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  1. Paul S. MacDonald (2013). Palaeo-Philosophy: Archaic Ideas About Space and Time. Comparative Philosophy 4 (2).
    This paper argues that efforts to understand historically remote patterns of thought are driven away from their original meaning if the investigation focuses on reconstruction of concepts , instead of cognitive ‘complexes’. My paper draws on research by Jan Assmann, Jean-Jacques Glassner, Keimpe Algra, Alex Purves, Nicholas Wyatt, and others on the cultures of Ancient Greece, Israel, Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Etruria through comparative analyses of the semantic fields of spatial and temporal terms, and how these terms are shaped by their (...)
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  2. Paul S. MacDonald (2006). Palaeo-Philosophy: Complex and Concept in Archaic Patterns of Thought. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 1 (2):222-244.
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  3. Paul S. MacDonald (2002). Descartes: The Lost Episodes. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (4):437-460.
    This article is concerned with three exceptional episodes in Descartes's life, each of which had a profound impact on the development of his thought; several arguments are advanced and new primary material uncovered to support our contentions. First, he did indeed visit Prague in November 1620 and his experiences there shaped his later views of mechanical automata, optical illusions, and the pseudosciences. Second, his encounter with the mysterious Sieur de Chandoux (identified here for the first time) in November 1628 shows (...)
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  4. Paul S. MacDonald (2001). Current Approaches to Phenomenology. Inquiry 44 (1):101-124.
  5. Paul S. MacDonald (2001). Husserl's Preemptive Responses to Existentialist Critiques. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 1 (1).
    Existentialist thinkers often publicly acknowledged Husserl’s phenomenology as one of their main points of departure for treatment of such themes as intentionality, comportment, transcendence, and the lifeworld. Several central elements of Husserl’s approach were adopted by the Existentialists, but equal to their gratitude were vigorous declamations of Husserl’s mistakes, dead-ends and failures. Many of the Existentialists’ criticisms of Husserl’s project are well-known and have been rehearsed in various surveys of 20th century thought, but less well-remarked are the discrepancies between their (...)
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  6. Paul S. MacDonald (ed.) (2001). The Existentialist Reader: An Anthology of Key Texts. Routledge.
    The Existentialist Reader is a comprehensive anthology of classic philosophical writings from eight key existentialist thinkers: Sartre, Camus, Heidegger, de Beauvoir, Jaspers, Marcel, Merleau-Ponty, and Ortega y Gasset. These substantial and carefully selected readings consider the distinctive concerns of existentialism: absurdity, anxiety, alienation, death. A comprehensive introduction by Paul S. MacDonald illuminates the existentialist quest for individual freedom and authentic human experience with insight into the historical and intellectual background of these major figures. The Existentialist Reader is a valuable guide (...)
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  7. Paul S. Macdonald (2000). Phenomenological Factors in Vygotsky's Mature Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 13 (3):69-93.
    This article examines some of the phenomenological features in Lev Vygotsky’s mature psychological theory, especially in Thinking and Speech and The Current Crisis in Psychology. It traces the complex literary and philosophical influences in 1920s Moscow on Vygotsky’s thought, through Gustav Shpet’s seminars on Husserl and the inner form of the word, Chelpanov’s seminars on phenomenology, Bakhtin’s theory of the production of inner speech, and the theoretical insights of the early Gestalt psychologists. It begins with an exposition of two central (...)
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  8. Paul S. MacDonald (1999). Descartes and Husserl: The Philosophical Project of Radical Beginnings. State University of New York Press.
    Presents the first book-length study of the profound influence of Descartes' philosophy on Husserl's project for phenomenology.
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  9. Paul S. MacDonald (1999). Within Reason: A Life of Spinoza by Margaret Gullan-Whur. London: Jonathan Cape, 1998, XVIII + 398 Pp. £20 (Hc). [REVIEW] Philosophy 74 (4):606-618.
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  10. Paul S. MacDonald (1997). E-Collection. Philosophy and Theology 10 (2).
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  11. Paul S. MacDonald (1997). Philosophical Conversion. Philosophy and Theology 10 (2):303-327.
    Although the concept of conversion is usually encountered in religious contexts, the main contention of this paper is that there is a genuine significance in the concept of philosophical conversion. The scene is set by considering the New Testament meaning of epistrepho, “to turn away from,” and the Platonic use of the term in the Republic. The underlying concept here is that one must lose the old world in order to gain it anew. Through the process of conversion, both the (...)
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  12. Paul S. MacDonald (1997). The Absurdity of the Paranormal. Cogito 11 (1):33-38.
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