Search results for 'Percy Simpson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Percy Simpson (1922). Late Beginners in Greek. The Classical Review 36 (5-6):99-100.score: 240.0
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  2. Percy Simpson (1922). Seneca and Elizabethan Tragedy Seneca and Elizabethan Tragedy. By F. L. Lucas. One Vol. Octavo. Pp. 133. Cambridge: University Press, 1922. 7s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 36 (7-8):180-181.score: 240.0
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  3. Lorenzo C. Simpson (2007). Special Section: Lorenzo Simpson's the Unfinished Project : Cosmopolitanism, Humanism and Meaning: A Reply to My Readers. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (3):319-341.score: 180.0
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  4. William F. Buckley, Eudora Welty & Walker Percy (2009). Eudora Welty & Walker Percy. The Chesterton Review 35 (1-2):333-357.score: 180.0
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  5. Tom Simpson (2010). Response From Simpson. BioScience 60 (4):257-257.score: 180.0
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  6. Robert Gooding-Williams, Robert Bernasconi, Kenneth Baynes, David M. Rasmussen & Lorenzo C. Simpson (2007). Special Sectio Lorenzo Simpson's the Unfinished Project: Toward a Postmetaphysical Humanism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (3).score: 180.0
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  7. Kurt Gödel, Solomon Feferman, Charles Parsons & Stephen G. Simpson (eds.) (2010). Kurt Gödel: Essays for His Centennial. Association for Symbolic Logic.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. General: 1. The Gödel editorial project: a synopsis Solomon Feferman; 2. Future tasks for Gödel scholars John W. Dawson, Jr., and Cheryl A. Dawson; Part II. Proof Theory: 3. Kurt Gödel and the metamathematical tradition Jeremy Avigad; 4. Only two letters: the correspondence between Herbrand and Gödel Wilfried Sieg; 5. Gödel's reformulation of Gentzen's first consistency proof for arithmetic: the no-counter-example interpretation W. W. Tait; 6. Gödel on intuition and on Hilbert's finitism W. W. (...)
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  8. Lorenzo Charles Simpson (1995). Technology, Time, and the Conversations of Modernity. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Technology, Time, and the Conversations of Modernity takes as its impetus the idea that technology is an embodiment of our uneasiness with finitude. Lorenzo Simpson arguest that technology has succeeded in granting our wish to domesticate time. He shows how this attitude affects our understanding of the meaning of action and our ability to discern meaning in our lives. Simpson addresses the question of the price exacted by modernity in its scientific and technological guises; at the same time, (...)
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  9. Lorenzo Charles Simpson (2001). The Unfinished Project: Towards a Postmetaphysical Humanism. Routledge.score: 60.0
    As humanity becomes increasingly interconnected through globalization, the question of whether community is possible within culturally diverse societies has returned as a principal concern for contemporary thought. Lorenzo Simpson charges that the current discussion is stuck at an impasse-between postmodernism's fragmented notions of cultural difference and humanism's homogeneous versions of community. Simpson proposes an alternative-one that bridges cultural differences without erasing them. He argues that we must establish common aesthetic and ethical standards incorporating sensitivity to difference if we (...)
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  10. Stephen G. Simpson (1999). Subsystems of Second-Order Arithmetic. Springer-Verlag.score: 60.0
    Stephen George Simpson. with definition 1.2.3 and the discussion following it. For example, taking 90(n) to be the formula n §E Y, we have an instance of comprehension, VYEIXVn(n€X<—>n¢Y), asserting that for any given set Y there exists a ...
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  11. W. Gary Simpson & Theodor Kohers (2002). The Link Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance: Evidence From the Banking Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 35 (2):97 - 109.score: 30.0
    The purpose of this investigation is to extend earlier research on the relationship between corporate social and financial performance. The unique contribution of the study is the empirical analysis of a sample of companies from the banking industry and the use of Community Reinvestment Act ratings as a social performance measure. The empirical analysis solidly supports the hypothesis that the link between social and financial performance is positive.
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  12. Matthew Simpson (2006). A Paradox of Sovereignty in Rousseau's Social Contract. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (1):45-56.score: 30.0
    One unique part of Rousseau's Social Contract is his argument that a just society must have a specific constitutional arrangement of powers centred around what he calls the Sovereign and the Prince. This makes his philosophy different from other contractualists, such as Hobbes and Locke, who think that the principles of good government are compatible with any number of institutional structures. Rousseau's constitutional theory is thus significant in a way that has no parallel in Hobbes or Locke. More to the (...)
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  13. Brian P. Simpson (2009). Wealth and Income Inequality: An Economic and Ethical Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):525 - 538.score: 30.0
    I perform an economic and ethical analysis on wealth and income inequality. Economists have performed many statistical studies that reveal a number of, often contradictory, findings in connection with the distribution of wealth and income. Hence, the statistical findings leave us with no better knowledge of the effects that inequality has on economic progress. At the same time, the existing theoretical results have not provided us with a definitive answer concerning the effects of inequality on progress. By gaining knowledge of (...)
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  14. Robert Mark Simpson (2013). Epistemic Peerhood and the Epistemology of Disagreement. Philosophical Studies 164 (2):561-577.score: 30.0
    In disagreements about trivial matters, it often seems appropriate for disputing parties to adopt a ‘middle ground’ view about the disputed matter. But in disputes about more substantial controversies (e.g. in ethics, religion, or politics) this sort of doxastic conduct can seem viciously acquiescent. How should we distinguish between the two kinds of cases, and thereby account for our divergent intuitions about how we ought to respond to them? One possibility is to say that ceding ground in a trivial dispute (...)
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  15. David Simpson (2013). Wittgenstein and Stage-Setting: Being Brought Into the Space of Reasons. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45:1-16.score: 30.0
    Wittgenstein constantly invokes teaching, training and learning in his later work. It is therefore interesting to consider what role these notions play for him there. I argue that their use is central to Wittgenstein’s attempt to refute cognitivist assumptions, and to show how normative practices can be understood without the threat of circularity, grounded not in a kind of seeing, but in doing, and the natural reactions of an organism. This can generate a worry that Wittgenstein’s position is quietist and (...)
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  16. David Simpson (1992). Lying, Liars and Language. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (3):623-639.score: 30.0
  17. Henry W. Lane & Donald G. Simpson (1984). Bribery in International Business: Whose Problem is It? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 3 (1):35 - 42.score: 30.0
    Bribery is a frequently discussed problem in international business. This article looks at the problem from the North American and from the developing country perspective. It describes and analyses specific cases and highlights recurring patterns of behavior.The article is based on the experiences of the authors who have been promoting business in the developing world. In addition to ethical considerations involved with bribery there are some very practical reasons for not engaging in the practice. There are also real barriers to (...)
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  18. David Simpson (2008). Irony, Dissociation and the Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (6):119-135.score: 30.0
    Within the philosophy of language, irony is not a terribly popular topic. For the most part its status is that of a peripheral and derivative oddity, and when it has been discussed, it has tended to be as an aside to a discussion of its more popular purported cousin, metaphor. My major goal here is to help drag irony towards the centre of attention, in two ways. First, in the course of sorting through the account of verbal irony I want (...)
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  19. David Simpson (2007). Truth, Truthfulness and Philosophy in Plato and Nietzsche. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):339 – 360.score: 30.0
    Even those aware of Nietzsches ambivalent (rather than purely negative) attitude to Plato, tend to accept Nietzsches account of Plato and himself as occupying the poles of philosophy. Much that Nietzsche says supports this view, but we need not take him at his word. I consider Nietzsche and Plato on three planes: their view of truth, their view of philosophy, and their use of certain emblematic figures (the New Philosopher, the Philosopher King) as the bearers of philosophys future. On these (...)
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  20. Thomas Simpson (2011). Robots, Trust and War. Philosophy and Technology 24 (3):325-337.score: 30.0
    Putting robots on the battlefield is clearly appealing for policymakers. Why risk human lives, when robots could take our place, and do the dirty work of killing and dying for us? Against this, I argue that robots will be unable to win the kind of wars that we are increasingly drawn into. Modern warfare tends towards asymmetric conflict. Asymmetric warfare cannot be won without gaining the trust of the civilian population; this is ‘the hearts and minds’, in the hackneyed phrase (...)
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  21. Walker Percy (1958). Symbol, Consciousness, and Intersubjectivity. Journal of Philosophy 55 (15):631-641.score: 30.0
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  22. Evan Simpson (2013). Reasonable Trust. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):402-423.score: 30.0
    : Establishing trust among individual agents has defined a central issue of practical reasoning since the dawning of liberal individualism. Hobbes was convinced that foolish self-interest always threatens to defeat uncompelled cooperation when one can gain by abandoning a joint effort. Against this philosophical background, scientific studies of human beings display a surprisingly cooperative species. It would seem to follow that biologically inherited characteristics impair our reason. The response proposed here distinguishes rationality and reasonableness as two forms of good reasoning. (...)
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  23. Steve Awodey, Carsten Butz & Alex Simpson (2007). Relating First-Order Set Theories and Elementary Toposes. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 13 (3):340-358.score: 30.0
    We show how to interpret the language of first-order set theory in an elementary topos endowed with, as extra structure, a directed structural system of inclusions (dssi). As our main result, we obtain a complete axiomatization of the intuitionistic set theory validated by all such interpretations. Since every elementary topos is equivalent to one carrying a dssi, we thus obtain a first-order set theory whose associated categories of sets are exactly the elementary toposes. In addition, we show that the full (...)
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  24. Douglas J. Simpson (1997). Educational Reform: A Deweyan Perspective. Garland Pub..score: 30.0
    This book illuminates contemporary educational reform discussions regarding teacher education programs and pre-K-12 schools by providing a clear analysis and application of John Dewey's relevant educational writings and ideas. The volume addresses issues of how future teachers should be liberally educated as well as prepared to be professional educators. Pre-K-12 education is evaluated through a Deweyan lens, involving a discussion of such topics as the teacher's responsibilities, charter schools, a common curriculum, professional development schools, new curricula, school administration, and cooperative (...)
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  25. David Simpson (2003). Interpretation and Skill: On Passing Theory. In G. Preyer, G. Peter & M. Ulkan (eds.), Concepts of Meaning: Framing an Integrated theory of Linguistic Behavior. Kluwer.score: 30.0
  26. Timothy L. Simpson (2011). Not For Profit: Why Democracy Needs The Humanities. By Martha C. Nussbaum. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (3):593-595.score: 30.0
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  27. Thomas W. Simpson (2012). What Is Trust? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (4):550-569.score: 30.0
    Trust is difficult to define. Instead of doing so, I propose that the best way to understand the concept is through a genealogical account. I show how a root notion of trust arises out of some basic features of what it is for humans to live socially, in which we rely on others to act cooperatively. I explore how this concept acquires resonances of hope and threat, and how we analogically apply this in related but different contexts. The genealogical account (...)
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  28. Robert Simpson (2009). Some Moral Critique of Theodicy is Misplaced, but Not All. Religious Studies 45 (3):339-346.score: 30.0
    Several recent critiques of theodicy have incorporated some form of moral objection to the theodical enterprise, in which the critic argues that one ought not to engage in the practice of theodicy. In defending theodical practice against the moral critique, Atle O. Søvik argues that the moral critique (1) begs the question against theodicy, and (2) misapprehends the implications of the claim that it is inappropriate to espouse a theodicy in certain situations. In this paper I suggest some sympathetic emendations (...)
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  29. Peter Simpson (1992). Contemporary Virtue Ethics and Aristotle. Review of Metaphysics 45 (3):503 - 524.score: 30.0
  30. Robert Mark Simpson (2009). Moral Antitheodicy: Prospects and Problems. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (3):153 - 169.score: 30.0
    Proponents of the view which I call ‘moral antitheodicy’ call for the theistic discourse of theodicy to be abandoned, because, they claim, all theodicies involve some form of moral impropriety. Three arguments in support of this view are examined: the argument from insensitivity, the argument from detachment, and the argument from harmful consequences. After discussing the merits of each argument individually, I attempt to show that they all must presuppose what they are intended to establish, namely, that the set of (...)
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  31. Steven W. Gangestad & Jeffry A. Simpson (2000). The Evolution of Human Mating: Trade-Offs and Strategic Pluralism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):573-587.score: 30.0
    During human evolutionary history, there were “trade-offs” between expending time and energy on child-rearing and mating, so both men and women evolved conditional mating strategies guided by cues signaling the circumstances. Many short-term matings might be successful for some men; others might try to find and keep a single mate, investing their effort in rearing her offspring. Recent evidence suggests that men with features signaling genetic benefits to offspring should be preferred by women as short-term mates, but there are trade-offs (...)
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  32. David Simpson (1992). Communicative Skills in the Constitution of Illocutionary Acts. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (1):82 – 92.score: 30.0
  33. David Simpson (2010). Language and Know-How. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):629–643.score: 30.0
    I address the assumption that communicative interaction is made possible by knowledge of a language. I argue that this assumption as it is usually expressed depends on an unjustified reification of language, and on an unsatisfactory understanding of ‘knowledge’. I propose instead that communicative interaction is made possible by (Rylean) know-how and by the development of (Davidsonian) passing theories. We then come to see that our focus ought to be, not on propositional knowledge of a language which we internally represent, (...)
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  34. Penny M. Simpson, Gene Brown & Robert E. Widing (1998). The Association of Ethical Judgment of Advertising and Selected Advertising Effectiveness Response Variables. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (2):125-136.score: 30.0
    This study examines the potential effects of unethically perceived advertising executionson consumer responses to the ad. The study found that the unethical perceptions of the advertisement shown significantly and negatively affected all advertising response variables examined in the study.
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  35. Tom Simpson (2005). Toward a Reasonable Nativism. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. 1--122.score: 30.0
  36. Evan Simpson (1999). Between Internalism and Externalism in Ethics. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (195):201-214.score: 30.0
    If internalism in ethics is correct, then moral beliefs necessarily motivate. Externalism rejects this thesis, holding that the relationship between beliefs and motives is only contingent. The position I develop is that both views are false. By defining a logical relationship between moral beliefs and motives that is weaker than logical necessitation, it is possible to maintain (contrary to internalism) that beliefs may occur without motives, but (contrary to externalism) that they cannot always do so. The logical point is explicated (...)
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  37. Robert Mark Simpson (2013). Dignity, Harm, and Hate Speech. Law and Philosophy 32 (6):701-728.score: 30.0
    This paper examines two recent contributions to the hate speech literature – by Steven Heyman and Jeremy Waldron – which seek a justification for the legal restriction of hate speech in an account of the way that hate speech infringes against people’s dignity. These analyses look beyond the first-order hurts and disadvantages suffered by the immediate targets of hate speech, and consider the prospect of hate speech sustaining complex social structures whose wide-scale operations lower the social status of members of (...)
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  38. Tom Simpson, Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Amp Amp (2005). Introduction: Nativism Past and Present. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York.score: 30.0
  39. David Simpson (2012). Truth, Perspectivism, and Philosophy. eLogos 2012 (2):1-17.score: 30.0
    In Nietzsche’s later work the problem of the possibility of philosophy presents a significant interpretative and practical dilemma. Nietzsche attempts to undermine the idea of the absolute, as a source of value, meaning and truth, and to tease out the traces of this idea in our philosophising. He is thus one of those who has given us the means to complete the Kantian project of moving beyond metaphysical realism and a representational understanding of meaning. However, along with the gift comes (...)
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  40. David Simpson, Albert Camus. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  41. Lorenzo C. Simpson (2000). Communication and the Politics of Difference: Reading Iris Young. Constellations 7 (3):430-442.score: 30.0
  42. James R. Simpson & Bernard E. Rollin (1984). Economic Consequences of Animal Rights Programs. Journal of Business Ethics 3 (3):215 - 225.score: 30.0
    Readily available data are used to provide relevant decision making information on the highly subjective issue of animal rights. Two examples of alleged crowding; cattle being finished in concrete lots, and broilers in confined operations were evaluated to determine the impact on producers and consumers from increasing space per animal. It is concluded that similar policy changes, such as doubling floor space, can lead to dramatic differences in economic impact depending on the industry affected. It is shown that economic analysis (...)
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  43. Christy Simpson (2004). When Hope Makes Us Vulnerable: A Discussion of Patient–Healthcare Provider Interactions in the Context of Hope. Bioethics 18 (5):428–447.score: 30.0
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  44. Joanne Arciuli & Ian C. Simpson (2012). Statistical Learning Is Related to Reading Ability in Children and Adults. Cognitive Science 36 (2):286-304.score: 30.0
    There is little empirical evidence showing a direct link between a capacity for statistical learning (SL) and proficiency with natural language. Moreover, discussion of the role of SL in language acquisition has seldom focused on literacy development. Our study addressed these issues by investigating the relationship between SL and reading ability in typically developing children and healthy adults. We tested SL using visually presented stimuli within a triplet learning paradigm and examined reading ability by administering the Wide Range Achievement Test (...)
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  45. Zachary Simpson (2013). Emergence and Non‐Personal Theology. Zygon 48 (2):405-427.score: 30.0
    In response to recent theories of emergence which attempt to examine system dynamics and the evolution of complexity from physics to biology and consciousness, a number of theologians have attempted to distill religious insights from a philosophical concept of emergence. Recent work by Terrence Deacon, however, which emphasizes constraint and a process understanding of complexity, undercuts significant features in emergent theologies, namely the privileging of certain loci within emergent complexity, an emphasis on efficient causation, and, theologically, an agential and personal (...)
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  46. Thomas W. Simpson (2012). Evaluating Google as an Epistemic Tool. Metaphilosophy 43 (4):426-445.score: 30.0
    This article develops a social epistemological analysis of Web-based search engines, addressing the following questions. First, what epistemic functions do search engines perform? Second, what dimensions of assessment are appropriate for the epistemic evaluation of search engines? Third, how well do current search engines perform on these? The article explains why they fulfil the role of a surrogate expert, and proposes three ways of assessing their utility as an epistemic tool—timeliness, authority prioritisation, and objectivity. “Personalisation” is a current trend in (...)
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  47. Lane Beckes & Jeffry A. Simpson (2009). Attachment, Reproduction, and Life History Trade-Offs: A Broader View of Human Mating. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):23-24.score: 30.0
    In this commentary, we attempt to broaden thinking and dialogue about how our ancestral past might have affected attachment and reproductive strategies. We highlight the theoretical benefits of formulating specific predictions of how different sources of stress might impact attachment and reproductive strategies differently, and we integrate some of these ideas with another recent evolutionary model of human mating.
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  48. Douglas K. Brown & Stephen G. Simpson (1993). The Baire Category Theorem in Weak Subsystems of Second-Order Arithmetic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 58 (2):557-578.score: 30.0
    Working within weak subsystems of second-order arithmetic Z2 we consider two versions of the Baire Category theorem which are not equivalent over the base system RCA0. We show that one version (B.C.T.I) is provable in RCA0 while the second version (B.C.T.II) requires a stronger system. We introduce two new subsystems of Z2, which we call RCA+ 0 and WKL+ 0, and show that RCA+ 0 suffices to prove B.C.T.II. Some model theory of WKL+ 0 and its importance in view of (...)
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  49. Matthew Simpson (2008). Lectures on the History of Political Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 332-333.score: 30.0
  50. Thomas W. Simpson (2013). Trustworthiness and Moral Character. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):543-557.score: 30.0
    Why are people trustworthy? I argue for two theses. First, we cannot explain many socially important forms of trustworthiness solely in terms of the instrumentally rational seeking of one’s interests, in response to external sanctions or rewards. A richer psychology is required. So, second, possession of moral character is a plausible explanation of some socially important instances when people are trustworthy. I defend this conclusion against the influential account of trust as ‘encapsulated interest’, given by Russell Hardin, on which most (...)
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