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Paul Russell [71]Paul N. Russell [4]Paul S. Russell [1]
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Profile: Paul Russell (University of British Columbia)
Profile: Paul Russell (University of British Columbia)
  1.  25
    Paul Russell (2008). The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion. Oxford University Press.
    Although it is widely recognized that David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40) belongs among the greatest works of philosophy, there is little agreement about the correct way to interpret his fundamental intentions. It is an established orthodoxy among almost all commentators that skepticism and naturalism are the two dominant themes in this work. The difficulty has been, however, that Hume's skeptical arguments and commitments appear to undermine and discredit his naturalistic ambition to contribute to "the science of man". (...)
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  2.  44
    Paul Russell (1995). Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Russell examines Hume's notion of free will and moral responsibility. It is widely held that Hume presents us with a classic statement of a compatibilist position--that freedom and responsibility can be reconciled with causation and, indeed, actually require it. Russell argues that this is a distortion of Hume's view, because it overlooks the crucial role of moral sentiment in Hume's picture of human nature. Hume was concerned to describe the regular mechanisms which generate moral sentiments such as (...)
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  3. Paul Russell (1992). Strawson's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility. Ethics 102 (2):287-302.
    Where Nature thus determines us, we have an original non-rational commitment which sets the bounds within which, or the stage upon which, reason can effectively operate.
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  4.  35
    Paul Russell & Oisin Deery (eds.) (2013). The Philosophy of Free Will: Essential Readings From the Contemporary Debates. Oxford University Press.
    This collection provides a selection of the most essential contributions to the contemporary free will debate. Among the issues discussed and debated are skepticism and naturalism, alternate possibilities, the consequence argument, libertarian metaphysics, illusionism and revisionism, optimism and pessimism, neuroscience and free will, and experimental philosophy.
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  5. Paul Russell (1985). Hume's `Reconciling Project': A Reply to Flew. Mind 94 (376):587-590.
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  6.  11
    William S. Helton, Martin J. Dorahy & Paul N. Russell (2011). Dissociative Tendencies and Right-Hemisphere Processing Load: Effects on Vigilance Performance. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):696-702.
    The present study was designed to explore the relationship between self-reported dissociative experiences and performance in tasks eliciting right-hemisphere processing load. Thirty-four participants performed a vigilance task in two conditions: with task-irrelevant negative-arousing pictures and task-irrelevant neutral pictures. Dissociation was assessed with the Dissociative Experience Scale. Consistent with theories positing right-hemisphere deregulation in high non-clinical dissociators, dissociative experiences correlated with greater vigilance decrement only in the negative picture condition. As both the vigilance task and negative picture processing are right lateralized, (...)
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  7.  40
    Paul Russell (2004). Responsibility and the Condition of Moral Sense. Philosophical Topics 32 (1-2):287-305.
    Recent work in contemporary compatibilist theory displays considerable sophistication and subtlety when compared with the earlier theories of classical compatibilism. Two distinct lines of thought have proved especially influential and illuminating. The first developed around the general hypothesis that moral sentiments or reactive attitudes are fundamental for understanding the nature and conditions of moral responsibility. The other important development is found in recent compatibilist accounts of rational self-control or reason responsiveness. Strictly speaking, these two lines of thought have developed independent (...)
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  8. Paul Russell (2000). Compatibilist Fatalism. In A. van den Beld (ed.), Moral Responsibility and Ontology. Kluwer 199--218.
    Compatibilists argue, famously, that it is a simple incompatibilist confusion to suppose that determinism implies fatalism. Incompatibilists argue, on the contrary, that determinism implies fatalism, and thus cannot be consistent with the necessary conditions of moral responsibility. Despite their differences, however, both parties are agreed on one important matter: the refutation of fatalism is essential to the success of the compatibilist strategy. In this paper I argue that compatibilism requires a richer conception of fatalistic concern; one that recognizes the _legitimacy_ (...)
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  9. Paul Russell, Hume on Free Will. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    David Hume is widely recognized as providing the most influential statement of the “compatibilist” position in the free will debate — the view that freedom and moral responsibility can be reconciled with (causal) determinism. The arguments that Hume advances on this subject are found primarily in the sections titled “Of liberty and necessity”, as first presented in A Treatise of Human Nature (2.3.1-2) and, later, in a slightly amended form, in the Enquiry concerning Human Understanding (sec. 8). Although there is (...)
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  10.  97
    Paul Russell (1984). Sorabji and the Dilemma of Determinism. Analysis 44 (4):166 - 172.
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  11. Paul Russell (2002). Pessimists, Pollyannas, and the New Compatibilism. In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford University Press
    If a man is a pessimist, he is born a pessimist, and emotionally you cannot make him an optimist. And if he is an optimist, you can tell him nothing to make him a pessimist. - Clarence Darrow.
     
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  12.  26
    Paul Russell (1995). Hume's Treatise and the Clarke-Collins Controversy. Hume Studies 21 (1):95-115.
  13.  46
    Paul Russell (2008). Free Will, Art and Morality. Journal of Ethics 12 (3/4):307 - 325.
    The discussion in this paper begins with some observations regarding a number of structural similarities between art and morality as it involves human agency. On the basis of these observations we may ask whether or not incompatibilist worries about free will are relevant to both art and morality. One approach is to claim that libertarian free will is essential to our evaluations of merit and desert in both spheres. An alternative approach, is to claim that free will is required only (...)
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  14.  20
    Paul Russell (2004). Butler's "Future State" and Hume's "Guide of Life". Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (4):425-448.
    : In this paper I argue that Hume's famous discussion of probability and induction, as originally presented in the Treatise, is significantly motivated by irreligious objectives. A particular target of Hume's arguments is Joseph Butler's Analogy of Religion. In the Analogy Butler intends to persuade his readers of both the credibility and practical importance of the doctrine of a future state of rewards and punishments. The argument that he advances relies on probable reasoning and proceeds on the assumption that our (...)
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  15.  4
    Paul Russell (2010). Butler’s “Future State” & Hume’s “Guide of Life”. Hybris 10 (4):425-448.
    In this paper I argue that Hume's famous discussion of probability and induction, as originally presented in the Treatise, is significantly motivated by irreligious objectives. A particular target of Hume's arguments is Joseph Butler's Analogy of Religion. In the Analogy Butler intends to persuade his readers of both the credibility and practical importance of the doctrine of a future state of rewards and punishments. The argument that he advances relies on probable reasoning and proceeds on the assumption that our past (...)
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  16.  12
    Paul Russell (1990). A Hobbist Tory. Hume Studies 16 (1):75-79.
  17. Paul Russell (forthcoming). Hobbes, Bramhall, and the Free Will Problem. In Desmonde Clarke Catherine Wilson (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Early modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press
    Thomas Hobbes changed the face of moral philosophy in ways that still structure and resonate within the contemporary debate. It was Hobbes’s central aim, particularly as expressed in the Leviathan, to make moral philosophy genuinely ‘scientific’, where this term is understood as science had developed and evolved in the first half of the seventeenth century. Specifically, it was Hobbes’s aim to provide a thoroughly naturalistic description of human beings in terms of the basic categories and laws of matter and motion. (...)
     
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  18.  85
    Paul Russell (1986). Locke on Express and Tacit Consent: Misinterpretations and Inconsistencies. Political Theory 14 (2):291-306.
  19.  37
    Paul Russell (1987). Nozick, Need and Charity. Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (2):205-216.
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  20.  27
    Paul Russell (1997). Wishart, Baxter & Hume's Letter From a Gentleman. Hume Studies 23 (2):245-276.
    "However that all objections may be taken off with more advantage and clearness, I beg leave to lay down the following principle... It is impossible the effect should be perfecter than its cause... [D]enying this principle leads to downright Atheism...".
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  21. Paul Russell (1995). Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility. Oxford University Press Usa.
    In this book, Russell examines Hume's notion of free will and moral responsibility. It is widely held that Hume presents us with a classic statement of the "compatibilist" position--that freedom and responsibility can be reconciled with causation and, indeed, actually require it. Russell argues that this is a distortion of Hume's view, because it overlooks the crucial role of moral sentiment in Hume's picture of human nature. Hume was concerned to describe the regular mechanisms which generate moral sentiments such as (...)
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  22. Paul Russell, Free Will and Reactive Attitudes: Perspectives on P.F. Strawson's Freedom and Resentment.
    We are naturally social beings; and given with our natural commitment to social existence is a natural commitment to that whole web or structure of human personal and moral attitudes and feelings, and judgments of which I spoke. Our natural disposition to such attitudes and judgments is naturally secured against arguments suggesting they are in principle unwarranted or unjustified ….
     
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  23. Paul Russell (2002). Responsibility and Control. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32:587-606.
    According to the central tenets of classical compatibilism, the only kind of control required for agents to be free and responsible is the ability to act according to the determination of their own desires and willings. Since this condition can be satisfied without denying the thesis of determinism, it is argued, we can dismiss the pessimistic worries of the incompatibilist as unfounded.1 While this view of things dominated compatibilism for many generations, by the end of the twentieth century it was (...)
     
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  24. Paul Russell (2006). Practical Reason and Motivational Scepticism. In Heiner F. Klemme Dieter Schönecker & Manfred Kuehn (eds.), “Practical Reason and Motivational Scepticism”, in Heiner F. Klemme, Manfred Kuehn, Dieter Schönecker, eds., Moralische Motivation. Kant und die Alternativen. Kant-Forschungen. Felix Meiner Verlag
    In her influential and challenging paper “Skepticism about Practical Reason” Christine Korsgaard sets out to refute an important strand of Humean scepticism as it concerns a Kantian understanding of practical reason.1 Korsgaard distinguishes two components of scepticism about practical reason. The first, which she refers to as content scepticism, argues that reason cannot of itself provide any “substantive guidance to choice and action” (SPR, 311). In its classical formulation, as stated by Hume, it is argued that reason cannot determine our (...)
     
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  25.  16
    Paul Russell (2010). Wishart, Baxter and Hume's Letter From a Gentleman. Hume Studies 23 (2):245-276.
  26.  8
    Paul Russell (2010). Butler. Hybris 10.
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  27.  6
    Paul Russell (2008). Hume's Lucretian Mission. The Monist 90 (2):182-199.
  28.  37
    Paul Russell (2007). Hume's Lucretian Mission: Is It Self-Refuting? The Monist 90 (2):182-199.
    Hume’s famous and influential contributions to the philosophy of religion pursue two broad themes that have deep links with his general sceptical and naturalistic commitments throughout his philosophy as a whole.1 The first is his sceptical critique of the philosophical arguments and doctrines of various (Christian) theological systems. The second is his naturalistic account of the origins and roots of religion in human nature. Taken together, these two themes serve to advance Hume’s “Lucretian mission”, which was to discredit and dislodge (...)
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  29.  2
    Paul Russell (1985). Hume's Treatise and Hobbes's the Elements of Law. Journal of the History of Ideas 46 (1):51.
  30.  2
    Paul Russell (2002). Critical Notice. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):587-606.
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  31.  43
    Paul Russell (1999). Smith on Moral Sentiment and Moral Luck. History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (1):37 - 58.
    Such is the effect of the good or bad consequences of actions upon the sentiments both of the person who performs them, and of others; and thus, Fortune, which governs the world, has some influence where we should be least willing to allow her any, and directs in some measure the sentiments of mankind, with regard to the character and conduct both of themselves and others.
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  32.  26
    Paul Russell (1990). Hume on Responsibility and Punishment. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):539 - 563.
  33.  10
    Paul Russell (1984). Hume's Two Definitions of 'Cause' and the Ontology of Double Existence. Hume Studies 10 (1):1-25.
  34. Paul Russell (2006). Moral Sense and Virtue in Hume's Ethics. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press
    “This constant habit of surveying ourselves, as it were, in reflection, keeps alive all the sentiments of right and wrong, and begets, in noble natures, a certain reverence for themselves as well as others, which is the surest guardian of every virtue.”.
     
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  35.  10
    Paul Russell (1988). 'Atheism' and the Title-Page of Hume's Treatise. Hume Studies 14 (2):408-423.
  36.  4
    Paul Russell (1988). Skepticism and Natural Religion in Hume's "Treatise". Journal of the History of Ideas 49 (2):247.
  37.  8
    Paul Russell (1993). A Progress Of Sentiments. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):107-123.
  38.  31
    Paul Russell (1989). Hobbes and the Social Contract Tradition. Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (4):620-622.
  39.  16
    Paul Russell (1984). Hume's "Two Definitions" of Cause and the Ontology of "Double Existence". Hume Studies 10 (1):1-25.
  40. Paul Russell, Free Will and Irreligion in Hume's Treatise.
    Hume’s views on free will have been enormously influential and are widely regarded as representing “the best-known classical statement of what is now known as compatibilism”.1 There are a number of valuable studies that consider his contribution on this subject from a contemporary, critical perspective, but this will not be my particular concern in this paper.2 My primary interest, consistent with the specific aims and objectives of this volume, is to explain the way that Hume’s arguments in T, 2.3.1-2 relate (...)
     
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  41. Paul Russell (web). Selective Hard Compatibilism. In J. Campbell, M. O'Rourke & H. Silverstein (eds.), Action, Ethics and Responsibility: Topics in Contemporary Philosophy, Vol. 7. MIT Press
    in Joseph Campbell, Michael O’Rourke and Harry Silverstein, eds., Action, Ethics and Responsibility: Topics in Contemporary Philosophy, Vol. 7 (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, forthcoming.
     
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  42.  7
    Paul Russell (1995). Faith, Scepticism & Personal Identity: A Festschrift for Terence Penelhum (Review). Hume Studies 21 (2):351-354.
  43.  12
    Paul Russell (2002). Critical Notice of John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza, Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):587-606.
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  44.  25
    Paul Russell (1988). Causation, Compulsion, and Compatibilism. American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (October):313-321.
  45.  24
    Paul Russell, Hume on Religion. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    There are many questions in philosophy to which no satisfactory answer has yet been given. But the question of the nature of the gods is the darkest and most difficult of all…. So various and so contradictory are the opinions of the most learned men on this matter as to persuade one of the truth of the saying that philosophy is the child of ignorance… — Cicero, The Nature of the Gods..
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  46.  21
    Paul Russell (2005). “L’Irreligione E Lo Spettatore Imparziale Nel Sistema Morale di Adam Smith” [Irreligion and the Impartial Spectator in Smith’s Moral System]. Rivista di Filosofia 3 (3):375-403.
    When we thus despair of finding any force upon earth which can check the triumph of injustice, we naturally appeal to heaven, and hope, that the great Author of our nature will himself execute hereafter, what all the principles which he has given us for the direction of our conduct, prompt us to attempt even here … And thus we are led to the belief of a future state, not only by the weaknesses, by the hopes and fears of human (...)
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  47.  3
    Paul Russell (1990). A Hobbist Tory: Johnson on Hume. Hume Studies 16 (1):75-79.
  48.  2
    Paul N. Russell, Deirdre Barker & Nirbhay N. Singh (1987). The Effects of Kava on Alerting and Speed of Access of Information From Long-Term Memory. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (4):236-237.
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  49.  8
    Paul Russell (1984). Corrections Regarding "Hume's 'Two Definitions' of Cause and the Ontology of 'Double Existence'". Hume Studies 10 (2):165-166.
  50.  3
    William S. Helton & Paul N. Russell (2015). Rest is Best: The Role of Rest and Task Interruptions on Vigilance. Cognition 134:165-173.
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