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Paul Wood [21]Paul B. Wood [4]Paul M. Wood [3]
  1. Claire Etchegaray, Knud Haakonssen, Daniel Schulthess, David Stauffer & Paul Wood (2012). The Correspondence of Dugald Stewart, Pierre Prevost, and Their Circle, 1794–1829. History of European Ideas 38 (1):19-73.
  2. Claire Etchegaray, Knud Haakonssen, Daniel Schulthess, David Stauffer & Paul Wood (2012). The Context of the Stewart–Prevost Correspondence. History of European Ideas 38 (1):5-18.
    Summary The correspondence in this issue of History of European Ideas has not previously been published. It is the surviving part of the epistolary exchange between Dugald Stewart and the Genevan professor and man of letters Pierre Prevost (1751?1839) from the 1790s to the 1820s. To this are added several closely connected letters to and from their associates. This correspondence is striking evidence of the republic of letters continuing to flourish in the aftermath of the French Revolution, illustrating the transmission (...)
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  3. Knud Haakonssen & Paul Wood (2012). Introduction. History of European Ideas 38 (1):1-4.
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  4. Richard B. Sher & Paul Wood (2012). Much Ado About Dugald: The Chequered Career of Dugald Stewart's Letter to Sir William Forbes on James Beattie's Essay on Truth. History of European Ideas 38 (1):74-102.
    Summary Although Sir William Forbes of Pitsligo's An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie has long served as an invaluable resource for those interested in Beattie's life and thought, there has been little scholarship on the genesis of Forbes's book. This article considers the role played by Dugald Stewart?as well as that of his friend, Archibald Alison?in the making of Forbes's Life of Beattie. It also examines the reasons for Forbes's decision not to print Stewart's letter in (...)
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  5. Paul Wood (2012). Dugald Stewart's Original Letter on James Beattie's Essay on Truth, 1805–1806. History of European Ideas 38 (1):103-121.
    Summary When Sir William Forbes of Pitsligo was preparing his An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie (1806) for the press, he asked his friend Dugald Stewart to contribute a summary and assessment of the argument of Beattie's most famous philosophical work, the Essay on the Nature and Immutability of Truth (1770). After some delay, in late 1805 or early 1806 Stewart sent to Forbes a lengthy letter in which he criticised Beattie's appeal to the principles of (...)
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  6. Paul Wood (2010). Review of David B. Wilson, Seeking Nature's Logic: Natural Philosophy in the Scottish Enlightenment. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (3).
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  7. Paul Wood (2010). The Fittest Man in the Kingdom. Hume Studies 23 (2):277-313.
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  8. Paul M. Wood & Laurel Waterman (2008). Sustainability Impeded. Environmental Ethics 30 (2):159-174.
    Some anthropogenic environmental changes that produce net benefits for the current generation will also produce foreseeable net harms to future generations. Well recognized as “time-lag effects,” these changes are environmental issues with strongly differential benefits and burdens between generations. Some of the world’s largest environmental issues fall into this category, including biodiversity loss and global climate change. The intractability of these issues for Western governments is not merely a practical problem of avoiding unpopular policy options; it is a theoretical problem (...)
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  9. Paul Wood (2004). Hume's Scepticism and the Science of Human Nature (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (1):109-110.
  10. Paul Wood (2004). Thomas Reid and The Tree of the Sciences. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 2 (2):119-136.
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  11. Paul M. Wood (2004). Intergenerational Justice and Curtailments on the Discretionary Powers of Governments. Environmental Ethics 26 (4):411-428.
    Governments of all nations presume they possess full discretionary policymaking powers over the lands and waters within their geopolitical boundaries. At least one global environmental issue—the rapid loss of the world’s biodiversity, the sixth major mass extinction event in geological time—challenges the legitimacy of this presumption. Increment by increment, the present generation is depleting the world’s biodiversity by way of altering species’ habitats for the sake of short term economic gain. When biodiversity is understood as an essential environmental condition—essential in (...)
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  12. Paul Wood (ed.) (2003). The Correspondence of Thomas Reid. Penn State University Press.
     
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  13. Paul Wood (2003). Science in the Scottish Enlightenment. In Alexander Broadie (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment. Cambridge University Press. 94--116.
  14. Paul B. Wood (2003). Thomas Reid and Scepticism: His Reliabilist Response (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):420-421.
  15. Paul Wood (2001). The Pursuit of “Terrorists” in Chechnya: Blood on Whose Hands? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 2 (3):128-139.
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  16. Paul B. Wood (2001). Who Is Thomas Reid? Reid Studies 5 (1):35.
     
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  17. Maria Davradou & Paul Wood (2000). The Promotion of Individual Autonomy in Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 22 (1):73-84.
    In his book The Morality of Freedom, Joseph Raz argues that the promotion of personal autonomy can serve as a constitutive principle for a comprehensive political theory. He maintains that three conditions are necessary for attainment of individual autonomy: appropriate mental abilities, an adequate range of options, and independence. In this essay, by focusing on Raz’s conception of an adequate range of options, we suggest that Raz’s theory justifies environmental conservation in general. We present an empirical framework of present-day assaults (...)
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  18. Paul Wood (2000). The Promotion of Individual Autonomy in Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 22 (1):73-84.
    In his book The Morality of Freedom, Joseph Raz argues that the promotion of personal autonomy can serve as a constitutive principle for a comprehensive political theory. He maintains that three conditions are necessary for attainment of individual autonomy: appropriate mental abilities, an adequate range of options, and independence. In this essay, by focusing on Raz’s conception of an adequate range of options, we suggest that Raz’s theory justifies environmental conservation in general. We present an empirical framework of present-day assaults (...)
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  19. Paul Wood (1998). In a Dark Wood. Environmental Ethics 20 (2):215-218.
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  20. Paul Wood (1998). Reid, Parallel Lines, and the Geometry of Visibles. Reid Studies 2 (1):27-41.
     
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  21. Paul Wood (1997). “The Fittest Man in the Kingdom”. Hume Studies 23 (2):277-313.
  22. Paul M. Wood (1997). Biodiversity as the Source of Biological Resources: A New Look at Biodiversity Values. Environmental Values 6 (3):251 - 268.
    The value of biodiversity is usually confused with the value of biological resources, both actual and potential. A sharp distinction between biological resources and biodiversity offers a clearer insight into the value of biodiversity itself and therefore the need to preserve it. Biodiversity can be defined abstractly as the differences among biological entities. Using this definition, biodiversity can be seen more appropriately as: (a) a necessary precondition for the long term maintenance of biological resources, and therefore, (b) an essential environmental (...)
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  23. Paul Wood (1995). A Social History of Truth. Hume Studies 21 (2):355-356.
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  24. Paul Wood (1995). A Social History of Truth: Civility and Science in Seventeenth Century England (Review). Hume Studies 21 (2):355-356.
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  25. Paul Wood (ed.) (1995). Thomas Reid on the Animate Creation: Papers Relating to the Life Sciences. Penn State University Press.
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  26. Paul Wood (1990). Science and the Pursuit of Virtue in the Aberdeen Enlightenment. In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in the Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment. Oxford University Press. 127--49.
  27. Paul B. Wood (1990). The Natural History of Man in the Scottish Enlightenment. History of Science 28:89-123.
  28. Michael Hunter & Paul B. Wood (1986). Towards Solomon's House: Rival Strategies for Reforming the Early Royal Society. History of Science 24:49-108.
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