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Profile: Per Sandin (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
  1. Martin Peterson & Per Sandin (2013). The Last Man Argument Revisited. Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (1):121-133.
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  2. Helena Röcklinsberg & Per Sandin (eds.) (2013). The Ethics of Consumption. Wageningen Academic Publishers.
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  3. Per Sandin, Erland Mårald, Aidan Davison, David E. Nye & Paul B. Thompson (2013). Book Symposium on The Agrarian Vision: Sustainability and Environmental Ethics by Paul B. Thompson. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 26 (3):301-320.
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  4. Per Sandin (2009). Approaches to Ethics for Corporate Crisis Management. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):109 - 116.
    The ethics of corporate crisis management is a seriously underdeveloped field. Among recent proposals in the area, two contributions stand out: Seeger and Ulmer’s (2001) virtue ethics approach to crisis management ethics and Simola’s (2003) ethics of care. In the first part of the paper, I argue that both contributions are problematic: Seeger and Ulmer focus on top management and propose virtues that lack substance and are in need of further development. Simola’s proposal is also fraught with difficulty, since it (...)
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  5. Per Sandin (2009). Firefighting Ethics. Ethical Perspectives 16 (2):225-251.
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  6. Per Sandin (2009). 10 Moral Paradoxes – by Saul Smilansky. Theoria 75 (1):65-66.
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  7. Per Sandin (2009). Supreme Emergencies Without the Bad Guys. Philosophia 37 (1):153-167.
    This paper discusses the application of the supreme emergency doctrine from just-war theory to non-antagonistic threats. Two versions of the doctrine are considered: Michael Walzer’s communitarian version and Brian Orend’s prudential one. I investigate first whether the doctrines are applicable to non-antagonistic threats, and second whether they are defensible. I argue that a version of Walzer’s doctrine seems to be applicable to non-antagonistic threats, but that it is very doubtful whether the doctrine is defensible. I also argue that Orend’s version (...)
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  8. Per Sandin & Martin Peterson (2009). Guest Editors' Introduction. Philosophy of Management 8 (2):1-2.
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  9. Per Sandin & Misse Wester (2009). The Moral Black Hole. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (3):291 - 301.
    It is commonly believed that people become selfish and turn to looting, price gouging, and other immoral behaviour in emergencies. This has been the basis for an argument justifying extraordinary measures in emergencies. It states that if emergencies are not curtailed, breakdown of moral norms threaten (‘the moral black hole’). Using the example of natural disasters, we argue that the validity of this argument in non-antagonistic situations, i.e. situations other than war and armed conflict, is highly questionable. Available evidence suggests (...)
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  10. Per Sandin (2008). Laws of Fear. Environmental Ethics 29 (1):107-110.
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  11. Per Sandin (2007). Bioethics and Armed Conflict: Moral Dilemmas of Medicine and War, by Michael Gross. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (01):131-133.
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  12. Per Sandin (2007). Collective Military Virtues. Journal of Military Ethics 6 (4):303-314.
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  13. Per Sandin (2007). Common-Sense Precaution and Varieties of the Precautionary Principle. In Tim Lewens (ed.), Risk: Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge.
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  14. Per Sandin (2007). Laws of Fear: Beyond the Precautionary Principle. Environmental Ethics 29 (1):107-110.
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  15. Per Sandin (2007). The Ethics of War: Shared Problems in Different Traditions. Theoria 73:244-247.
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  16. Per Sandin (2006). A Paradox Out of Context: Harris and Holm on the Precautionary Principle. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (02):175-183.
    The precautionary principle is frequently referred to in various momentous decisions affecting human health and the environment. It has been invoked in contexts as diverse as chemicals regulation, regulation of genetically modified organisms, and research into life-extending therapies. Precaution is not an unknown concept in medical contexts. One author even cites the Hippocratic Oath as a parallel to the precautionary principle. a.
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  17. Per Sandin (2006). Has Psychology Debunked Conceptual Analysis? Metaphilosophy 37 (1):26–33.
    The philosophical method of conceptual analysis has been criticised on the grounds that empirical psychological research has cast severe doubt on whether concepts exist in the form traditionally assumed, and that conceptual analysis therefore is doomed. This objection may be termed the Charge from Psychology. After a brief characterisation of conceptual analysis, I discuss the Charge from Psychology and argue that it is misdirected.
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  18. Per Sandin (2005). Naturalness and de Minimis Risk. Environmental Ethics 27 (2):191-200.
    In risk management, de minimis risk is the idea that risks that are sufficiently small, in terms of probabilities, ought to be disregarded. In the context of the distinction between disregarding a risk and accepting it, this paper examines one suggested way of determining how small risks ought to be disregarded, specifically, the natural-occurrence view of de minimis, which has been proposed by Alvin M. Weinberg, among others. It is based on the idea that “natural” background levels of risk should (...)
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  19. Per Sandin (2004). The Precautionary Principle and the Concept of Precaution. Environmental Values 13 (4):461 - 475.
    The precautionary principle is frequently invoked in environmental law and policy, and the debate around the principle indicates that there is little agreement on what 'taking precautions' means. The purpose of the present paper is to provide an improved conceptual foundation for this debate in the form of an explication of the concept of precaution. Distinctions between precaution and two related concepts, prevention and pessimism, are briefly discussed. The concept of precaution is analysed in terms of precautionary actions. It is (...)
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  20. Per Sandin (2004). Virtual Child Pornography and Utilitarianism. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 2 (4):217-223.
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