary Putnam, Jerry Fodor, and David Lewis still remain the most popular positions among philosophers of mind on the nature of mental states and processes. Functionalism has enjoyed such popularity owing, at least in part, to its claim to offer a plausible and compelling description of the nature of the mental that is also consistent with an underlying physicalist or (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Paul M. Livingston (2004). Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
    The problem of explaining consciousness today depends on the meaning of language: the ordinary language of consciousness in which we define and express our sensations, thoughts, dreams and memories. Paul Livingston argues that this contemporary problem arises from a quest that developed over the twentieth century, and that historical analysis provides new resources for understanding and resolving it. Accordingly, Livingston traces the application of characteristic practices of analytic philosophy to problems about the relationship of experience to linguistic meaning.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Paul M. Livingston (2002). Experience and Structure: Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness. Journal Of Consciousness Studies 9 (3):15-33.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Paul M. Livingston (2002). Husserl and Schlick on the Logical Form of Experience. Synthese 132 (3):239-272.
    Over a period of several decades spanning the origin of the Vienna Circle, Schlick repeatedly attacked Husserl''s phenomenological method for its reliance on the ability to intuitively grasp or see essences. Aside from its significance for phenomenologists, the attack illuminates significant and little-explored tensions in the history of analytic philosophy as well. For after coming under the influence of Wittgenstein, Schlick proposed to replace Husserl''s account of the epistemology of propositions describing the overall structure of experience with his own account (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Paul M. Livingston (2001). Russellian and Wittgensteinian Atomism. Philosophical Investigations 24 (1):30–54.
    The distinct logical atomisms of Russell and Wittgenstein represent the origin of much that is characteristic of analytic philosophy. They inaugurate the project of logical analysis of ordinary propositions, and provide the first general articulation in the analytic tradition of the connection between the logical form of meaning and the overall structure of the world. For both thinkers, this connection depends on the atomistic doctrine that there is a class of simple things from which everything else is composed, or upon (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation