Search results for 'Peace Judaism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Robert Eisen (2011). The Peace and Violence of Judaism: From the Bible to Modern Zionism. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- The Bible -- Rabbinic Judaism -- Medieval Jewish philosophy -- Kabbalah -- Modern Zionism -- Conclusions.
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  2.  1
    Alick Isaacs (2011). A Prophetic Peace: Judaism, Religion, and Politics. Indiana University Press.
    Challenging deeply held convictions about Judaism, Zionism, war, and peace, Alick Isaacs's combat experience in the second Lebanon war provoked him to search for a way of reconciling the belligerence of religion with its messages of peace. In his insightful readings of the texts of Biblical prophecy and rabbinic law, Isaacs draws on the writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Jacques Derrida, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Martin Buber, among others, to propose an ambitious vision of religiously inspired peace. (...)
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  3.  4
    Oliver Leaman (2004). Peace and Judaism. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications 29.
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  4.  20
    Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.) (2004). Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications.
    Introduction By Charles Randall Paul Thank you very much. Thank you very much Reverend Kowalski. I will now introduce our panel. I'll make my own remarks I ...
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  5. R. A. Steinsaltz (2005). Peace Without Conciliation: The Irrelevance of "Toleration" in Judaism. Common Knowledge 11 (1):41-47.
  6.  6
    Adin Steinsaltz (forthcoming). Peace Without Conciliation: The Irrelevance of "Toleration" in Judaism. Common Knowledge 11 (1):41-47.
  7.  1
    R. G. Fuks-Mansfeld (1991). War and Peace in Biblical and Post-Biblical Judaism. Grotiana 12 (1):5-12.
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  8. Yigal Levin & Amnon Shapira (eds.) (2011). War and Peace in Jewish Tradition: From the Biblical World to the Present. Routledge.
    War and peace in the Bible -- Theoretical aspects of war in rabbinic thought -- War and peace in modern Jewish thought and practice -- Israel, war, ethics and the media.
     
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  9. Yigal Levin & Amnon Shapira (eds.) (2012). War and Peace in Jewish Tradition: From the Biblical World to the Present: The Third Annual Conference of the Israel Heritage Department Ariel, Israel. Routledge.
    War and peace in the Bible -- Theoretical aspects of war in rabbinic thought -- War and peace in modern Jewish thought and practice -- Israel, war, ethics and the media.
     
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  10.  5
    Christian Schuster (2010). Gerrie ter Haar, James J. Busuttil (Eds.) Bridge or Barrier: Religion, Violence and Visions for Peace. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):240-243.
    Gerrie ter Haar, James J. Busuttil (eds.) Bridge or barrier: religion, violence and visions for peace Ed. Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands, 2005.
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  11. Zelig Pliskin (2002). Harmony with Others: Formulas, Stories and Insights. Distributed by Mesorah Publications.
     
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  12.  14
    James Turner Johnson (2008). Thinking Comparatively About Religion and War. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (1):157-179.
    In contrast to the period when the "Journal of Religious Ethics" began publishing, the study of religion in relation to war and connected issues has prospered in recent years. This article examines three collections of essays providing comparative perspectives on these topics, two recently authored studies of Buddhism and Islam in relation to war, and a compendious collection of texts on Western moral tradition concerning war, peace, and related issues from classical Greece and Rome to the present.
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  13.  13
    Y. Michael Barilan (2004). The Vision of Vegetarianism and Peace: Rabbi Kook on the Ethical Treatment of Animals. History of the Human Sciences 17 (4):69-101.
    Rabbi HaCohen Kook’s essay on vegetarianism and peace, first published in instalments in 1903–4, and reissued 60 years later, is the only treatise in rabbinic Judaism on the relationship between humans and animals. It is here examined as central to his ethical beliefs. His writings, shaped by his background as rabbi and mystic, illuminate the history of environmental and applied ethics. A century ago, he perceived the main challenge that confronts reform movements: multiculturalism.
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  14.  3
    E. M. Macierowski (2004). Peace and War in St. Thomas Aquinas. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications 49.
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  15.  3
    John Brademas (2004). Reflections on Peace and War. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications 149.
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  16.  2
    Ah Asgari Yazdi (2004). " Peace" as Islam's Essential Soul According to Qur'anic Teachings. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications
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  17.  1
    Charles Randall Paul (2004). Peace, Religion, and Humanity. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications
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  18.  1
    James Turner Johnson (2004). Theoretical Contexts of Studies on Peace and Just War. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications
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  19.  1
    Hojjatol Islam Mahmood Mohammadi Araghi (2004). Islam and the Vision of the Universal Peace. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications
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  20.  1
    Reverend James A. Kowalski (2004). A Christian Vision of Peace in Global Conflict. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications
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  21. Gholamreza Aavani (2004). Islamic Vision of Peace and the Platonic Tradition. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications 103.
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  22. Mehdi Faridzadeh (2004). A Perspective on Peace in an Age of Claims for Just Wars. In Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications 287.
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  23. Seyyed Hossien (2004). The Islamic Vision of Peace: Divine and Human. In Mehdi Faridzadeh (ed.), Philosophies of Peace and Just War in Greek Philosophy and Religions of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Global Scholarly Publications 83.
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  24. Menachem Mendel Schneerson (2001). [Ṿa-Yishlaḥ Yehoshuʻa] =. Kehot Publication Society.
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  25. Michael Walzer (ed.) (2006). Law, Politics, and Morality in Judaism. Princeton University Press.
    This volume of collected essays by Michael Walzer seeks to bring a more concentrated focus on specifically Jewish outlooks regarding three key themes: "Political Order and Civil Society"; "Territory, Sovereignty, and International Society"; and "War and Peace.".
     
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  26. Hermann Cohen (2009). The Tent of Peace. In Hans Küng (ed.), How to Do Good & Avoid Evil: A Global Ethic From the Sources of Judaism. Skylight Paths Pub.
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  27. Hans Küng (2009). Afterword: A Vision of Hope : Religious Peace and a Global Ethic. In How to Do Good & Avoid Evil: A Global Ethic From the Sources of Judaism. Skylight Paths Pub.
     
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  28.  16
    Sara Ruddick (1989). Maternal Thinking: Towards a Politics of Peace. The Women's Press.
    The most popular uniting theme in feminist peace literature grounds women's peace work in mothering. I argue if maternal arguments do not address the variety of relationships different races and classes of mothers have to institutional violence and/or the military, then the resulting peace politics can only draw incomplete conclusions about the relationships between maternal work/thinking and peace. To illustrate this I compare two models of mothering: Sara Ruddick's decription of "maternal practice" and Patricia Hill Collins's (...)
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  29.  8
    Andrew Blom (2013). Democracy, Peace and the War System: The Democratic Peace Project. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 23 (2):3-20.
    The idea that peace prevails in the relations among liberal democratic states, given its first expression in Kant’s essay “Toward Perpetual Peace,” has gathered a great deal of attention in the post-Cold War period as both a testable hypothesis and a proposal for expanding peace through democratization. This article examines the explanations for how a democratic peace is achieved and sustained. It argues that, despite tendencies within democratic state relations toward peaceful conflict resolution, such a (...) is destabilized by continued adherence to a set of assumptions and practices which we might call, following Jane Addams and John Dewey, ‘the war system.’ In the context of the ideological and institutional supports of militarism, democratic states remain subject to the dynamics of conflict escalation that produce occasions for war. This war system is the undoing of the democratic peace. (shrink)
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  30. Richard Oxenberg, On the Complementarity of Judaism and Christianity.
    I write as a Jew who has come to see the Jewish and Christian religious movements as complementary, at least as each may be ideally envisioned. This complementarity does not entail the ‘supersession’ of Judaism or the negation of Judaism. It does not in any way imply that Jews should abandon Judaism. On the contrary, rightly seen it can lead to a greater affirmation of Judaism and of the teachings at Judaism's heart. In this article (...)
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  31.  12
    Jovan Babić (2015). Trust, Predictability and Lasting Peace. Facta Universitatis, Series: Philosophy, Sociology, Psychology and History 14 (No 1):1 – 14.
    The main focus in the paper is the connection between trust and peace which makes predictability as a necessary condition of the normalcy of life possible, especially collective and communal life. Peace is defined as a specific articulation of the distribution of (political) power within a society. Peace defined in such a way requires a set of rules (norms, or laws) needed for the stability of the established social state of affairs. The main purpose of those norms, (...)
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  32.  9
    James Bohman & Matthias Lutz-Bachmann (eds.) (1997). Perpetual Peace: Essays on Kant's Cosmopolitan Ideal. The MIT Press.
    In 1795 Immanuel Kant published an essay entitled "Toward Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch." The immediate occasion for the essay was the March 1795 signing of the Treaty of Basel by Prussia and revolutionary France, which Kant condemned as only "the suspension of hostilities, not a peace." In the essay, Kant argues that it is humankind's immediate duty to solve the problem of violence and enter into the cosmopolitan ideal of a universal community of all peoples governed by (...)
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  33. Pauline Kleingeld (2004). Approaching Perpetual Peace: Kant’s Defence of a League of States and His Ideal of a World Federation. European Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):304-325.
    There exists a standard view of Kant’s position on global order and this view informs much of current Kantian political theory. This standard view is that Kant advocates a voluntary league of states and rejects the ideal of a federative state of states as dangerous, unrealistic, and conceptually incoherent. This standard interpretation is usually thought to fall victim to three equally standard objections. In this essay, I argue that the standard interpretation is mistaken and that the three standard objections miss (...)
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  34. Otfried Höffe (2006). Kant's Cosmopolitan Theory of Law and Peace. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant is widely acknowledged for his critique of theoretical reason, his universalistic ethics, and his aesthetics. Scholars, however, often ignore his achievements in the philosophy of law and government. At least four innovations that are still relevant today can be attributed to Kant. He is the first thinker, and to date the only great thinker, to have elevated the concept of peace to the status of a foundational concept of philosophy. Kant links this concept to the political innovation of (...)
     
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  35. Karen Armstrong (1993). A History of God: The 4000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Gramercy Books.
    Over 700,000 copies of the original hardcover and paperback editions of this stunningly popular book have been sold. Karen Armstrong's superbly readable exploration of how the three dominant monotheistic religions of the world—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—have shaped and altered the conception of God is a tour de force. One of Britain's foremost commentators on religious affairs, Armstrong traces the history of how men and women have perceived and experienced God, from the time of Abraham to the present. From classical (...)
     
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  36.  4
    Michael Fagenblat (2010). A Covenant of Creatures: Levinas's Philosophy of Judaism. Stanford University Press.
    Rejecting the distinction Levinas asserted between Judaism and philosophy, this book reads his philosophical works, "Totality and Infinity" and "Otherwise than ...
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  37. Robert S. Taylor (2010). Kant's Political Religion: The Transparency of Perpetual Peace and the Highest Good. Review of Politics 72 (1):1-24.
    Scholars have long debated the relationship between Kant’s doctrine of right and his doctrine of virtue (including his moral religion or ethico-theology), which are the two branches of his moral philosophy. This article will examine the intimate connection in his practical philosophy between perpetual peace and the highest good, between political and ethico-religious communities, and between the types of transparency peculiar to each. It will show how domestic and international right provides a framework for the development of ethical communities, (...)
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  38.  28
    Rem B. Edwards (2014). Judaism, Process Theology, and Formal Axiology: A Preliminary Study. Process Studies 43 (2):87-103.
    This article approaches Judaism through Rabbi Bradley S. Artson’s book, God of Becoming and Relationships: The Dynamic Nature of Process Theology. It explores his understanding of how Jewish theology should and does cohere with central features of both process theology and Robert S. Hartman’s formal axiology. These include the axiological/process concept of God, the intrinsic value and valuation of God and unique human beings, and Jewish extrinsic and systemic values, value combinations, and value rankings.
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  39.  47
    Robert A. Hackett (2010). Journalism for Peace and Justice: Towards a Comparative Analysis of Media Paradigms. Studies in Social Justice 4 (2):179-198.
    This paper compares different normative and institutional paradigms of journalism with respect to peaceful conflict resolution and democratic communication. It begins with the problematic but still dominant 'regime of objectivity,' and then considers three contemporary challengers: peace journalism, alternative media, and media democratization/communication rights movements. The paradigms are compared in terms of such factors as public philosophy, epistemological assumptions, characteristic practices, institutional entailments, relationship to dominant institutions and power structures, allies and opponents, and antagonisms and synergies between them. I (...)
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  40.  12
    Francesco Tomasoni (2003). Modernity and the Final Aim of History: The Debate Over Judaism From Kant to the Young Hegelians. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This book is intended not only for scholars and students in humanities, history (esp. the history of ideas), Jewish studies, philosophy (esp. the history of philosophy), and Christian theology, but also for those concerned with the roots of anti-Semitism and with the need for toleration and intercultural pluralism. Modernity and the Final Aim of History: * Combines the development of German philosophy from the Enlightenment to Idealism, and from Idealism to the revolutionary turning-point of the mid-nineteenth century with the Jewish (...)
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  41. Hermann Cohen (1972). Religion of Reason Out of the Sources of Judaism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Hermann Cohen's Religion of Reason, Out of the Sources of Judaism is widely taken to be the greatest work in Jewish philosophy and religious thought since Maimonides' Guide to the Perplexed. It is at once a Jewish book and a philosophical one: Jewish because it takes its material from the literary tradition that extends from the bible to the rabbis to the great medieval philosophers; philosophical because it studies that material in order to construct a worldview that is rational (...)
     
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  42.  9
    Ellen Y. Zhang (2012). Weapons Are Nothing but Ominous Instruments: The Daodejing's View on War and Peace. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):473-502.
    ABSTRACTThe Daodejing is an ancient Chinese text traditionally taken as a representative Daoist classic expressing a distinctive philosophy from the Warring States Period . This essay explicates the ethical dimensions of the DDJ paying attention to issues related to war and peace. The discussion consists of four parts: “naturalness” as an onto‐cosmological argument for a philosophy of harmony, balance, and peace; war as a sign of the disruption of the natural pattern of things initiated by the proliferation of (...)
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  43.  15
    Michael Fagenblat (2015). ‘The Passion of Israel’: The True Israel According to Levinas, or Judaism ‘as a Category of Being’. Sophia 54 (3):297-320.
    Across four decades of writing, Levinas repeatedly referred to the Holocaust as ‘the Passion of Israel at Auschwitz’. This deliberately Christological interpretation of the Holocaust raises questions about the respective roles of Judaism and Christianity in Levinas’ thought and seems at odds with his well-known view that suffering is ‘useless’. Basing my interpretation on the journals Levinas wrote as a prisoner of war and a radio talk he delivered in September 1945, I argue that his philosophical project is best (...)
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  44.  3
    Hanoch Ben-Pazi (forthcoming). Messianism’s Contribution to Political Philosophy: Peace and War in Levinas’s Totality and Infinity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-23.
    This article examines the impact of messianic thought on political philosophy in the theory of philosopher Emmanuel Levinas. Levinas’s work enables us to consider the political not only in terms of contemplation of the tension between the political and the ethical and of the ethical limits of politics but as an attempt to create ethical political thought. Discussion of the tension between the political and the ethical intensifies in wartime and in the context of militaristic thinking. At the same time, (...)
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  45.  26
    Charles P. Koerber (2009). Corporate Responsibility Standards: Current Implications and Future Possibilities for Peace Through Commerce. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):461 - 480.
    Calls for greater corporate responsibility have resulted in the creation of various extralegal mechanisms to shape corporate behavior. The number and popularity of corporate responsibility standards has grown tremendously in the last three decades. Current estimates suggest there may be over 300 standards that address various aspects of corporate behavior and responsibility (e. g., working conditions, human rights, protection of the natural environment, transparency, bribery). However, little is known about how these standards relate directly to the notion of peace (...)
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  46.  10
    Alison Bailey (1994). Mothering, Diversity, and Peace Politics. Hypatia 9 (2):188-198.
    The most popular uniting theme in feminist peace literature grounds women's peace work in mothering. I argue if maternal arguments do not address the variety of relationships different races and classes of mothers have to institutional violence and/or the military, then the resulting peace politics can only draw incomplete conclusions about the relationships between maternal work/thinking and peace. To illustrate this I compare two models of mothering: Sara Ruddick's decription of "maternal practice" and Patricia Hill Collins's (...)
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  47. Rusmir Mahmutćehajić (2000). The Denial of Bosnia. Penn State University Press.
    In 1997, Rusmir Mahmutćehajić, one of Bosnia’s leading public intellectuals, was scheduled to lecture on Bosnia at Stanford University but was unexpectedly denied an entry visa by American authorities. This book, first published in Bosnia in 1998, is an expanded version of that lecture. It is an indictment of the partition of Bosnia, formalized in 1995 by the Dayton Accord. It is also a plea for Bosnia’s communities to reject ethnic segregation and restore mutual trust. For the first time, English-speaking (...)
     
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  48.  20
    Marc Lavine (2009). From Scholarly Dialogue to Social Movement: Considerations and Implications for Peace Through Commerce. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):603 - 615.
    While Peace through Commerce (PTC) started as a conversation among a small group of scholars it has grown into an increasingly robust movement, giving rise to conferences, books, journal articles, and dialogue between scholars, managers, practitioners, government officials, and civil society actors, all of whom share an interest in the potential of commerce to foster greater peace. Because social movement scholarship explores the ability of collective interests to achieve social change it provides a useful lens through which to (...)
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  49.  11
    Hilary Charlesworth (2008). Are Women Peaceful? Reflections on the Role of Women in Peace-Building. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (3):347-361.
    This paper examines the way that women’s relationship to peace is constructed in international institutions and international law. It identifies a set of claims about women and peace that are typically made and considers these in light of women’s experience in the conflicts in Bougainville, East Timor and the Solomon Islands.
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  50. Charles Covell (1998). Kant and the Law of Peace: A Study in the Philosophy of International Law and International Relations. St. Martin's Press.
    Charles Covell examines the jurisprudential aspects of Kant's international thought, with particular reference to the argument of the treatise Perpetual Peace (1795). The book begins with a general outline of Kant's moral and political philosophy. In the discussion of Perpetual Peace that follows, it is explained how Kant saw law as providing the basis for peace among men and states in the international sphere, and how, in his exposition of the elements of the law of peace, (...)
     
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