Search results for 'Perception (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mohan Matthen (2015). Introduction to Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. In Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press 1-25.
    Perception is the ultimate source of our knowledge about contingent facts. It is an extremely important philosophical development that starting in the last quarter of the twentieth century, philosophers have begun to change how they think of perception. The traditional view of perception focussed on sensory receptors; it has become clear, however, that perceptual systems radically transform the output of these receptors, yielding content concerning objects and events in the external world. Adequate understanding of this process requires (...)
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  2. Bence Nanay (forthcoming). Philosophy of Perception: A Road-Map with Many Bypass Roads. In Current Controversies in Philosophy of Perception. Routlegde
    An introduction to contemporary debates in philosophy of perception.
     
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  3.  51
    Gary C. Hatfield (2009). Perception and Cognition: Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Representation and content in some (actual) theories of perception -- Representation in perception and cognition : task analysis, psychological functions, and rule instantiation -- Perception as unconscious inference -- Representation and constraints : the inverse problem and the structure of visual space -- On perceptual constancy -- Getting objects for free (or not) : the philosophy and psychology of object perception -- Color perception and neural encoding : does metameric matching entail a loss of information? (...)
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  4.  24
    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc (2010). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Merleau-Ponty and Phenomenology of Perception. Routledge.
    In this GuideBookKomarine Romdenh-Romluc introduces and assesses: Merleau-Ponty's life and the background to his philosophy the key themes and arguments of Phenomenology of Perception the continuing importance of Merleau-Ponty's work to ...
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  5.  64
    Simo Knuuttila & Pekka Kärkkäinen (eds.) (2008). Theories of Perception in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Springer.
    In recent years, the rich tradition of various philosophical theories of perception has been increasingly studied by scholars of the history of philosophy of ...
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  6.  55
    Athanassios Raftopoulos (2009). Cognition and Perception: How Do Psychology and Neural Science Inform Philosophy? MIT Press.
    An argument that there are perceptual mechanisms that retrieve information in cognitively and conceptually unmediated ways and that this sheds light on various ...
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  7. Bence Nanay (2014). Philosophy of Perception as a Guide to Aesthetics. In Greg Currie, Aaron Meskin, Matthew Kieran & Jon Robson (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences of the Mind.
    The aim of this paper is to argue that it is a promising avenue of research to consider philosophy of perception to be a guide to aesthetics. More precisely, my claim is that many, maybe even most, traditional problems in aesthetics are in fact about philosophy of perception that can, as a result, be fruitfully addressed with the help of the conceptual apparatus of philosophy of perception. This claim may sound provocative, but after qualifying what I mean (...)
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  8. William Fish (2010). Philosophy of Perception: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.
    Introduction: Three key principles -- Sense datum theories -- Adverbial theories -- Belief acquisition theories -- Intentional theories -- Disjunctive theories -- Perception and causation -- Perception and the sciences of the mind -- Perception and other sense modalities.
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  9. Ezio Di Nucci & Conor McHugh (eds.) (2006). Content, Consciousness, and Perception: Essays in Contemporary Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge Scholars Press.
    What sort of thing is the mind? And how can such a thing at the same time - belong to the natural world, - represent the world, - give rise to our subjective experience, - and ground human knowledge? Content, Consciousness and Perception is an edited collection, comprising eleven new contributions to the philosophy of mind, written by some of the most promising young philosophers in the UK and Ireland. The book is arranged into three parts. Part I, Concepts (...)
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  10. Peter K. Machamer & Robert G. Turnbull (1978). Studies in Perception Interrelations in the History of Philosophy and Science.
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  11. Alva Noë (2008). Précis of Action in Perception: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):660–665.
    The main idea of this book is that perceiving is a way of acting. Perception is not something that happens to us, or in us. It is something we do. Think of a blind person taptapping his or her way around a cluttered space, perceiving that space by touch, not all at once, but through time, by skillful probing and movement. This is, or at least ought to be, our paradigm of what perceiving is. The world makes itself available (...)
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  12.  43
    D. W. Hamlyn (1983). Perception, Learning, and the Self: Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge & K. Paul.
    INTRODUCTION If there is one underlying implication in the following essays it is the inadequacy of the information-processing model for cognitive ...
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  13. Christian Coseru (forthcoming). “Buddhist ‘Foundationalism’ and the Phenomenology of Perception,” Philosophy East and West 59:4 (October 2009): 409-439. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West.
    In this essay, which draws on a set of interrelated issues in the phenomenology of perception, I call into question the assumption that Buddhist philosophers of the Dignāga-Dharmakīrti tradition pursue a kind of epistemic foundationalism. I argue that the embodied cognition paradigm, which informs recent efforts within the Western philosophical tradition to overcome the Cartesian legacy, can be also found– albeit in a modified form–in the Buddhist epistemological tradition. In seeking to ground epistemology in the phenomenology of cognition, the (...)
     
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  14.  3
    Michael J. Morgan (1977). Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch, and the Philosophy of Perception. Cambridge University Press.
  15. Steve Hagen (1995). How the World Can Be the Way It Is: An Inquiry for the New Millennium Into Science, Philosophy, and Perception. Quest Books.
     
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  16.  13
    Steve Hagen (2012). Why the World Doesn't Seem to Make Sense: An Inquiry Into Science, Philosophy, and Perception. Sentient Publications.
    Nobody knows what's going on -- Belief -- Knowledge -- Contradiction -- Certitude -- At ease with inconceivability -- Chaos -- Consciousness -- Immediacy -- What matters -- Inertia -- Becoming -- Totality.
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  17.  29
    Gary Hatfield (2015). Perception in Philosophy and Psychology in the 19th and Early 20th Centuries. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press 100–117.
    The chapter begins with a sketch of the empirical, theoretical, and philosophical background to nineteenth-century theories of perception, focusing on visual perception. It then considers German sensory physiology and psychology in the nineteenth century and its reception. This section gives special attention to: assumptions about nerve–sensation relations; spatial perception; the question of whether there is a two-dimensional representation in visual experience; psychophysics; size constancy; and theories of colour perception. The chapter then offers a brief look at (...)
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  18.  50
    Stephan Blatti (2009). Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 463-464.
    This is a review of Sara Heinämaa, Vili Lähteenmäki, Pauliina Remes (ed.), Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy (Dordrecht: Springer 2007).
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  19.  11
    Kenneth Hobson (2014). William Fish, Philosophy of Perception: A Contemporary Introduction. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 34 (1-2):56-58.
    The philosophy of perception has emerged in the past decade as a subfield in its own right and no longer merely as an episode in epistemology and philosophy of mind. In this book, William Fish provides us with a clearly written, informed, and accessible contemporary introduction to the philosophy of perception as well as an update on current debates within this field. The selection of topics is excellent and the attention devoted to each topic is always just about (...)
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  20.  16
    Margaret Macdonald (1953). Linguistic Philosophy and Perception. Philosophy 28 (October):311-324.
    Philosophical theories of perception are generally admitted to be responses to certain problems or puzzles allied to the ancient dichotomy between Appearance and Reality. For they have been mainly provoked by the incompatibility of the common–sense assumption that an external, physical world exists and is revealed to the senses with the well–known facts of perceptual variation and error. If only what is real were perceived just as if only what is right were done it is possible that many of (...)
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  21.  45
    Patrick A. Heelan (1983). Space-Perception And The Philosophy Of Science. University Of California Press.
    00 Drawing on the phenomenological tradition in the philosophy of science and philosophy of nature, Patrick Heelan concludes that perception is a cognitive, ...
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  22. Filip Mattens (2009). Perception, Body, and the Sense of Touch: Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Husserl Studies 25 (2):97-120.
    In recent philosophy of mind, a series of challenging ideas have appeared about the relation between the body and the sense of touch. In certain respects, these ideas have a striking affinity with Husserl’s theory of the constitution of the body. Nevertheless, these two approaches lead to very different understandings of the role of the body in perception. Either the body is characterized as a perceptual “organ,” or the body is said to function as a “template.” Despite its focus (...)
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  23.  41
    David J. Casarett (1999). Moral Perception and the Pursuit of Medical Philosophy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (2):125-139.
    This paper begins by examining the claim that the practice of medicine is essentially a moral endeavor. According to this view, all clinical practice has moral content, and each clinical situation has a moral dimension. I suggest that in order to recognize this moral dimension, clinicians must engage in an interpretive process, and that they must be able to interpret clinical data in ethical terms. However, clinicians often lack the ‘moral perception’ required to appreciate this moral dimension. I will (...)
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  24.  25
    Philipp Koralus (2016). Can Visual Cognitive Neuroscience Learn Anything From the Philosophy of Language? Ambiguity and the Topology of Neural Network Models of Multistable Perception. Synthese 193 (5):1409-1432.
    The Necker cube and the productive class of related stimuli involving multiple depth interpretations driven by corner-like line junctions are often taken to be ambiguous. This idea is normally taken to be as little in need of defense as the claim that the Necker cube gives rise to multiple distinct percepts. In the philosophy of language, it is taken to be a substantive question whether a stimulus that affords multiple interpretations is a case of ambiguity. If we take into account (...)
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  25. Stephen Mulhall (1987). Wittgenstein on Aspect-Perception and the Philosophy of Psychology. Dissertation, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. ;A detailed exegetical account of Wittgenstein's remarks on aspect-perception with respect to pictures and language shows that their key conclusions can be applied to the field of psychological concepts as well. Comparison with Davidson's philosophy of language and action reveals that the confusions against which Wittgenstein is fighting are central to contemporary analytic philosophy; comparison with Heidegger's system of thought reveals striking structural analogies with Wittgenstein's positive conclusions. (...)
     
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  26. Ryan Perkins (2012). Vagueness and the Philosophy of Perception. Dissertation, University of Oxford
    This dissertation explores several illuminating points of intersection between the philosophy of perception and the philosophy of vagueness. Among other things, I argue: (i) that it is entirely unhelpful to theorize about perception or consciousness using Nagelian "what it's like" talk; (ii) that a popular recent account of perceptual phenomenology (representationalism) conflicts with our best theory of vagueness (supervaluationism); (iii) that there are no vague properties, for Evans-esque reasons; (iv) that it is impossible to insert "determinacy" operators into (...)
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  27. J. R. Smythies (1993). The Impact of Contemporary Neuroscience and Introspection Psychology on the Philosophy of Perception. In Edmond Leo Wright (ed.), New Representationalisms: Essays in the Philosophy of Perception. Brookfield: Avebury 205--31.
  28.  8
    Brian L. Keeley (2015). Speculative Fiction and the Philosophy of Perception. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):169-181.
    After first noting that I seek to broaden the definition of science fiction to a little more loosely defined speculative fiction, this essay explores four different ways in which fiction can work together with both the sciences and the philosophy of perception. This cooperation is needed because there is much about the sensory worlds of humans and non-human animals of which we continue to be ignorant. First, speculative fiction can be a source of hypotheses about the nature of the (...)
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  29. Marjorie Grene (1970). Sense-Perception: Philosophy's Step-Child? In Erwin W. Straus & Richard Marion Griffith (eds.), Aisthesis and Aesthetics. Pittsburgh, Pa.,Duquesne University Press 13.
     
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  30.  75
    Gary Hatfield (2011). Philosophy of Perception and the Phenomenology of Visual Space. Philosophic Exchange 42:31-66.
    In the philosophy of perception, direct realism has come into vogue. Philosophical authors assert and assume that what their readers want, and what anyone should want, is some form of direct realism. There are disagreements over precisely what form this direct realism should take. The majority of positions in favor now offer a direct realism in which objects and their material or physical properties constitute the contents of perception, either because we have an immediate or intuitive acquaintance with (...)
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  31. Mohan Matthen (ed.) (2015). The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Perception has been for philosophers in the last few decades an area of compelling interest and intense investigation. Developments in contemporary cognitive science and neuroscience has thrown up new information about the brain and new conceptions of how sensory information is processed and used. These new conceptions offer philosophers opportunities for reconceptualising the senses--what they tell us, how we use them, and the nature of the knowledge they give us. Today, the philosophy of perception resonates with ideas that (...)
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  32. Gary Hatfield (2009). Getting Objects for Free (Or Not): The Philosophy and Psychology of Object Perception. In Perception and Cognition: Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology. Clarendon Press 212-255.
  33.  22
    Eric LaRock (2002). Against the Functionalist Reading of Aristotle's Philosophy of Perception and Emotion. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):231-258.
    Examining the literature on Aristotelian psychology can leave one with the impression that his theory of perception and emotion is credible primarily because it accords with contemporary functionalism, a physicalist theory that has achieved orthodoxy in contemporary philosophy of mind. In my view, squeezing Aristotle into a functionalist mold is a mistake, for functionalism entaiIs at least two theses that Aristotle would reject: (1) that material types make no essential difference to perception and emotion (and to mental states (...)
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  34.  3
    Elizabeth de Freitas (2014). How Theories of Perception Deploy the Line: Reconfiguring Students' Bodies Through Topo‐Philosophy. Educational Theory 64 (3):285-301.
    In this essay Elizabeth de Freitas follows Tim Ingold's groundbreaking anthropological work on lines and their cultural and material significance to argue that the line is the engine of theory, be it the drawn line of inscription or mathematical measure, the exclusionary line of delineation, or the undulating generative line of flight. De Freitas focuses on contemporary theories of perception that deploy the line — and mobilize the force of theory — so as to encode and reconfigure the student's (...)
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  35. William Cobb & James M. Edie (eds.) (1964). The Primacy of Perception: And Other Essays on Phenomenological Psychology, the Philosophy of Art, History and Politics. Northwestern University Press.
    _The Primacy of Perception_ brings together a number of important studies by Maurice Merleau-Ponty that appeared in various publications from 1947 to 1961. The title essay, which is in essence a presentation of the underlying thesis of his _Phenomenology of Perception,_ is followed by two courses given by Merleau-Ponty at the Sorbonne on phenomenological psychology. "Eye and Mind" and the concluding chapters present applications of Merleau-Ponty's ideas to the realms of art, philosophy of history, and politics. Taken together, the (...)
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  36. Patrick A. Heelan (1989). Space-Perception and the Philosophy of Science. University of California Press.
    Drawing on the phenomenological tradition in the philosophy of science and philosophy of nature, Patrick Heelan concludes that perception is a cognitive, world-building act, and is therefore never absolute or finished.
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  37. Bence Nanay (2016). Current Controversies in Philosophy of Perception. Routledge.
    This book provides an up-to-date and accessible overview of the hottest and most influential contemporary debates in philosophy of perception, written especially for this volume by many of the most important philosophers of the field. The book addresses the following key questions: Can perception be unconscious? What is the relation between perception and attention? What properties can we perceive? Are perceptual states representations? How is vision different from the other sense modalities? How do these sense modalities interact (...)
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  38. Komarine Romdenh-Romluc (2010). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Merleau-Ponty and Phenomenology of Perception. Routledge.
    Maurice Merleau-Ponty is hailed as one of the key philosophers of the twentieth century. _Phenomenology of Perception_ is his most famous and influential work, and an essential text for anyone seeking to understand phenomenology. In this _GuideBook_ Komarine Romdenh-Romluc introduces and assesses: Merleau-Ponty’s life and the background to his philosophy the key themes and arguments of _Phenomenology of Perception_ the continuing importance of Merleau-Ponty’s work to philosophy. _Merleau-Ponty and Phenomenology of Perception_ is an ideal starting point for anyone coming to (...)
     
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  39. Marcus Willaschek (ed.) (2012). Disjunctivism: Disjunctive Accounts in Epistemology and in the Philosophy of Perception. Routledge.
    Does perception provide us with direct and unmediated access to the world around us? The so-called 'argument from illusion ' has traditionally been supposed to show otherwise: from the subject's point of view, perceptual illusions are often indistinguishable from veridical perceptions; hence, perceptual experience, as such, cannot provide us with knowledge of the world, but only with knowledge of how things appear to us. Disjunctive accounts of perceptual experience, first proposed by John McDowell and Paul Snowdon in the early (...)
     
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  40. Marcus Willaschek (ed.) (2012). Disjunctivism: Disjunctive Accounts in Epistemology and in the Philosophy of Perception. Routledge.
    Does perception provide us with direct and unmediated access to the world around us? The so-called 'argument from illusion ' has traditionally been supposed to show otherwise: from the subject's point of view, perceptual illusions are often indistinguishable from veridical perceptions; hence, perceptual experience, as such, cannot provide us with knowledge of the world, but only with knowledge of how things appear to us. Disjunctive accounts of perceptual experience, first proposed by John McDowell and Paul Snowdon in the early (...)
     
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  41.  46
    Qing Tian (2008). Perception of Business Bribery in China: The Impact of Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):437 - 445.
    This paper examines the impact of Chinese business managers’ moral philosophies on the perception of corrupt payments such as bribery, kickbacks and gift giving. Business managers from Mainland China were selected as target respondents. As hypothesized the survey results generally indicate that moral relativism is a significant predictor of Chinese business managers’ favorable perception of bribery and kickbacks. In examining the attitude toward gift giving, the survey showed that an individual’s attitude toward gift giving was neither affected by (...)
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  42.  11
    A. Noe & E. Thompson (eds.) (2002). Vision and Mind: Selected Readings in the Philosophy of Perception. MIT Press.
    A collection of works, many of them classics, on the orthodox view of visual perception.
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  43. Casey O'Callaghan (2009). Introduction: The Philosophy of Sounds and Auditory Perception. In Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.), Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press
  44. William C. Fish (2004). The Direct/Indirect Distinction in Contemporary Philosophy of Perception. Essays in Philosophy 5 (1):1-13.
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  45.  29
    Dustin Stokes (2016). Review of Bence Nanay-Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 8:00.
  46.  13
    Arnold Koslow (1969). Philosophy, Science, and Sense Perception: Historical and Critical Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 66 (2):43-58.
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  47.  14
    Bruce W. Brotherston (1943). Sensuous and Non-Sensuous Perception in Empirical Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy 40 (22):589-597.
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  48.  2
    Jeffrey A. Mason (1999). The Philosopher's Address: Writing and the Perception of Philosophy. Lexington Books.
    Jeffrey A. Mason has written an informative, accessible guide to today's most popular form of philosophical writing, the journal-length essay. The Philosopher's Address does what no other book on the market has attempted: it takes the reader behind the scenes of the writing process to expose the rhetorical underpinnings of philosophical texts. Mason argues that readers need to understand why philosophical writing is constructed as it is, and to be aware of the rhetorical devices by which authors seek to persuade (...)
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  49. Mark Pastin (1983). Philosophy of Perception. In Contemporary Philosophy: A New Survey. Nijhoff
     
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  50. Paul Frederic Schmidt (1967). Perception and Cosmology in Whitehead's Philosophy. New Brunswick, N.J.,Rutgers University Press.
     
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