8 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Paul Symington (Franciscan University of Steubenville)
  1. Paul Symington (2012). Rockmore, Tom. Kant and Phenomenology. The Review of Metaphysics 66 (2):380-382.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Marilynne Robinson, Dennis Sobolev, Paul Symington, Jorge Je Gracia, Jonathan Lowe, Peter Simons, Erwin Tegtmeier Frankfurt, Keith Ward, Grand Rapids & John F. Wippel (2011). American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 522. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Paul Symington (2011). Metaphysics Renewed. International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (3):285-301.
    This article considers the significance of Kant’s schematized categories in the Critique of Pure Reason for contemporary metaphysics. I present Kant’s understanding of the schematism and how it functions within his critique of the limits of pure reason. Then I argue that, although the true role of the schemata is a relatively late development in Kant’s thought, it is nevertheless a core notion, and the central task of the first Critique can be sufficiently articulated in the language of the schematism. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Paul Symington (2011). Thomas Aquinas, Perceptual Resemblance, Categories, and the Reality of Secondary Qualities. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 85:237-252.
    Arguably one of the most fundamental phase shifts that occurred in the intellectual history of Western culture involved the ontological reduction of secondary qualities to primary qualities. To say the least, this reduction worked to undermine the foundations undergirding Aristotelian thought in support of a scientific view of the world based strictly on an examination of the real—primary— qualities of things. In this essay, I identify the so-called “Causal Argument” for a reductive view of secondary qualities and seek to deflect (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Paul Symington (2010). The Aristotelian Epistemic Principle and the Problem of Divine Naming in Aquinas. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:133-144.
    In this paper, I engage in a preliminary discussion to the thorny problem of analogous naming in Aquinas; namely, the Maimonidean problem of how ourconceptual content can relate to us any knowledge of God. I identify this problem as the First Semantic/Epistemic Problem (FSEP) of religious language. Theprimary determination of semantic content for Aquinas is what I call the Aristotelian Epistemic Principle (AEP). This principle holds that a belief is related tosome experience in order to be known. I show how (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Paul Symington (2007). The Nature of Naming and the Analogy of Being: McInerny and the Denial of a Proper Analogy of Being. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):91-102.
    This paper addresses the question of whether there is a proper analogy of being according to both meaning and being. I disagree with Ralph McInerny’s understanding of how things are named through concepts and argue that McInerny’s account does not allow for the thing represented by the name to be known in itself. In his understanding of analogy, only ideas of things may be known. This results in a wholesale inability to name things at all and thereby forces McInerny to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Paul Symington (2006). Beyond Continents. Philosophy Today 50 (3):263-271.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Paul Symington (2006). The Unconscious and Conscious Self: The Nature of Psychical Unity in Freud and Lonergan. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (4):563-580.
    This article compares the accounts of psychical unity in Freud and Lonergan. Following a detailed account of Freud’s understanding of psychical structure andhis deterministic psycho-biological presuppositions, Lonergan’s understanding of psychical structure in relation to patterns of experience is discussed. As opposed to Freud’s theory, which is based on an imaginative synthesis of the classical laws of natural science, Lonergan considers psychical and organic function as concretely integrated in human functionality according to probabilistic schemes of recurrence. Consequently, Lonergan offers a theory (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation