Search results for 'Perceiving' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  92
    Roderick M. Chisholm (1957). Perceiving: A Philosophical Study. Cornell University Press.
    The purpose of this book is to develop a terminological structure in which private perceptions can be discussed publicly without bringing into existence the usual unnecessary philosophical problems of confused usage of language. chisholm displays an appraisive, quasi-ethical use of language, whereby he claims that a thing has some particular sensible property is to have adequate evidence that it actually does have that property. (staff).
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  2.  20
    Romane L. Clark (1979). Sensing, Perceiving, Thinking. Grazer Philosophische Studien/ 8:273-295.
    This paper is concerned with Chisholm's "adverbial theory of sensing". An attempt is made to give a literal statement of what it means "to sense redly" which is consistent with what Chisholm says about sensing and also meets various objections to adverbial theories. The paper concludes with a brief consideration of why it is that Chisholm does not offer an adverbial theory of perceiving, or of thinking in general, as well as of sensing.
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  3.  8
    Mark A. Changizi, Andrew Hsieh, Romi Nijhawan, Ryota Kanai & Shinsuke Shimojo (2008). Perceiving the Present and a Systematization of Illusions. Cognitive Science 32 (3):459-503.
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  4.  74
    Pierre Jacob (2005). Grasping and Perceiving Objects. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 241--283.
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  5.  80
    Roy Wood Sellars (1959). Sensations as Guides to Perceiving. Mind 68 (January):2-15.
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  6.  47
    Charles A. Baylis (1959). Professor Chisholm on Perceiving. Journal of Philosophy 56 (September):773-790.
  7.  26
    Edward S. Casey (1979). Perceiving and Remembering. Review of Metaphysics 32 (March):407-436.
  8.  36
    W. D. Joske (1963). Inferring and Perceiving. Philosophical Review 72 (4):433-445.
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  9.  23
    Dan D. Crawford (1974). Bergmann on Perceiving, Sensing, and Appearing. American Philosophical Quarterly 11 (April):103-112.
    In this study I am going to present and discuss some of the central themes of Gustav Bergmann's theory of perception. I shall be concerned, however, only with "later Bergmann," that is, with the perceptual theory worked out in a series of essays in which Bergmann shifts from phenomenalism to a form of intentional realism. This label ("intentional realism") indicates the two dominant themes in Bergmann's later thought about perception: perceivings are analyzed as mental acts (thoughts) which are intentionally related (...)
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  10.  27
    Dan D. Crawford (1974). Propositional and Nonpropositional Perceiving. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (December):201-210.
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  11.  5
    James W. Cornman (1975). Chisholm on Sensing and Perceiving. In Keith Lehrer (ed.), Analysis And Metaphysics. Reidel 11--33.
  12.  17
    James R. Kuehl (1970). Perceiving and Imaging. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 31 (December):212-224.
  13.  16
    Elizabeth H. Wolgast (1958). Perceiving and Impressions. Philosophical Review 67 (April):226-236.
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  14.  12
    Frank K. Fair (1976). Two Problems with Roderick Chisholm's Perceiving. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (June):547-550.
  15.  14
    M. J. Baker (1954). Perceiving, Imagining, and Being Mistaken. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 14 (June):520-535.
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  16. Don Locke (1968). Perceiving and Thinking, Part I. Aristotelian Society 173:173-190.
     
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  17. Anthony M. Quinton (1968). Perceiving and Thinking, Part II. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 191:191-208.
     
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  18.  5
    John W. Yolton (1961). Thinking And Perceiving: A Study In The Philosophy Of Mind. Open Court.
  19.  39
    Christian Coseru (2012). Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    What turns the continuous flow of experience into perceptually distinct objects? Can our verbal descriptions unambiguously capture what it is like to see, hear, or feel? How might we reason about the testimony that perception alone discloses? Christian Coseru proposes a rigorous and highly original way to answer these questions by developing a framework for understanding perception as a mode of apprehension that is intentionally constituted, pragmatically oriented, and causally effective. By engaging with recent discussions in phenomenology and analytic philosophy (...)
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  20. Mitchell Green (2010). Perceiving Emotions. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 84 (1):45-61.
    I argue that it is possible literally to perceive the emotions of others. This account depends upon the possibility of perceiving a whole by perceiving one or more of its parts, and upon the view that emotions are complexes. After developing this account, I expound and reply to Rowland Stout's challenge to it. Stout is nevertheless sympathetic with the perceivability-of-emotions view. I thus scrutinize Stout's suggestion for a better defence of that view than I have provided, and offer (...)
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  21. Adrian Haddock (2011). The Disjunctive Conception of Perceiving. Philosophical Explorations 14 (1):23-42.
    John McDowell's conception of perceptual knowledge commits him to the claim that if I perceive that P then I am in a position to know that I perceive that P. In the first part of this essay, I present some reasons to be suspicious of this claim - reasons which derive from a general argument against 'luminosity' - and suggest that McDowell can reject this claim, while holding on to almost all of the rest of his conception of perceptual knowledge, (...)
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  22.  81
    John Turri (2010). Does Perceiving Entail Knowing? Theoria 76 (3):197-206.
    This article accomplishes two closely connected things. First, it refutes an influential view about the relationship between perception and knowledge. In particular, it demonstrates that perceiving does not entail knowing. Second, it leverages that refutation to demonstrate that knowledge is not the most general factive propositional attitude.
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  23. Robert Briscoe (2010). Perceiving the Present: Systematization of Illusions or Illusion of Systematization? Cognitive Science 34 (8):1530-1542.
    Mark Changizi et al. (2008) claim that it is possible systematically to organize more than 50 kinds of illusions in a 7 × 4 matrix of 28 classes. This systematization, they further maintain, can be explained by the operation of a single visual processing latency correction mechanism that they call “perceiving the present” (PTP). This brief report raises some concerns about the way a number of illusions are classified by the proposed systematization. It also poses two general problems—one empirical (...)
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  24.  83
    Casey O'Callaghan (2010). Perceiving the Locations of Sounds. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):123--140.
    Frequently, we learn of the locations of things and events in our environment by means of hearing. Hearing, I argue, is a locational mode of perceiving with a robustly spatial nature. I defend three proposals. First, audition furnishes information about the locations of things and events in one's environment because auditory experience itself is spatial. Audition represents space. Second, we hear the locations of things and events by or in hearing locational information about their sounds. Third, we auditorily experience (...)
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  25.  22
    John C. Trueswell & Anna Papafragou, Perceiving and Remembering Events Cross-Linguistically: Evidence From Dual-Task Paradigms.
    What role does language play during attention allocation in perceiving and remembering events? We recorded adults‟ eye movements as they studied animated motion events for a later recognition task. We compared native speakers of two languages that use different means of expressing motion (Greek and English). In Experiment 1, eye movements revealed that, when event encoding was made difficult by requiring a concurrent task that did not involve language (tapping), participants spent extra time studying what their language treats as (...)
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  26.  24
    Ryan West & Adam C. Pelser (2015). Perceiving God Through Natural Beauty. Faith and Philosophy 32 (3):293-312.
    In Perceiving God, William Alston briefly suggests the possibility of perceiving God indirectly through the perception of another object. Following recent work by C. Stephen Evans, we argue that Thomas Reid’s notion of “natural signs” helpfully illuminates how people can perceive God indirectly through natural beauty. First, we explain how some natural signs enable what Alston labels “indirect perception.” Second, we explore how certain emotions make it possible to see both beauty and the excellence of the minds behind (...)
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  27.  15
    Liliana Albertazzi (2012). Qualitative Perceiving. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (11-12):11-12.
    It is difficult to find agreement on what constitutes perceiving.at Rovereto, Italy. The term is used in a wide array of domains ranging from psychology to physiology to aesthetics, and over time it has also acquired diverse connotations within various disciplines. Current perceptual science, however, even when it deals with qualitative aspects of experience, for example phenomena of lightness and colour, almost exclusively explains them in terms of primary qualities or stimuli quantitatively understood. The fact that science treats qualitative (...)
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  28. Felicity Aulino (2014). Perceiving the Social Body. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (3):415-441.
    This essay develops the concept of the “social body” as a metaphorical representation of hierarchical relationships in Thailand, as well as the physical embodiment of social, religious, and political structures. To do so, I trace the symbolic coordinates of groups that correspond to conceptions of individual bodies, along with the habituated means of perceiving as part of a collective. I argue that conventional Thai social interactions involve active attention to and care of the “social body,” in which differential roles (...)
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  29.  41
    Casey O'Callaghan (2010). Perceiving the Locations of Sounds. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):123-140.
    Frequently, we learn of the locations of things and events in our environment by means of hearing. Hearing, I argue, is a locational mode of perceiving with a robustly spatial phenomenology. I defend three proposals. First, audition furnishes one with information about the locations of things and happenings in one’s environment because auditory experience itself has spatial content—auditory experience involves awareness of space. Second, we hear the locations of things and events by or in hearing the locations of their (...)
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  30.  45
    Theodor Ebert (1983). Aristotle on What Is Done in Perceiving. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 37 (2):181 - 198.
    The paper discusses the active part in the process of perceiving, usually expressed by the Greek word krinein. It is argued that krinein in one of its uses means "to judge" in the sense of judging a case, i. e. deciding it. It is not used for making statements. A second meaning of the Greek word is that of discerning or discriminating, and it is this meaning that plays a central part in Aristotle's theory of perception.
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  31.  73
    John Turri (2008). Practical and Epistemic Justification in Alston's Perceiving God. Faith and Philosophy 25 (3):290 - 299.
    This paper clarifies and evaluates a premise of William Alston’s argument in Perceiving God. The premise in question: if it is practically rational to engage in a doxastic practice, then it is epistemically rational to suppose that said practice is reliable. I first provide the background needed to understand how this premise fits into Alston’s main argument. I then present Alston’s main argument, and proceed to clarify, criticize, modify, and ultimately reject Alston’s argument for the premise in question. Without (...)
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  32.  14
    R. Clark (1981). Sensing, Perceiving, Thinking. Grazer Philosophische Studien 12:273-95.
    This paper is concerned with Chisholm's "adverbial theory of sensing". An attempt is made to give a literal statement of what it means "to sense redly" which is consistent with what Chisholm says about sensing and also meets various objections to adverbial theories. The paper concludes with a brief consideration of why it is that Chisholm does not offer an adverbial theory of perceiving, or of thinking in general, as well as of sensing.
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  33.  11
    Amit Chaturvedi (2014). Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy by Christian Coseru (Review). Philosophy East and West 64 (2):506-513.
    In Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy, Christian Coseru makes the innovative and ambitious argument that the project of Indian Buddhist epistemology, as represented by thinkers in the Yogācāra tradition of Dignāga and Dharmakīrti, is continuous in many of its methods and conclusions with the phenomenological theories of Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, as well as with recent naturalistic approaches in epistemology and the philosophy of mind. In Coseru’s reading, Buddhism shares with phenomenology the (...)
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  34.  4
    Carrie Doehring, Ann Clarke, Kenneth I. Pargament, Alice Hayes, Dean Hammer, Markos Nickolas & Patricia Hughes (2009). Perceiving Sacredness in Life: Correlates and Predictors. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 31 (1):55-73.
    Building on research demonstrating relationships between well being and perceptions of aspects of life as sacred, this study describes the rationale for and development of a scale measuring perceiving sacredness in life. It then explores associations between perceptions of sacredness in life and these four domains: religious/spiritual , personal , social , and situational . Participants responded to a mailing to a national random sample within the United States, completing 16 scales pertaining to the religious/spiritual, personal, social, and situational (...)
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  35.  22
    Richard Gale (1994). The Overall Argument of Alston's "Perceiving God". Religious Studies 30 (2):135 - 149.
    Alston's overall aim in Perceiving God is to show that we are rationally justified in believing that our apparent direct perceptions of God's presence are reliable and thus for the most part veridical, the objective, existentially-committed beliefs based on these experiences thereby being prima facie justified, subject to defeat by certain overriders supplied by some background religion. It is argued that our rational justification for believing this is of both an epistemic and pragmatic sort, in which an epistemic reason (...)
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  36.  13
    Peter Byrne (2000). Perceiving God and Realism. Philo 3 (2):74-88.
    The paper aims to move the debate between Alston and critics of Perceiving God forward by asking if Alston’s book establishes a case for a realist interpretation of Christian mystical perception. It is argued that critical comments on Alston’s paper in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research by Richard Gale point, when reinterpreted, to a crucial disparity between mystical perception and sense perception. A realist interpretation of the former is not prima facie warranted but a realist interpretation of the latter is. (...)
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  37.  4
    Ann Clarke, Alice Hayes, Patricia Hughes, Markos Nickolas, Carrie Doehring, Dean Hammer & Kenneth Pargament (2009). Perceiving Sacredness in Life: Correlates and Predictors. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 31 (1):55-73.
    Building on research demonstrating relationships between well being and perceptions of aspects of life as sacred, this study describes the rationale for and development of a scale measuring perceiving sacredness in life. It then explores associations between perceptions of sacredness in life and these four domains: religious/spiritual , personal , social , and situational . Participants responded to a mailing to a national random sample within the United States, completing 16 scales pertaining to the religious/spiritual, personal, social, and situational (...)
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  38. Josep Call (2000). Intending and Perceiving. In Leonard Katz (ed.), Journal of Consciousness Studies. Imprint Academic 1--34.
    Flack and de Waal argue that reciprocity, revenge, and moralistic aggression are important components of the social norms that exist in some non-human primates. These and other phenomena are seen as the evolutionary building blocks of human morality. Although focussing on these phenomena is a good starting point for studying the question of morality in non-human animals, they only provide a partial answer. Two other issues deserve careful attention: perception of intentions, and the distinction between using and perceiving social (...)
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  39. Maarten Coëgnarts & Peter Kravanja (2016). Perceiving Causality in Character Perception: A Metaphorical Study of Causation in Film. Metaphor and Symbol 31 (2):91-107.
    ABSTRACTThis article aims to show how the metaphorical and metonymical portrayal of character perception in film can give rise to two distinct but interrelated percepts of causality in the viewer, namely the percept that the viewer sees that an object perceived by a character causes the character’s perception of that object and the percept that the viewer sees that character perception in turn causes a change of state in the perceiving character’s mind. We start our discussion with a brief (...)
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  40. Christian Coseru (2015). Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy. OUP Usa.
    Perceiving Reality examines the epistemic function of perception and the relation between language and conceptual thought, and provides new ways of conceptualizing the Buddhist defense of the reflexivity thesis of consciousness.
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  41.  61
    Bence Nanay (ed.) (2010). Perceiving the World. Oxford University Press.
    'Perceiving the World' offers 11 essays written especially for this book by some of the leading contemporary philosophers of perception: Susanna Siegel, Jesse ...
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  42. Dustin Stokes (2012). Perceiving and Desiring: A New Look at the Cognitive Penetrability of Experience. Philosophical Studies 158 (3):479-92.
    This paper considers an orectic penetration hypothesis which says that desires and desire-like states may influence perceptual experience in a non-externally mediated way. This hypothesis is clarified with a definition, which serves further to distinguish the interesting target phenomenon from trivial and non-genuine instances of desire-influenced perception. Orectic penetration is an interesting possible case of the cognitive penetrability of perceptual experience. The orectic penetration hypothesis is thus incompatible with the more common thesis that perception is cognitively impenetrable. It is of (...)
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  43. William P. Alston (1991). Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction i. Character of the Book The central thesis of this book is that experiential awareness of God, or as I shall be saying, the perception of God, ...
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  44.  53
    Michael T. Turvey, R. E. Shaw, Edward S. Reed & William M. Mace (1981). Ecological Laws of Perceiving and Acting: In Reply to Fodor and Pylyshyn. Cognition 9 (3):237-304.
  45.  16
    Peter Carruthers (2015). Perceiving Mental States. Consciousness and Cognition 36:498-507.
  46. Ian Phillips (2010). Perceiving Temporal Properties. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):176-202.
    Philosophers have long struggled to understand our perceptual experience of temporal properties such as succession, persistence and change. Indeed, strikingly, a number have felt compelled to deny that we enjoy such experience. Philosophical puzzlement arises as a consequence of assuming that, if one experiences succession or temporal structure at all, then one experiences it at a moment. The two leading types of theory of temporal awareness—specious present theories and memory theories—are best understood as attempts to explain how temporal awareness is (...)
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  47.  27
    Chad Engelland (2016). Perceiving Other Animate Minds in Augustine. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 90 (1):25-48.
    This paper dispels the Cartesian reading of Augustine’s treatment of mind and other minds by examining key passages from De Trinitate and De Civitate Dei. While Augustine does vigorously argue that mind is indubitable and immaterial, he disavows the fundamental thesis of the dualistic tradition: the separation of invisible spirit and visible body. The immediate self-awareness of mind includes awareness of life, that is, of animating a body. Each of us animates our own body; seeing other animated bodies enables us (...)
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  48.  3
    Pe Griffiths & Rd Gray (1994). Vision and Power, John Hyman the Causal Analysis of Perceiving Misrepresents the Senses as Natural Powers. Although the Senses Are Not Voluntary Powers, the Concept of an Opportunity to See, Hear, and so Forth, is an Essential Part of the Concept of a Sense.(Hence the Concept of an Opportunity is Not Coincident with the Con). [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 91 (5).
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  49.  10
    Yaoda Xu & Marvin M. Chun (2009). Selecting and Perceiving Multiple Visual Objects. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (4):167-174.
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  50. Bence Nanay (2012). Perceiving Tropes. Erkenntnis 77 (1):1-14.
    There are two very different ways of thinking about perception. According to the first one, perception is representational: it represents the world as being a certain way. According to the second, perception is a genuine relation between the perceiver and a token object. These two views are thought to be incompatible. My aim is to work out the least problematic version of the representational view of perception that preserves the most important considerations in favor of the relational view. According to (...)
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