Search results for 'Perceiving' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Romane L. Clark (1979). Sensing, Perceiving, Thinking. Grazer Philosophische Studien/ 8:273-295.score: 24.0
    This paper is concerned with Chisholm's "adverbial theory of sensing". An attempt is made to give a literal statement of what it means "to sense redly" which is consistent with what Chisholm says about sensing and also meets various objections to adverbial theories. The paper concludes with a brief consideration of why it is that Chisholm does not offer an adverbial theory of perceiving, or of thinking in general, as well as of sensing.
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  2. Dan D. Crawford (1974). Bergmann on Perceiving, Sensing, and Appearing. American Philosophical Quarterly 11 (April):103-112.score: 22.0
    In this study I am going to present and discuss some of the central themes of Gustav Bergmann's theory of perception. I shall be concerned, however, only with "later Bergmann," that is, with the perceptual theory worked out in a series of essays in which Bergmann shifts from phenomenalism to a form of intentional realism. This label ("intentional realism") indicates the two dominant themes in Bergmann's later thought about perception: perceivings are analyzed as mental acts (thoughts) which are intentionally related (...)
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  3. Pierre Jacob (2005). Grasping and Perceiving Objects. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 241--283.score: 21.0
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  4. Roderick M. Chisholm (1957). Perceiving: A Philosophical Study. Cornell University Press.score: 21.0
    The purpose of this book is to develop a terminological structure in which private perceptions can be discussed publicly without bringing into existence the usual unnecessary philosophical problems of confused usage of language. chisholm displays an appraisive, quasi-ethical use of language, whereby he claims that a thing has some particular sensible property is to have adequate evidence that it actually does have that property. (staff).
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  5. W. D. Joske (1963). Inferring and Perceiving. Philosophical Review 72 (4):433-445.score: 21.0
  6. Charles A. Baylis (1959). Professor Chisholm on Perceiving. Journal of Philosophy 56 (September):773-790.score: 21.0
  7. Edward S. Casey (1979). Perceiving and Remembering. Review of Metaphysics 32 (March):407-436.score: 21.0
  8. Dan D. Crawford (1974). Propositional and Nonpropositional Perceiving. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (December):201-210.score: 21.0
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  9. Roy Wood Sellars (1959). Sensations as Guides to Perceiving. Mind 68 (January):2-15.score: 21.0
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  10. James R. Kuehl (1970). Perceiving and Imaging. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 31 (December):212-224.score: 21.0
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  11. M. J. Baker (1954). Perceiving, Imagining, and Being Mistaken. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 14 (June):520-535.score: 21.0
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  12. Elizabeth H. Wolgast (1958). Perceiving and Impressions. Philosophical Review 67 (April):226-236.score: 21.0
  13. Frank K. Fair (1976). Two Problems with Roderick Chisholm's Perceiving. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (June):547-550.score: 21.0
  14. Mark A. Changizi, Andrew Hsieh, Romi Nijhawan, Ryota Kanai & Shinsuke Shimojo (2008). Perceiving the Present and a Systematization of Illusions. Cognitive Science 32 (3):459-503.score: 21.0
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  15. James W. Cornman (1975). Chisholm on Sensing and Perceiving. In Keith Lehrer (ed.), Analysis And Metaphysics. Reidel. 11--33.score: 21.0
  16. Don Locke (1968). Perceiving and Thinking, Part I. Aristotelian Society 173:173-190.score: 21.0
     
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  17. Anthony M. Quinton (1968). Perceiving and Thinking, Part II. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 191:191-208.score: 21.0
     
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  18. John W. Yolton (1961). Thinking And Perceiving: A Study In The Philosophy Of Mind. Open Court.score: 21.0
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  19. Robert Briscoe (2010). Perceiving the Present: Systematization of Illusions or Illusion of Systematization? Cognitive Science 34 (8):1530-1542.score: 18.0
    Mark Changizi et al. (2008) claim that it is possible systematically to organize more than 50 kinds of illusions in a 7 × 4 matrix of 28 classes. This systematization, they further maintain, can be explained by the operation of a single visual processing latency correction mechanism that they call “perceiving the present” (PTP). This brief report raises some concerns about the way a number of illusions are classified by the proposed systematization. It also poses two general problems—one empirical (...)
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  20. Mitchell Green (2010). Perceiving Emotions. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 84 (1):45-61.score: 18.0
    I argue that it is possible literally to perceive the emotions of others. This account depends upon the possibility of perceiving a whole by perceiving one or more of its parts, and upon the view that emotions are complexes. After developing this account, I expound and reply to Rowland Stout's challenge to it. Stout is nevertheless sympathetic with the perceivability-of-emotions view. I thus scrutinize Stout's suggestion for a better defence of that view than I have provided, and offer (...)
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  21. Casey O'Callaghan (2010). Perceiving the Locations of Sounds. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):123--140.score: 18.0
    Frequently, we learn of the locations of things and events in our environment by means of hearing. Hearing, I argue, is a locational mode of perceiving with a robustly spatial nature. I defend three proposals. First, audition furnishes information about the locations of things and events in one's environment because auditory experience itself is spatial. Audition represents space. Second, we hear the locations of things and events by or in hearing locational information about their sounds. Third, we auditorily experience (...)
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  22. John Turri (2008). Practical and Epistemic Justification in Alston's Perceiving God. Faith and Philosophy 25 (3):290 - 299.score: 18.0
    This paper clarifies and evaluates a premise of William Alston’s argument in Perceiving God. The premise in question: if it is practically rational to engage in a doxastic practice, then it is epistemically rational to suppose that said practice is reliable. I first provide the background needed to understand how this premise fits into Alston’s main argument. I then present Alston’s main argument, and proceed to clarify, criticize, modify, and ultimately reject Alston’s argument for the premise in question. Without (...)
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  23. Bence Nanay (ed.) (2010). Perceiving the World. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    'Perceiving the World' offers 11 essays written especially for this book by some of the leading contemporary philosophers of perception: Susanna Siegel, Jesse ...
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  24. Adrian Haddock (2011). The Disjunctive Conception of Perceiving. Philosophical Explorations 14 (1):23-42.score: 18.0
    John McDowell's conception of perceptual knowledge commits him to the claim that if I perceive that P then I am in a position to know that I perceive that P. In the first part of this essay, I present some reasons to be suspicious of this claim - reasons which derive from a general argument against 'luminosity' - and suggest that McDowell can reject this claim, while holding on to almost all of the rest of his conception of perceptual knowledge, (...)
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  25. John Turri (2010). Does Perceiving Entail Knowing? Theoria 76 (3):197-206.score: 18.0
    This article accomplishes two closely connected things. First, it refutes an influential view about the relationship between perception and knowledge. In particular, it demonstrates that perceiving does not entail knowing. Second, it leverages that refutation to demonstrate that knowledge is not the most general factive propositional attitude.
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  26. Christian Coseru (2012). Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    What turns the continuous flow of experience into perceptually distinct objects? Can our verbal descriptions unambiguously capture what it is like to see, hear, or feel? How might we reason about the testimony that perception alone discloses? Christian Coseru proposes a rigorous and highly original way to answer these questions by developing a framework for understanding perception as a mode of apprehension that is intentionally constituted, pragmatically oriented, and causally effective. By engaging with recent discussions in phenomenology and analytic philosophy (...)
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  27. John C. Trueswell & Anna Papafragou, Perceiving and Remembering Events Cross-Linguistically: Evidence From Dual-Task Paradigms.score: 18.0
    What role does language play during attention allocation in perceiving and remembering events? We recorded adults‟ eye movements as they studied animated motion events for a later recognition task. We compared native speakers of two languages that use different means of expressing motion (Greek and English). In Experiment 1, eye movements revealed that, when event encoding was made difficult by requiring a concurrent task that did not involve language (tapping), participants spent extra time studying what their language treats as (...)
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  28. Peter Byrne (2000). Perceiving God and Realism. Philo 3 (2):74-88.score: 18.0
    The paper aims to move the debate between Alston and critics of Perceiving God forward by asking if Alston’s book establishes a case for a realist interpretation of Christian mystical perception. It is argued that critical comments on Alston’s paper in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research by Richard Gale point, when reinterpreted, to a crucial disparity between mystical perception and sense perception. A realist interpretation of the former is not prima facie warranted but a realist interpretation of the latter is. (...)
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  29. Amit Chaturvedi (2014). Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy by Christian Coseru (Review). Philosophy East and West 64 (2):506-513.score: 18.0
    In Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy, Christian Coseru makes the innovative and ambitious argument that the project of Indian Buddhist epistemology, as represented by thinkers in the Yogācāra tradition of Dignāga and Dharmakīrti, is continuous in many of its methods and conclusions with the phenomenological theories of Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, as well as with recent naturalistic approaches in epistemology and the philosophy of mind. In Coseru’s reading, Buddhism shares with phenomenology the attitude that (...)
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  30. R. Clark (1981). Sensing, Perceiving, Thinking. Grazer Philosophische Studien 12:273-95.score: 18.0
    This paper is concerned with Chisholm's "adverbial theory of sensing". An attempt is made to give a literal statement of what it means "to sense redly" which is consistent with what Chisholm says about sensing and also meets various objections to adverbial theories. The paper concludes with a brief consideration of why it is that Chisholm does not offer an adverbial theory of perceiving, or of thinking in general, as well as of sensing.
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  31. Felicity Aulino (2014). Perceiving the Social Body. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (3):415-441.score: 18.0
    This essay develops the concept of the “social body” as a metaphorical representation of hierarchical relationships in Thailand, as well as the physical embodiment of social, religious, and political structures. To do so, I trace the symbolic coordinates of groups that correspond to conceptions of individual bodies, along with the habituated means of perceiving as part of a collective. I argue that conventional Thai social interactions involve active attention to and care of the “social body,” in which differential roles (...)
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  32. Kevin Ochsner Jamil Zaki, Jochen Weber (2012). Task-Dependent Neural Bases of Perceiving Emotionally Expressive Targets. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Social cognition is fundamentally interpersonal: individuals’ behavior and dispositions critically affect their interaction partners’ information processing. However, cognitive neuroscience studies, partially because of methodological constraints, have remained largely “perceiver-centric:” focusing on the abilities, motivations, and goals of social perceivers while largely ignoring interpersonal effects. Here, we address this knowledge gap by examining the neural bases of perceiving emotionally expressive and inexpressive social “targets.” Sixteen perceivers were scanned using fMRI while they watched targets discussing emotional autobiographical events. Perceivers continuously rated (...)
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  33. Bence Nanay (2012). Perceiving Tropes. Erkenntnis 77 (1):1-14.score: 16.0
    There are two very different ways of thinking about perception. According to the first one, perception is representational: it represents the world as being a certain way. According to the second, perception is a genuine relation between the perceiver and a token object. These two views are thought to be incompatible. My aim is to work out the least problematic version of the representational view of perception that preserves the most important considerations in favor of the relational view. According to (...)
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  34. Sean Enda Power (2013). Perceiving External Things and the Time-Lag Argument. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):94-117.score: 16.0
    : We seem to directly perceive external things. But can we? According to the time-lag argument, we cannot. What we directly perceive happens now. There is a time-lag between our perceptions and the external things we seem to directly perceive; these external things happen in the past; thus, what we directly perceive must be something else, for example, sense-data, and we can only at best indirectly perceive other things. This paper examines the time-lag argument given contemporary metaphysics. I argue that (...)
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  35. Shaun Gallagher, Perceiving Others in Action / la Perception d'Autrui En Action.score: 16.0
    In a New York Times article last month, entitled Cells that read minds, the neuroscience reporter, Sandra Blakeslee (January 10, 2006) provided a list of all the things that mirror neurons can explain. As we know, mirror neurons, discovered by Rizzolattis group in Parma, are neurons that are activated when we engage in action, and when we perceive intentional movement in another person. According to Blakeslee and the scientists she interviewed, mirror neurons explain not only how we are capable of (...)
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  36. Élisabeth Pacherie, Perceiving Intentions.score: 16.0
    I will concentrate on the 'executive' conception of intentions and intentional actions. I will argue that intentional bodily movements have distinctive observable characteristics that set them apart from non-intentional bodily motions. I will also argue that that when we observe an action performed by someone else, the perceptual representations we form contain information about the dynamics of movements and their relations to objects in the scene that can be exploited in order to identify at least the more basic intentions of (...)
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  37. Eric vd Luft (2013). Bullough, Pepper, Merleau-Ponty, and the Phenomenology of Perceiving Animals. Evental Aesthetics 2 (2):111-123.score: 16.0
    The process of optimizing psychical distance to achieve the best possible aesthetic effect has been well-known among philosophers of art ever since Edward Bullough formulated the concept in 1912. Although it is typically analyzed as a one-way process, it nevertheless becomes a reciprocal or intersubjective process when the object of our aesthetic perception is our “other.” This is equally true for animal “others” as for our fellow human “others.” Anything animate can fix us in its gaze and thereby prompt or (...)
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  38. Jakub Mácha (2009). Metaphor: Perceiving an Internal Relation. In Contributions of the Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.score: 16.0
    The problem of metaphor has come to a noteworthy revival in the analytical philosophy of today. Despite all progress that has been made, the majority of important studies consider the function of metaphor as an analogue to visual perception. Such comparison may be conceived as metaphor as well. In his late philosophy, Wittgenstein spent a lot of effort to explain the use of the expression "seeing as". I argue that his explanations can be transposed to the explanation of the function (...)
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  39. Elizabeth S. Spelke, Perceiving Bimodally Specified Events in Infancy.score: 16.0
    Four-month-old infants can perceive bimodally speciiied events. They respond to relationships between the optic and acoustic stimulation that carries information about an object. Infants can do this by detecting the temporal synchrony of an object’s sounds and its optically specified impacts. They are sensitive both to the common tempo and to the simultaneity of such sounds and visible impacts. These findings support the view that intermodal perception depends at least in part on the detection of invariant relationships in patterns of (...)
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  40. Aaron Sloman, Polyflaps as a Domain for Perceiving, Acting and Learning in a 3-D World.score: 16.0
    Test domains for AI can have a deep impact on research. The polyflap domain is proposed for testing complex AI theories about architectures, mechanisms and forms of representation involved in features of human and animal intelligence that evolved to enable perception, action, and learning in diverse environments containing things that we can perceive and manipulate, and many complex processes involving objects that differ in shape, materials, causal properties, and relations to one another. We need a test environment that is rich (...)
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  41. George Seddon (2001). Perceiving the Pilbara: Finding the Key to the Country. Thesis Eleven 65 (1):69-91.score: 16.0
    The land and the people of the Pilbara in north-western Australia have been perceived, and the landscape conceptualized, used or abused (depending on one's perception), in a variety of ways through time. Differing perceptions have been reflected and modified by linguistic use, especially the metaphors applied, including the search for `a key to the country'; by conditions of observation, including the means of transport; by changing economic and utilitarian values; by images generated by painters and photographers; by the commodifications of (...)
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  42. I. B. Phillips (2013). Perceiving the Passing of Time. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 113 (3):225-252.score: 16.0
    Duration distortions familiar from trauma present an apparent counterexample to what we might call the naive view of duration perception. I argue that such distortions constitute a counterexample to naiveté only on the assumption that we perceive duration absolutely. This assumption can seem mandatory if we think of the alternative, relative view as limiting our awareness to the relative durations of perceptually presented events. However, once we recognize the constant presence of a stream of non-perceptual conscious mental activity, we can (...)
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  43. Pablo Briñol, Kenneth G. DeMarree & K. Rachelle Smith (2010). The Role of Embodied Change in Perceiving and Processing Facial Expressions of Others. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):437-438.score: 16.0
    The embodied simulation of smiles involves motor activity that often changes the perceivers' own emotional experience (e.g., smiling can make us feel happy). Although Niedenthal et al. mention this possibility, the psychological processes by which embodiment changes emotions and their consequences for processing other emotions are not discussed in the target article's review. We argue that understanding the processes initiated by embodiment is important for a complete understanding of the effects of embodiment on emotion perception.
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  44. Alejandro Lleras Simona Buetti (2012). Perceiving Control Over Aversive and Fearful Events Can Alter How We Experience Those Events: An Investigation of Time Perception in Spider-Fearful Individuals. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 16.0
    We used a time perception task to study the effects of the subjective experience of control on emotion and cognitive processing. This task is uniquely sensitive to the emotionality of the stimuli: high-arousing negative stimuli are perceived as lasting longer than high-arousing positive events, while the opposite pattern is observed for low-arousing stimuli. We evaluated the temporal distortions of emotionally-charged events in non-anxious (Experiments 1 and 5) and spider-fearful individuals (Experiments 2-4). Participants were shown images of varying durations between 400 (...)
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  45. Sarah L. Strout, Rosemarie I. Sokol, James D. Laird & Nicholas S. Thompson (2004). The Evolutionary Foundation of Perceiving One's Own Emotions. Behavior and Philosophy 32 (2):493 - 502.score: 16.0
    Much research in the field of emotions has shown that people differ in the cues that they use to perceive their own emotions. People who are more responsive to personal cues (personal cuers) make use of cues arising from their own bodies and behavior; people who are less responsive to personal cues (situational cuers) make use of cues arising from the world around them. An evolutionary explanation of this well-documented phenomenon is that it occurs because of the operation of a (...)
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  46. Dustin Stokes (2012). Perceiving and Desiring: A New Look at the Cognitive Penetrability of Experience. Philosophical Studies 158 (3):479-92.score: 15.0
    This paper considers an orectic penetration hypothesis which says that desires and desire-like states may influence perceptual experience in a non-externally mediated way. This hypothesis is clarified with a definition, which serves further to distinguish the interesting target phenomenon from trivial and non-genuine instances of desire-influenced perception. Orectic penetration is an interesting possible case of the cognitive penetrability of perceptual experience. The orectic penetration hypothesis is thus incompatible with the more common thesis that perception is cognitively impenetrable. It is of (...)
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  47. William P. Alston (1991). Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience. Cornell University Press.score: 15.0
    Introduction i. Character of the Book The central thesis of this book is that experiential awareness of God, or as I shall be saying, the perception of God, ...
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  48. Robert G. Hudson (2000). Perceiving Empirical Objects Directly. Erkenntnis 52 (3):357-371.score: 15.0
    The goal of this paper is to defend the claim that there is such a thing as direct perception, where by ‘direct perception’ I mean perception unmediated by theorizing or concepts. The basis for my defense is a general philosophic perspective which I call ‘empiricist philosophy’. In brief, empiricist philosophy (as I have defined it) is untenable without the occurrence of direct perception. It is untenable without direct perception because, otherwise, one can't escape the hermeneutic circle, as this phrase is (...)
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  49. William P. Alston (1986). Perceiving God. Journal of Philosophy 83 (11):655-665.score: 15.0
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