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  1.  14
    Pauline Chazan (1998). The Moral Self. Routledge.
    The Moral Self addresses the question of how morality enters into our lives. Pauline Chazan draws upon psychology, moral philosophy, and literary interpretation to rebut the view that morality's role is to limit desire and control self-love. Preserving the ancients' connection between what is good for the self and what is morally good, Chazan argues that a certain kind of care for the self is central to moral agency. This book offers a dynamic interdisciplinary slant on the discussion of moral (...)
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  2.  48
    Pauline Chazan (1998). Self-Esteem, Self-Respect, and Love of Self: Ways of Valuing the Self. Philosophia 26 (1-2):41-63.
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    Pauline Chazan (1992). Pride, Virtue, and Self-Hood: A Reconstruction of Hume. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):45 - 64.
  4.  21
    Pauline Chazan (1993). Rousseau as Psycho-Social Moralist: The Distinction Between Amour De Soi and Amour-Propre. History of Philosophy Quarterly 10 (4):341 - 354.
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  5. Pauline Chazan (2002). The Moral Self. Routledge.
    The Moral Self addresses the question of how morality enters into our lives. Pauline Chazan draws upon psychology, r ral philosophy and literary interpretation to rebut the view that morality's role is to limit desire and control self-love. Perserving the ancients' connection between what is good for the self and what is morally good, Chazan argues that a certain kind of care for the self is central to moral agency. Her intriguing argument begins with a critical examination of the views (...)
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