Search results for 'Percept' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. S. V. Mcdaniel (1963). A Note on the Percept Theory. Mind 72 (July):409-413.score: 21.0
  2. Roderick Firth (1949). Sense-Data and the Percept Theory, Part I. Mind 58 (October):434-465.score: 21.0
     
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  3. Roderick Firth (1950). Sense-Data and the Percept Theory, Part II. Mind 59 (January):35-56.score: 21.0
     
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  4. Jeffrey E. Foss (1988). The Percept and Vector Function Theories of the Brain. Philosophy of Science 55 (December):511-537.score: 20.0
    Physicalism is an empirical theory of the mind and its place in nature. So the physicalist must show that current neuroscience does not falsify physicalism, but instead supports it. Current neuroscience shows that a nervous system is what I call a vector function system. I provide a brief outline of the resources that empirical research has made available within the constraints of the vector function approach. Then I argue that these resources are sufficient, indeed apt, for the physicalist enterprise, by (...)
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  5. Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Tony Ro, Haluk Ögmen & Steven Todd (2007). Unconscious, Stimulus-Dependent Priming and Conscious, Percept-Dependent Priming with Chromatic Stimuli. Perception and Psychophysics 69 (4):550-557.score: 18.0
     
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  6. Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Tony Ro & Neel S. Singhal (2004). Unconscious Color Priming Occurs at Stimulus- Not Percept-Dependent Levels of Processing. Psychological Science 15 (3):198-202.score: 17.0
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  7. M. O. Ernst & H. H. Bülthoff (2004). Merging the Senses Into a Robust Percept. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):162-169.score: 17.0
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  8. Gerald M. Murch (1969). Growth of a Percept as a Function of Interstimulus Interval. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (1p1):121.score: 17.0
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  9. J. Beeckmans (2004). Chromatically Rich Phenomenal Percepts. Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):27-44.score: 12.0
    Visual percepts frequently appear chromatically rich, yet their paucity in reportable information has led to widely accepted minimalist models of vision. The discrepancy may be resolved by positing that the richness of natural scenes is reflected in phenomenal consciousness but not in detail in the phenomenal judgments upon which reports about qualia are based. Conceptual awareness (including phenomenal judgments) arises from neural mechanisms that categorize objects, and also from mechanisms that conceptually characterize textural properties of pre-categorically segmented regions in the (...)
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  10. Hermann Burchard (2011). The Role of Conscious Attention in Perception. Foundations of Science 16 (1):67-99.score: 11.0
    Impressions, energy radiated by phenomena in the momentary environmental scene, enter sensory neurons, creating in afferent nerves a data stream. Following Kant, by our inner sense the mind perceives its own thoughts as it ties together sense data into an internalized scene. The mind, residing in the brain, logically a Language Machine, processes and stores items as coded grammatical entities. Kantian synthetic unity in the linguistic brain is able to deliver our experience of the scene as we appear to see (...)
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  11. David Lewis (1966). Percepts and Color Mosaics in Visual Experience. Philosophical Review 75 (July):357-368.score: 11.0
  12. David A. Givner (1982). Concepts, Percepts and Perceptal Systems: The Relevance of Psychology to Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 13 (July-October):209-216.score: 11.0
  13. John O. Wisdom (1949). Perception-Statements. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 49:47-64.score: 11.0
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  14. Robert J. Richman (1958). The Whereabouts of Percepts. Journal of Philosophy 55 (April):344-347.score: 11.0
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  15. Leslie A. Paul (1961). Persons And Perception. Faber & Faber.score: 11.0
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  16. Roderick Firth (1949). Sense-Data and the Percept Theory. Mind 58 (232):434-465.score: 10.0
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  17. Roderick Firth (1950). Sense-Data and the Percept Theory. Mind 59 (233):35-56.score: 10.0
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  18. Aaron Wilson (2012). The Perception of Generals. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (2):169-190.score: 10.0
    In this paper I argue that, according to Peirce’s mature account of perception, we directly perceive generals, or "Thirds," in external reality which should be described as physical and not as mental. I argue against three other interpretations of the role of Thirdness in Peirce’s account: (I) we do not directly perceive Thirds, although they are involved in the interpretive and judgmental part of perception; (II) we directly perceive Thirds, but they are imposed on external objects by our minds; and (...)
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  19. Joerg Fingerhut (2011). Sensorimotor Signature, Skill, and Synaesthesia. Two Challenges for Enactive Theories of Perception. In Synaesthesia and Kinaesthetics. Habitus in Habitat III. Peter Lang.score: 10.0
    The condition of ‘genuine perceptual synaesthesia’ has been a focus of attention in research in psychology and neuroscience over the last decades. For subjects in this condition stimulation in one modality automatically and consistently over the subject’s lifespan triggers a percept in another modality. In hearing→colour synaesthesia, for example, a specific sound experience evokes a perception of a specific colour. In this paper, I discuss questions and challenges that the phenomenon of synaesthetic experience raises for theories of perceptual experience (...)
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  20. Franklin F. Wolff (1939). Concept, Percept, and Reality. Philosophical Review 48 (4):398-414.score: 10.0
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  21. Walter B. Pitkin (1913). Time and the Percept. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 10 (12):309-319.score: 10.0
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  22. Gwendolyn E. Roberson, Mark T. Wallace & James A. Schirillo (2001). The Sensorimotor Contingency of Multisensory Localization Correlates with the Conscious Percept of Spatial Unity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1001-1002.score: 10.0
    Two cross-modal experiments provide partial support for O'Regan & Noë's (O&N's) claim that sensorimotor contingencies mediate perception. Differences in locating a target sound accompanied by a spatially disparate neutral light correlate with whether the two stimuli were perceived as spatially unified. This correlation suggests that internal representations are necessary for conscious perception, which may also mediate sensorimotor contingencies.
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  23. Inge-Bert Täljedal (forthcoming). Esse Est Percipi and Percept Identity in C. J. Boström's Philosophy in Advance. Idealistic Studies.score: 10.0
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  24. George Stuart Fullerton (1913). Percept and Object in Common Sense and in Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 10 (3):57-64.score: 10.0
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  25. George Stuart Fullerton (1913). Percept and Object in Common Sense and in Philosophy. II. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 10 (6):149-158.score: 10.0
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  26. Anna Stone & Tim Valentine (2005). Strength of Visual Percept Generated by Famous Faces Perceived Without Awareness: Effects of Affective Valence, Response Latency, and Visual Field☆. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):548-564.score: 10.0
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  27. Colin Gardner (2012). Beyond Percept and Affect: Beckett's Film and Non-Human Becoming. Deleuze Studies 6 (4):589-600.score: 10.0
    Film, Samuel Beckett's 1964 short starring Buster Keaton, dubbed by Deleuze as ‘The Greatest Irish Film’, is a seminal text in the latter's cinematic canon as it helps us to extrapolate the transition from the Bergson-based movement-image of Cinema 1 to the Nietzschean time-image of Cinema 2. Film is unique insofar as its narrative traverses and progressively destroys the action-, perception- and affection-images that constitute the movement-image as a whole, using Keaton's body, and more importantly his face, as a means (...)
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  28. Antinori Anna, Smillie Luke, Smith Philip & Carter Olivia (2013). Effects of the Mood Induction Paradigm on the Binocular Rivalry Mix Percept. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 10.0
  29. Yves Citton (2007). Le percept noise comme registre du sensible. Multitudes 1 (1):137-146.score: 10.0
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  30. Richard Shiff (2013). Watch Out for Thinking (Even Fuzzy Thinking) Concept and Percept in Modern Art. Common Knowledge 19 (1):65-87.score: 10.0
    This article, a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur,” documents how some modern artists and critics have argued against any sort of verbal thinking about art. Beyond describing works of visual art and pronouncing on their relative quality, critics often assume responsibility for explaining what a given work means. Because paintings and sculptures are less precisely codified, less articulate, than verbalized communications, they may seem to require verbal translation. Yet some artists and critics (...)
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  31. George Stuart Fullerton (1913). Percept and Object in Common Sense and in Philosophy. II. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 10 (6):149-158.score: 10.0
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  32. S.�Verac Cauquil Alexandra, Rosito Maxime, Loubet Marissa & Celebrini Simona (2013). Peripheral Optic-Flow Involvement in the Multisensory Construction of the 3D Percept in Humans. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 10.0
  33. Carsten Allefeld, Peter Pütz, Kristina Kastner & Jiří Wackermann (2011). Flicker-Light Induced Visual Phenomena: Frequency Dependence and Specificity of Whole Percepts and Percept Features. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1344-1362.score: 10.0
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  34. Moustafa Bensafi, Christina Zelano, Brad Johnson, Joel Mainland, Rehan Khan & Noam Sobel (2004). 19 Olfaction: From Sniff to Percept. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press.score: 10.0
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  35. Mary B. Black (1977). Ojibwa Taxonomy and Percept Ambiguity. Ethos 5 (1):90-118.score: 10.0
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  36. Ralph N. Haber & Maurice Hershenson (1965). Effects of Repeated Brief Exposures on the Growth of a Percept. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (1):40.score: 10.0
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  37. C. L. Krumhansl (2000). Music Percept. 17, 151 (1999); CL Krumhansl Et Al. Cognition 75:13.score: 10.0
     
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  38. Robert Lane (2007). Peirception : Haack's Critical Common-Sensism About Perception. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books. 109-122.score: 10.0
    Susan Haack has argued that an account of perception based on that developed by Charles Peirce can overcome the false dichotomy between realist theories that downplay perception's interpretative character and irrealist theories that deny its directness. Haack believes that this dichotomy is overcome by Peirce's distinction between the perceptual judgment, the belief that accompanies a perceptual experience, and the percept, the phenomenal, interactive aspect of a perceptual experience. But I provide reasons for thinking that Haack's account of perception is (...)
     
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  39. G. E. Roberson, M. T. Wallace & J. A. Schirillo (2001). A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness-Open Peer Commentary-The Sensorimotor Contingency of Multisensory Localization Correlates with the Conscious Percept of Spatial Unity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1001-1001.score: 10.0
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  40. E. A. R. (1966). The Body Percept. Review of Metaphysics 20 (2):384-384.score: 10.0
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  41. George Stuart Fullerton (1913). Percept and Object in Common Sense and in Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 10 (3):57-64.score: 10.0
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  42. Mohan Matthen (2014). Active Perception and the Representation of Space. In Dustin Stokes, Mohan Matthen & Stephen Biggs (eds.), Perception and Its Modalities. Oxford University Press. 44-72.score: 9.0
    Kant argued that the perceptual representations of space and time were templates for the perceived spatiotemporal ordering of objects, and common to all modalities. His idea is that these perceptual representations were specific to no modality, but prior to all—they are pre-modal, so to speak. In this paper, it is argued that active perception—purposeful interactive exploration of the environment by the senses—demands premodal representations of time and space.
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  43. Casey O'Callaghan (forthcoming). Speech Perception. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford.score: 9.0
    Is speech special? This paper evaluates the evidence that speech perception is distinctive when compared with non-linguistic auditory perception. It addresses the phenomenology, contents, objects, and mechanisms involved in the perception of spoken language. According to the account it proposes, the capacity to perceive speech in a manner that enables understanding is an acquired perceptual skill. It involves learning to hear language-specific types of ethologically significant sounds. According to this account, the contents of perceptual experience when listening to familiar speech (...)
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  44. Mohan Matthen (forthcoming). Introduction to Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. In , Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
    Perception is the ultimate source of our knowledge about contingent facts. It is an extremely important philosophical development that starting in the last quarter of the twentieth century, philosophers have begun to change how they think of perception. The traditional view of perception focussed on sensory receptors; it has become clear, however, that perceptual systems radically transform the output of these receptors, yielding content concerning objects and events in the external world. Adequate understanding of this process requires that we think (...)
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  45. Susanna Schellenberg (2008). The Situation-Dependency of Perception. Journal of Philosophy 105 (2):55-84.score: 8.0
    I argue that perception is necessarily situation-dependent. The way an object is must not just be distinguished from the way it appears and the way it is represented, but also from the way it is presented given the situational features. First, I argue that the way an object is presented is best understood in terms of external, mind-independent, but situation-dependent properties of objects. Situation-dependent properties are exclusively sensitive to and ontologically dependent on the intrinsic properties of objects, such as their (...)
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  46. Susanna Schellenberg (2007). Action and Self-Location in Perception. Mind 115 (463):603-632.score: 8.0
    I offer an explanation of how subjects are able to perceive the intrinsic spatial properties of objects, given that subjects always perceive from a particular location. The argument proceeds in two steps. First, I argue that a conception of space is necessary to perceive the intrinsic spatial properties of objects. This conception of space is spelled out by showing that perceiving intrinsic properties requires perceiving objects as the kind of things that are perceivable from other locations. Second, I show that (...)
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  47. Hanne De Jaegher (2009). Social Understanding Through Direct Perception? Yes, by Interacting. Consciousness & Cognition 18 (2):535-542.score: 8.0
    This paper comments on Gallagher’s recently published direct perception proposal about social cognition [Gallagher, S. (2008a). Direct perception in the intersubjective context. Consciousness and Cognition, 17(2), 535–543]. I show that direct perception is in danger of being appropriated by the very cognitivist accounts criticised by Gallagher (theory theory and simulation theory). Then I argue that the experiential directness of perception in social situations can be understood only in the context of the role of the interaction process in social cognition. I (...)
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  48. Jack Lyons (2011). Circularity, Reliability, and the Cognitive Penetrability of Perception. Philosophical Issues 21 (1):289-311.score: 8.0
    Is perception cognitively penetrable, and what are the epistemological consequences if it is? I address the latter of these two questions, partly by reference to recent work by Athanassios Raftopoulos and Susanna Seigel. Against the usual, circularity, readings of cognitive penetrability, I argue that cognitive penetration can be epistemically virtuous, when---and only when---it increases the reliability of perception.
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  49. Mark Eli Kalderon, Form Without Matter, Empedocles and Aristotle on Color Perception.score: 8.0
    Aristotle’s definition in De Anima of perception as the assimilation of sensible form without the matter of the perceived object is notoriously difficult to interpret. The present essay provides a novel interpretation of Aristotle’s definition by reading it in light of a puzzle about sensory presentation to be found in the work of Empedocles. Empedocles held a general conception of sensory awareness for which ingestion provides the model. In order for something to be perceived it must be taken within so (...)
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  50. Susanna Siegel (forthcoming). Affordances and the Contents of Perception. In Berit Brogaard (ed.), Does Perception Have Content?score: 8.0
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