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Paul Rusnock [27]Paul Herbert Rusnock [1]
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Profile: Paul Rusnock (University of Ottawa)
  1.  86
    Paul Rusnock & Mark Burke (2011). Etchemendy and Bolzano on Logical Consequence. History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (1):3-29.
    In a series of publications beginning in the 1980s, John Etchemendy has argued that the standard semantical account of logical consequence, due in its essentials to Alfred Tarski, is fundamentally mistaken. He argues that, while Tarski's definition requires us to classify the terms of a language as logical or non-logical, no such division is guaranteed to deliver the correct extension of our pre-theoretical or intuitive consequence relation. In addition, and perhaps more importantly, Tarski's account is claimed to be incapable of (...)
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  2.  7
    Paul Rusnock (ed.) (2000). Bolzano's Philosophy and the Emergence of Modern Mathematics. Rodopi.
    Contents: Acknowledgements. Conventions. Preface. Biographical sketch. 1 Introduction. 2 The Contributions. 3 Early work in analysis. 4 The Theory of Science . 5. Later mathematical studies. A On Kantian Intuitions. B The Bolzano-Cauchy Theorem.
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  3.  88
    Paul Rusnock (2011). Kant and Bolzano on Logical Form. Kant-Studien 102 (4):477-491.
    In the works of Kant and his followers, the notion of form plays an important role in explaining the apriority, necessity and certainty of logic. Bernard Bolzano (1781–1848), an important early critic of Kant, found the Kantians' definitions of form imprecise and their explanations of the special status of logic deeply unsatisfying. Proposing his own conception of form, Bolzano developed radically different views on logic, truth in virtue of form, and other matters. This essay presents Bolzano's views in the light (...)
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  4.  13
    Paul Rusnock & Rolf George (1995). A Last Shot at Kant and Incongruent Counterparts. Kant-Studien 86 (3):257-277.
  5.  17
    Paul Rusnock (2012). Remarks on Bolzano's Conception of Necessary Truth. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (4):1-21.
    This essay presents a new interpretation of Bolzano's account of necessary truth as set out in ?182 of the Theory of Science. According to this interpretation, Bolzano's conception is closely related to that of Leibniz, with some important differences. In the first place, Bolzano's conception of necessary truth embraces not only what Leibniz called metaphysical or brute necessities but also moral necessities (truths grounded in God's choice of the best among all metaphysical possibilities). Second, in marked contrast to Leibniz, Bolzano (...)
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  6.  15
    Stefan Roski & Paul Rusnock (2014). Bolzano on Necessary Existence. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 96 (3).
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  7.  20
    Paul Rusnock (2013). On Bolzano's Concept of a Sum. History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (2):155 - 169.
    Alongside his groundbreaking work in logic, Bernard Bolzano (1781?1848) made important contributions to ontology, notably with his theory of collections. Recent work has done much to elucidate Bolzano's conceptions, but his notion of a sum has proved stubbornly resistant to complete understanding. This paper offers a new interpretation of Bolzano's concept of a sum. I argue that, although Bolzano's presentation is defective, his conception is unexceptionable, and has important applications, notably in his work on the foundations of arithmetic.
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  8.  31
    Paul Thagard, Chris Eliasmith, Paul Rusnock & Cameron Shelley (2002). Epistemic Coherence. In R. Elio (ed.), Common sense, reasoning, and rationality. Vancouver Studies in Cognitive Science (Vol. 11). Oxford University Press 104-131.
    Many contemporary philosophers favor coherence theories of knowledge (Bender 1989, BonJour 1985, Davidson 1986, Harman 1986, Lehrer 1990). But the nature of coherence is usually left vague, with no method provided for determining whether a belief should be accepted or rejected on the basis of its coherence or incoherence with other beliefs. Haack's (1993) explication of coherence relies largely on an analogy between epistemic justification and crossword puzzles. We show in this paper how epistemic coherence can be understood in terms (...)
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  9.  5
    Rolf George & Paul Rusnock (1994). Snails Rolled Up Contrary to All Sense. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):459-466.
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  10.  24
    Paul Rusnock (2004). Was Kants Philosophy of Mathematics Right for His Time? Kant-Studien 95 (4):426-442.
  11.  1
    Rolf George & Paul Rusnock (1994). Review: Review Essays: Snails Rolled Up Contrary to All Sense. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):459 - 466.
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  12.  6
    Paul Rusnock & Rolf George (2004). Bolzano as Logician. In Dov M. Gabbay, John Woods & Akihiro Kanamori (eds.), Handbook of the History of Logic. Elsevier 3--177.
  13.  8
    Paul Rusnock (2013). Kant and Bolzano on Analyticity. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 95 (3):298-335.
  14.  9
    Paul Rusnock (1997). Bolzano and the Traditions of Analysis. Grazer Philosophische Studien 53:61-85.
    Russell, in his History of Western Philosophy, wrote that modern analytical philosophy had its origins in the construction of modern functional analysis by Weierstrass and others. As it turns out, Bolzano, in the first four decades of the nineteenth century, had already made important contributions'to the creation of "Weierstrassian" analysis, some of which were well known to Weierstrass and his circle. In addition, his mathematical research was guided by a methodology which articulated many of the central principles of modern philosophical (...)
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  15.  8
    Jan Sebestik & Paul Rusnock (2013). The Beyträge at 200: Bolzano's Quiet Revolution in the Philosophy of Mathematics. Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 1 (8).
    This paper surveys Bolzano's Beyträge zu einer begründeteren Darstellung der Mathematik (Contributions to a better-grounded presentation of mathematics) on the 200th anniversary of its publication. The first and only published issue presents a definition of mathematics, a classification of its subdisciplines, and an essay on mathematical method, or logic. Though underdeveloped in some areas (including,somewhat surprisingly, in logic), it is nonetheless a radically innovative work, where Bolzano presents a remarkably modern account of axiomatics and the epistemology of the formal sciences. (...)
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  16.  2
    Paul Rusnock (2003). Qu'est-ce que la représentation ? Bolzano et la philosophie autrichienne. Philosophiques 30 (1):67-81.
    Largely ignored in Germany during the nineteenth century, Bolzano was certainly better known in Austria, in particular among Brentano’s students, who enthusiastically studied his Theory of science. In this respect it makes sense to speak of Bolzano as belonging to a tradition of Austrian philosophy. Yet an examination of the reception of Bolzano’s ideas among Brentano’s students indicates that he was not always well understood. This article discusses a particular case, Twardowski’s reaction to Bolzano’s theory of representation.
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  17.  11
    Rolf George & Paul Rusnock (1996). Review: Review Essays: The Semantic Tradition From Kant to Carnap: To the Vienna Station. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (2):461 - 468.
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  18.  11
    Paul Rusnock (2007). Review of A. Behboud, Bolzanos Beiträge Zur Mathematik Und Ihrer Philosophie [Bolzano's Contributions to Mathematics and its Philosophy]. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 15 (2):238-244.
    Bernard Bolzano of Prague was one of the few thinkers of his time who combined real talent in mathematics and philosophy. He was especially drawn to the common ground between these fields, interested in questions of method and what would today be called foundations . Interestingly, he was neither a professional mathematician nor a professional philosopher. As a young man, he had decided that his first priority must be to work for the reform and improvement of society. This led him, (...)
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  19.  6
    Rolf George & Paul Rusnock (1996). The Semantic Tradition From Kant to Carnap. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (2):461-468.
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  20.  2
    Paul Rusnock (1999). Philosophy of Mathematics: Bolzano's Responses to Kant and Lagrange/La Philosophie des Mathématiques: Les Réponses de Bolzano À Kant Et Lagrange. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 52 (3):399-428.
  21.  2
    Rolf George & Paul Rusnock (2006). Bolzano's Political Philosophy. In Markus Textor (ed.), The Austrian Contribution to Analytic Philosophy. Routledge 1--264.
  22.  1
    Paul Rusnock (2002). Paul Thagard, Chris Eliasmith, Paul Rusnock, & Cameron Shelley. In Renée Elio (ed.), Common Sense, Reasoning, & Rationality. Oxford University Press 104.
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  23.  2
    Paul Rusnock (1996). Review of J. Sebestik, Logique Et Mathdmatique Chez Bernard Bolzano. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 4 (1).
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  24. Rolf George & Paul Rusnock (eds.) (2014). Theory of Science. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This edition provides the first complete English translation of Bernard Bolzano's four-volume Wissenschaftslehre or Theory of Science, a masterwork of theoretical philosophy. First published in 1837, the Wissenschaftslehre is a monumental, wholly original study in logic, epistemology, heuristics, and scientific methodology. Unlike most logical studies of the period, it is not concerned with the "psychological self-consciousness of the thinking mind." Instead, it develops logic as the science of "propositions in themselves" and their parts, especially the relations between these entities. It (...)
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  25. Paul Rusnock (2013). . Philosophical Explorations 95 (3):298-335.
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  26. Paul Rusnock & Rolf George (eds.) (2014). Bernard Bolzano: Theory of Science. OUP Oxford.
    This is the first full English translation of Bernard Bolzano's masterwork, the Theory of Science (1837)--a monumental and revolutionary study in logic, epistemology, heuristics, and scientific methodology. Each volume includes an introduction which illuminates the historical context of Bolzano's work and its continuing relevance.
     
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