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  1. Paul Schollmeier, Happiness and Luckiness.
    Moral philosophers, beginning with Bernard Williams and Thomas Nagel, have recently broached the topic of moral luck in the philosophical literature. They limit their discussion however to considerations of how luck affects our ability to carry out actions or how it affects the consequences of our actions. I wish to suggest that luck is also an important factor in determining our actions as ends in themselves. What actions we may choose to perform for their own sake in a given situation (...)
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  2. Paul Schollmeier (forthcoming). Purgation of Pitiableness and Fearfulness. Hermes.
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  3. Paul Schollmeier (2008). What is a Public? Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:721-728.
    The American philosopher John Dewey defines a public as those who are affected by indirect consequences of transactions to such an extent that they deem it necessary to care systematically for these consequences. Unfortunately, his definition enables a public to cooperate merely for the control of the negative consequences of human action. Plato suggests that we might better define a public as those who deem it desirable to care for human action for the sake of itself as well as for (...)
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  4. Paul Schollmeier (2004). Toward a Rhetoric of Anthropology. Social Epistemology 18 (1):59 – 69.
    What I wish to do in this essay is to explain how ancient rhetoric and modern anthropology share a common methodology. I shall argue that a theory of rhetoric developed by Aristotle can provide paradigms to account for new approaches to anthropology developed fairly recently. Among rhetorical arguments Aristotle distinguishes enthymene and example, and he recognizes historical, mythological, and philosophical examples. But contemporary anthropologists distinguish historical, mythological, and philosophical arguments in anthropology. Aristotle's division of example can thus provide a unifying (...)
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  5. Paul Schollmeier (2002). Pragmatic Method and Its Rhetorical Lineage. Philosophy and Rhetoric 35 (4):368-381.
    Paul Schollmeier 1. “A new name for some old ways of thinking,” William James subtitled his most popular book. With typical diffidence, he did not hesitate to acknowledge that many earlier philosophers were cognizant of and practiced in the pragmatic method. He mentions by name not only Locke, Berkeley, and Hume but also Socrates, “who was adept at it,” and Aristotle, “who used it methodically” (1916, 50). Nor was he alone in his acknowledgement of his predecessors. Charles Sanders Peirce, who (...)
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  6. Paul Schollmeier (1999). Aristotle, Virtue and the Mean Richard Bosley, Roger A. Shiner, and Janet D. Sisson, Editors Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science, 25, 4 (December 1995) Edmonton: Academic Printing and Publishing, 1996, Xxi + 217 Pp., $59.95, $21.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (03):610-.
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  7. Paul Schollmeier (1999). Aristotle, Virtue and the Mean. Dialogue 38 (3):610-613.
     
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  8. Paul Schollmeier (1998). Aristotle and Aristotelians. Social Theory and Practice 24 (1):133-151.
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  9. Paul Schollmeier (1998). Ancient tragedy and other selves. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 2:175-188.
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  10. A. W. H. Adkins, Robert B. Louden & Paul Schollmeier (eds.) (1996). The Greeks and Us: Essays in Honor of Arthur W.H. Adkins. University of Chicago Press.
    Arthur W. H. Adkins's writings have sparked debates among a wide range of scholars over the nature of ancient Greek ethics and its relevance to modern times. Demonstrating the breadth of his influence, the essays in this volume reveal how leading classicists, philosophers, legal theorists, and scholars of religion have incorporated Adkins's thought into their own diverse research. The timely subjects addressed by the contributors include the relation between literature and moral understanding, moral and nonmoral values, and the contemporary meaning (...)
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  11. Paul Schollmeier (1994). Other Selves: Aristotle on Personal and Political Friendship. State University of New York Press.
    This book presents a thorough and systematic integration of Aristotle's analysis of friendship with the main lines of the rest of his work in Politics and Nicomachean Ethics.
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  12. Paul Schollmeier (1993). Simian Virtue. Between the Species 10 (1):6.
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  13. Paul Schollmeier (1992). Equine Virtue. Between the Species 8 (1):10.
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  14. Paul Schollmeier (1991). Practical Intuition and Rhetorical Example. Philosophy and Rhetoric 24 (2):95 - 104.
    Let us assume with the classical philosophers that we have a faculty of theoretical intuition, through which we intuit theoretical principles, and a faculty of practical intuition, through which we intuit practical principles. This modest assumption would allow us to distinguish conceptual intuitions from perceptual intuitions. l wish to ask how we could then know if our intuitions of practical principles are true or not. Could we justify or verify our theoretical and practical intuitions in the same way? One would (...)
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