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  1. Paul T. Menzel (forthcoming). Determining The. Free Inquiry.
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  2. Paul T. Menzel (forthcoming). Justice and Fairness: Mandating Universal Participation. Hastings Center Report.
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  3. Paul T. Menzel (2014). Against Fairness. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (1):95-97.
    The book, Against Fairness, by philosopher Stephen T. Asma is reviewed. Concepts of favoritism and justice are explored.
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  4. Paul T. Menzel & Bonnie Steinbock (2013). Advance Directives, Dementia, and Physician‐Assisted Death. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):484-500.
    Physician-assisted suicide laws in Oregon and Washington require the person's current competency and a prognosis of terminal illness. In The Netherlands voluntariness and unbearable suffering are required for euthanasia. Many people are more concerned about the loss of autonomy and independence in years of severe dementia than about pain and suffering in their last months. To address this concern, people could write advance directives for physician-assisted death in dementia. Should such directives be implemented even though, at the time, the person (...)
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  5. Paul T. Menzel (2012). It's Who You Know. Commentary. Hastings Center Report 42 (2):13.
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  6. Paul T. Menzel (2012). Saved From Themselves. Hastings Center Report 42 (5):18-20.
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  7. Paul T. Menzel (2011). Dishonesty, Ignorance, or What? Hastings Center Report 41 (2):16-17.
    We hardly regard politics—certainly not the words of politicians—as a realm where truth and honesty are closely protected. Public ignorance undoubtedly often pairs with politicians' disregard for accuracy to allow lies to pass. It is still galling, though, when political process and public reflection are stubbornly resistant to the obvious. It is more disturbing yet if the ignorance seems almost willing—a deeper kind of dishonesty in and with ourselves.By nature I am neither cynic, nor pessimist, nor one who disdains politics (...)
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  8. Paul T. Menzel (2011). The Cultural Moral Right to a Basic Minimum of Accessible Health Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (1):79-119.
    In the United States, amid the fractious politics of attempting to achieve something close to universal access to basic health care, two impressions are likely to feed skepticism about the status of a right to universal access: the moral principles that underlie any right to universal access may seem incredibly "ideal," not well rooted in the society's actual fabric, and the necessary practical and political attempts to limit the scope of universally accessible care to make its achievement realistic may seem (...)
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  9. Paul T. Menzel (2011). The Many Vs. The Few. Hastings Center Report 42 (5):5-6.
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  10. Paul T. Menzel (2011). That Personal Touch. Hastings Center Report 41 (3):7.
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  11. Paul T. Menzel (2011). To the Editor. Hastings Center Report 41 (3):7-7.
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  12. Paul T. Menzel (2011). The Value of Life at the End of Life: A Critical Assessment of Hope and Other Factors. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):215-223.
    Low opportunity cost, weak influence of quality of life in the face of death, the social value of life extension to others, shifting psychological reference points, and hope have been proposed as factors to explain why people apparently perceive marginal life extension at the end of life to have disproportionately greater value than its length. Such value may help to explain why medical spending to extend life at the end of life is as high as it is, and the various (...)
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  13. Paul T. Menzel (2010). Complete Lives, Short Lives, and the Challenge of Legitimacy. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):50 – 52.
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  14. Paul T. Menzel (2010). Just Access to Health Care and Pharmaceuticals. In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  15. Paul T. Menzel (2009). Are Patents an Efficient and Internationally Fair Means of Funding Research & Development for New Medicines? In Denis Gordon Arnold (ed.), Ethics and the Business of Biomedicine. Cambridge University Press. 62.
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  16. Paul T. Menzel (2009). The Health Care Cost Monitor. Hastings Center Report 39 (5):6-6.
     
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  17. Alan Rubenstein, John P. Lizza & Paul T. Menzel (2009). And She's Not Only Merely Dead, She's Really Most Sincerely Dead. Hastings Center Report 39 (5):4-6.
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  18. Paul T. Menzel (2008). A Path to Universal Access. Hastings Center Report 38 (1):34-36.
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  19. Paul T. Menzel (2008). Too Hot for Politics to Handle?: Hard Questions About Health Insurance. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 12-14.
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  20. Paul T. Menzel & Donald Light (2006). A Conservative Case for Universal Access to Health Care. Hastings Center Report 36 (4):36-45.
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  21. Paul T. Menzel (2003). How Compatible Are Liberty and Equality in Structuring a Health Care System? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (3):281 – 306.
    In their normative role in shaping the basic structure of a health care system, liberty and equality are often thought to conflict so sharply that health policy is condemned to remain an ideological battleground. In this paper, I will articulate my own view of why much of the apparently fundamental conflict between individual liberty and responsibility, on the one hand, and equality and equality's related concern for cost-efficiency, on the other hand, is less intractable than it is usually assumed to (...)
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  22. Denis G. Arnold & Paul T. Menzel (1998). When Comes “The End of the Day?”: A Comment on the Dialogue Between Dax Cowart and Robert Burt. Hastings Center Report 28 (1):25-27.
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  23. Paul T. Menzel (1995). Paper Four: Non-Compliance: Fair or Free-Riding. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 3 (2):113-115.
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  24. Paul T. Menzel (1995). QALYs: Maximisation, Distribution and Consent. A Response to Alan Williams. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 3 (3):226-229.
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  25. Paul T. Menzel (1995). To Anyone Morally Perplexed About the Politics of US Health Care. Health Care Analysis 3 (1):68-70.
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  26. Paul T. Menzel (1994). Rescuing Lives: Can't We Count? Hastings Center Report 24 (1):22-23.
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  27. Paul T. Menzel (1993). Double Agency and the Ethics of Rationing Health Care: A Response to Marcia Angell. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (3):287-292.
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  28. Paul T. Menzel (1993). Healthy Realism. Hastings Center Report 23 (2):44-45.
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  29. Paul T. Menzel (1992). Equality, Autonomy, and Efficiency: What Health Care System Should We Have? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (1):33-57.
    has a wide range of options in choosing a health care system. Rational choice of a system depends on analysis and prioritization of the basis moral goals of equitable access to all citizens, the just sharing of financial costs between well and ill, respect for the values and choices of subscribers and patients, and efficiency in the delivery of costworthy care. These moral goals themselves, however, tell us little about what health care system the United States should have. Equitable access (...)
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  30. Paul T. Menzel (1992). Oregon's Denial. Hastings Center Report 22 (6):21-25.
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  31. Paul T. Menzel (1992). Some Ethical Costs of Rationing. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (1-2):57-66.
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  32. Paul T. Menzel (1990). Public Philosophy: Distinction Without Authority. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (4):411-424.
    An assumed core of normative ethical principles may constitute a philosophically proper framework within which public policy should be formulated, but it seldom provides any substantive solutions. To generate public policy on bioethical issues, participants still need to confront underlying philosophical controversies. Professional philosophers' proper role in that process is to clarify major philosophical options, to press wider-ranging concistency questions, and to bring more parties into the philosophical debate itself by arguing for particular substantive claims. Though questions of fact that (...)
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  33. Paul T. Menzel (1989). Review Essay. Bioethics 3 (3):245–253.
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  34. Paul T. Menzel (1988). Book Review:Technology and Justice. George Parkin Grant. [REVIEW] Ethics 98 (4):867-.
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  35. Paul T. Menzel (1987). Economic Competition in Health Care: A Moral Assessment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (1):63-84.
    Economic competition threatens equity in the delivery of health care. This essay examines four of the various ways in which it does that: the reduction of charity care, increased patient cost-sharing, "cream-skimming" of healthy subscribers, and lack of information to patients about rationed care that is not prescribed. In all four cases, society must guard against distinct inequities and injustices, but also in all four, either the particular problem is not inherent in competition or, though inherent, it is not irremediable. (...)
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  36. Robert L. Greenwood, Howard P. Kainz, John F. Haught & Paul T. Menzel (1984). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 10 (1):141-144.
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  37. Paul T. Menzel (1979). Are Killing and Letting Die Morally Different in Medical Contexts? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (3):269-293.
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  38. Paul T. Menzel (1975). Divine Grace and Love: Continuing Trouble for a Logically Non-Dependent Religious Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 3 (2):255 - 269.
    Carney and Graber have recently claimed that religious ethics can have its ultimate foundation in charismatic divine love and grace, without logically presupposing independent ethical principles. While their defense of the autonomy of religious ethics is successful against many typical philosophical critiques, their derivation of ethical principles from divine realities is not essentially but only contextually religious. Since divine elements make no crucial difference to that derivation, religious ethics contains essentially the same derivation of ethical principles from facts as does (...)
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  39. Paul T. Menzel (1970). Epiphenomenalism and Metaethical Non-Naturalism. Journal of Value Inquiry 4 (1):43-55.
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