Search results for 'Perplexity (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Gareth B. Matthews (1999). Socratic Perplexity and the Nature of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Gareth Matthews suggests that we can better understand the nature of philosophical inquiry if we recognize the central role played by perplexity. The seminal representation of philosophical perplexity is in Plato's dialogues; Matthews examines the intriguing shifts in Plato's attitude to perplexity and suggests that these may represent a course of philosophical development that philosophers follow even today.
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  2.  15
    C. C. W. Taylor (2000). Socratic Perplexity and the Nature of Philosophy. Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):451-454.
  3.  5
    Roslyn Weiss (2001). Socratic Perplexity and the Nature of Philosophy, And: The Philosophy of Socrates (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):137-139.
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  4. G. Santas (2001). MATTHEWS, G.-Socratic Perplexity and the Nature of Philosophy. Philosophical Books 42 (3):196-196.
     
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  5.  3
    V. A. Rodgers (2001). Dialogue and Perplexity J. J. Cleary, G. M. Gurtler (Edd.): Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy, Vol. XIII, 1997 . Pp. Xviii + 291. Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 1999. Cased, $71. ISBN: 90-04-11394-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (01):66-.
  6.  3
    J. Koethe (2014). Perplexity and Plausibility: On Philosophy, Lyrical and Discursive. Common Knowledge 20 (1):55-61.
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  7.  4
    R. F. Stalley (2003). Socratic Aporia G. B. Matthews: Socratic Perplexity and the Nature of Philosophy . Pp. 148. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1999. Cased, £19.99. Isbn: 0-19-823828-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):48-.
  8. Malcolm Clark (1972). Perplexity and Knowledge. The Hague,Nijhoff.
     
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  9.  16
    Gareth B. Matthews (1999). On Valuing Perplexity in Education. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 3:1-10.
    Plato and Aristotle thought that philosophy begins in the perplexed recognition that there are significant puzzles one does not know how to deal with. Some such puzzles can be expressed in questions of the form, ‘How is it possible that p?’, e.g., ‘How is it possible that the world had an absolute beginning?’ I discuss an example of young children asking that last question and go on, with further examples, to make a plea for cultivating such questions as an educational (...)
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  10.  11
    Eduardo H. Flichman (2006). The Function of Perplexity. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 4:23-27.
    I present one specific way of creating problematic situations: generating perplexity. A teacher with a personal history marked by a struggle to conceptualise the words of the professor or of the book, will have paved his way. The teacher develops his subject clearly. When the students say they understand, it is time to show an apparently paradoxical situation. Perplexity appears. The teacher again explains the subject and all accept again that they understand perfectly. But the difficulty doesn't disappear. (...)
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  11.  2
    Stéphan Geonget (2006). La Notion de Perplexité à la Renaissance. Droz.
  12. Peter Boghossian (2011). Socratic Pedagogy: Perplexity, Humiliation, Shame and a Broken Egg. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (7):710-720.
    This article addresses and rebuts the claim that the purpose of the Socratic method is to humiliate, shame, and perplex participants. It clarifies pedagogical and exegetical confusions surrounding the Socratic method, what the Socratic method is, what its epistemological ambitions are, and how the historical Socrates likely viewed it. First, this article explains the Socratic method; second, it clarifies a misunderstanding regarding Socrates' role in intentionally perplexing his interlocutors; third, it discusses two different types of perplexity and relates these (...)
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  13.  9
    Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). The Poverty of Philosophy. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (3):411-432.
    Recently, William Desmond’s metaxological philosophy has been gaining popularity since it proposes a powerful counterweight to the dominance of deconstruction in certain areas of contemporary philosophy of religion. This paper serves to introduce Desmond’s philosophy and confront it with one specific form of Postmodern theology, namely John Caputo’s “weak theology.” Since Desmond’s philosophy is—while thought-provoking and refreshing—not well known, a substantial part of this paper is devoted to fleshing out its central concepts: perplexity, metaxology, and hyperbolic indirection. Afterwards, I (...)
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  14.  11
    Javier Muguerza (2004). Ethics and Perplexity: Toward a Critique of Dialogical Reason. Rodopi.
    Javier Muguerza’s Ethics and Perplexity makes a highly original contribution to the debate over dialogical reason. The work opens with a letter that establishes a parallel between Ethics and Perplexity and Maimonides’s classic Guide of the Perplexed. It concludes with an interview that repeatedly strikes sparks on Spanish philosophy’s emergence from its “long quarantine,” as Muguerza puts it. These informal pieces—witty, informative, conversational—orbit the nucleus of the work: a formidable critique of dialogical reason. The result is a volume (...)
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  15.  18
    François Laruelle (2012). The End Times of Philosophy. Continent 2 (3):160-166.
    Translated by Drew S. Burk and Anthony Paul Smith. Excerpted from Struggle and Utopia at the End Times of Philosophy , (Minneapolis: Univocal Publishing, 2012). THE END TIMES OF PHILOSOPHY The phrase “end times of philosophy” is not a new version of the “end of philosophy” or the “end of history,” themes which have become quite vulgar and nourish all hopes of revenge and powerlessness. Moreover, philosophy itself does not stop proclaiming its own death, admitting itself to be half dead (...)
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  16.  3
    Peyman Vahabzadeh (2005). Of Hegemonies yet to Be Broken: Rhetoric and Philosophy in the Age of Accomplished Metaphysics. The European Legacy 10 (4):375-388.
    This paper situates itself in Reiner Schürmann's theory that the metaphysical representations have hegemonically governed epochs of western history. It argues that the contemporary alertness about the acute loss of affinity between rhetoric and philosophy reports the end of metaphysics. Specifically, the paper discusses that the phenomenon of globalization of scientific rationalism, with its homogenizing effects requires an anarchic mode of thinking and acting and a certain political life that refuses ultimate representations. As such, the proper epochal response to the (...)
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  17.  7
    Stephen Hetherington (2007). Self-Knowledge: Beginning Philosophy Right Here and Now. Broadview Press.
    Self-Knowledge introduces philosophical ideas about knowledge and the self. The book takes the form of a personal meditation: it is one person's attempt to reflect philosophically upon vital aspects of his existence. It shows how profound philosophy can swiftly emerge from intense private reflection upon the details of one's life and, thus, will help the reader take the first steps toward philosophical self-understanding. Along the way, readers will encounter moments of puzzlement, then clarity, followed by more perplexity and further (...)
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  18. Stephen Hetherington (2007). Self-Knowledge: Beginning Philosophy Right Here and Now. Broadview Press.
    _Self-Knowledge_ introduces philosophical ideas about knowledge and the self. The book takes the form of a personal meditation: it is one person’s attempt to reflect philosophically upon vital aspects of his existence. It shows how profound philosophy can swiftly emerge from intense private reflection upon the details of one’s life and, thus, will help the reader take the first steps toward philosophical self-understanding. Along the way, readers will encounter moments of puzzlement, then clarity, followed by more perplexity and further (...)
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  19. John R. Welch (ed.) (2004). Ethics and Perplexity: Toward a Critique of Dialogical Reason. Rodopi.
    Javier Muguerza’s Ethics and Perplexity makes a highly original contribution to the debate over dialogical reason. The work opens with a letter that establishes a parallel between Ethics and Perplexity and Maimonides’s classic Guide of the Perplexed. It concludes with an interview that repeatedly strikes sparks on Spanish philosophy’s emergence from its “long quarantine,” as Muguerza puts it. These informal pieces—witty, informative, conversational—orbit the nucleus of the work: a formidable critique of dialogical reason. The result is a volume (...)
     
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  20.  7
    Erlend Rogne (2009). The Aim of Interpretation is to Create Perplexity in the Face of the Real: Hayden White in Conversation with Erlend Rogne1. History and Theory 48 (1):63-75.
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  21.  20
    Gareth B. Matthews (1997). Perplexity in Plato, Aristotole, and Tarski. Philosophical Studies 85 (2-3):213-228.
  22.  5
    Patrizia Pedrini (2016). On the Pre-Reflective Perplexity of a Schizophrenic Thinker. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (3):243-245.
    I thank Dr. Matthew Parrott and Dr. V.Y. Allison-Bolger very much for their valuable comments on my paper. They have given me the chance to reflect further on the account of thought insertion I propose, and I respond to them with enthusiasm. I also thank the Editor of this journal for arranging this discussion and for giving me the opportunity to reply. Both Dr. Parrott and Dr. Allison-Bolger are concerned about whether my account is fundamentally tenable. They suggest that I (...)
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  23.  8
    Ian Glynn (1999). An Anatomy of Thought the Origin and Machinery of Mind. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Amazon.com Love, fear, hope, calculus, and game shows-how do all these spring from a few delicate pounds of meat? Neurophysiologist Ian Glynn lays the foundation for answering this question in his expansive An Anatomy of Thought, but stops short of committing to one particular theory. The book is a pleasant challenge, presenting the reader with the latest research and thinking about neuroscience and how it relates to various models of consciousness. Combining the aim of a textbook with the style of (...)
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  24.  2
    Matthew Kapstein (1988). Indra's Search for the Self and the Beginnings of Philosophical Perplexity in India. Religious Studies 24 (2):239 - 256.
    In the present essay our concern will be with some of the earliest documents that shed light on the development of Indian reflections on the puzzles of personal identity. These texts are derived from the Upanisads, which exemplify a type of literature that some philosophers may regard as classic, but not as philosophy. What I will be proposing here is that we attempt to regard such very ancient sources of Indian thought more philosophically, more in the manner that some recent (...)
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  25. Ronald M. Carrier (1995). William Desmond, Perplexity and Ultimacy: Metaphysical Thoughts From the Middle Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (6):392-393.
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  26.  9
    Peter Schwankl (1967). On the Phenomenon of Perplexity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 27 (4):553-563.
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  27.  4
    Stephen Appel (1990). Wrong Opinions, Repressions and Pedagogy: Toward 'Perplexity' and Everyday Unhappiness'. Educational Philosophy and Theory 22 (2):1–7.
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  28.  3
    William E. Mann (ed.) (2014). Augustine's Confessions: Philosophy in Autobiography. OUP Oxford.
    Eight new essays examine key philosophical issues raised by Augustine in his Confessions --a masterpiece of world literature. They explore a range of topics including what constitutes the happy or blessed life, the role of philosophical perplexity in the search for truth, and the problems that arise in the attempt to understand minds.
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  29. Chen Shaoming (2006). Jiehuo 解惑 (Resolve Perplexity). Modern Philosophy 5.
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  30. Amber Carpenter & Jonardon Ganeri (2009). Can You Seek the Answer to This Question?(Meno in India). Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):571-594.
    Plato articulates a deep perplexity about inquiry in ?Meno's Paradox??the claim that one can inquire neither into what one knows, nor into what one does not know. Although some commentators have wrestled with the paradox itself, many suppose that the paradox of inquiry is special to Plato, arising from peculiarities of the Socratic elenchus or of Platonic epistemology. But there is nothing peculiarly Platonic in this puzzle. For it arises, too, in classical Indian philosophical discussions, where it is formulated (...)
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  31.  2
    Paul Moyaert (2014). No Ethics Without Resistance: How Lacan Understands Moral Sensibility. Philosophy Today 58 (3):309-324.
    This article pushes Lacan into the area of moral philosophy. In the posthumously published Conversations of Goethe with Eckermann and Soret, Goethe expresses his perplexity concerning a short passage in the tragedy of Antigone in which the eponymous character gives to Creon a rather extravagant justification of her deadly gesture. This essay contends that Lacan’s reference to Goethe in his Ethics of Psychoanalysis clarifies what is at stake in his dialogues with Aristotle and Kant. Moral sensibility gravitates towards contingencies (...)
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  32.  19
    Christopher Cherry (1973). Scepticism and Morality. Philosophy 48 (183):51 - 62.
    In an article called ‘Moral Scepticism’ Professor R. F. Holland displays in a pointed and often impressive way both the virtues and the vices of a tempting approach to certain fundamental issues in moral philosophy. The appeal to sanity and honesty may, when directed towards chronic philosophical perplexity, cease to be a virtue and become the vice of disingenuousness. And when a philosopher writes that ‘no clear idea is available to us of what moral scepticism amounts to’, that moral (...)
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  33.  12
    Mark Weinstein (2004). Ruminations on Philosophical Practice. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (2):153-162.
    An autobiographical narrative forms the basis for the exploration of a tension at the heart of philosophical practice. This paper considers whether Philosophy should be construed as a text-driven, expert-based endeavor as is typical in University programs or whether there is a primordial philosophical experience that grounds a more informal process of philosophical engagement? That is, is Philosophy a natural extension of human perplexity available as a tool for understanding without the trappings of Professorial scholarship and the authority of (...)
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  34.  3
    J. O. Wisdom (1959). Esotericism. Philosophy 34 (131):338-.
    Some readers, even though well versed in philosophy, may be bewildered by Wittgenstein's posthumous book on the philosophy of mathematics and unable to find a dominant theme running through even a part of it; to list the main contents–headings would make them none the wiser. Although two main themes may in the end be discerned in it, they do not pervade the book after the usual manner of themes; one has rather the sense of wandering about the corridors of a (...)
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  35.  1
    J. O. Wisdom (1987). Esotericism. In Joseph Agassi & I. C. Jarvie (eds.), Philosophy. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers 51--68.
    Some readers, even though well versed in philosophy, may be bewildered by Wittgenstein's posthumous book on the philosophy of mathematics and unable to find a dominant theme running through even a part of it; to list the main contents–headings would make them none the wiser. Although two main themes may in the end be discerned in it, they do not pervade the book after the usual manner of themes; one has rather the sense of wandering about the corridors of a (...)
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  36. Julie Yoo, The Other Explanatory Gap.
    One of the driving questions in philosophy of mind is whether a person can be understood in purely physical terms. In this presentation, I wish to continue the project initiated by Donald Davidson, whose subtle position on this question has left many more perplexed than enlightened. The main reason for this perplexity is Davidson’s rather obscure pronouncements about the normativity of intentionality and its role in supporting psychophysical anomalism – the claim that there are no laws bridging our intentional (...)
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  37.  92
    William H. Williams (1992). Is Hume's Shade of Blue a Red Herring? Synthese 92 (1):83 - 99.
    The existence of an idea of a missing shade of blue contradicts Hume's first principle that simple ideas all derive from corresponding simple impressions. Hume dismisses the exception to his principle as unimportant. Why does he do so? His later account of distinctions of reason suggests a systematic way of dealing with simple ideas not derived from simple impressions. Why does he not return to the problem of the missing shade, having offered that account? Several suggestions as to Hume's solution (...)
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  38.  31
    Jean-Pierre Cometti (2013). On Standard and Taste. Wittgenstein and Aesthetic Judgment. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (1):5-15.
    The question of aesthetic judgment is related to a lot of paradoxes that have marked sustainably the reflection on arts, and even arts as such during their modern history. These paradoxes have found a first formulation, apparently clear, in the very famous Hume's essay: "On the standard of taste", but without to lead to a real resolution. In this paper, I would like to approach the question of Hume by starting from what Wittgenstein suggested about aesthetic judgment in his Cambridge (...)
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  39.  19
    Walter Hopp (2014). Experiments in Thought. Perspectives on Science 22 (2):242-263.
    Thought experiments in science, philosophy, and everyday life give rise to all of the following: belief, conviction, justification, perplexity, and, sometimes, knowledge. How? More specifically, what sorts of intentional acts must one perform in order to carry out a thought experiment, what sorts of objects are such acts directed toward, and how are those objects made present, or not, in the carrying out of those acts? My view is that a careful and initially metaphysically unbiased phenomenological description will support (...)
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  40.  19
    Stephen Palmquist, Kant's Theistic Solution to the Problem of Transcendental Theology.
    1. The Problem of Transcendental Theology Kant's transcendental philosophy begins with an attempt to solve the theoretical problem of the possibility of synthetic a priori judgments. In solving this epistemological problem Kant demonstrates how transcendental knowledge (i.e., knowledge of the synthetic a priori conditions for the possibility of experience) is possible only when its application is confined to the realm of empirical knowledge (i.e., to experience). He argues that space, time, and the twelve categories form the transcendental boundary line between (...)
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  41.  4
    André van De Putte (2001). Introduction. Ethical Perspectives 8 (4):231-231.
    The articles in the present issue are the result of a study day on William Desmond’s recent book, Ethics and the Between, held at the K.U.Leuven's Institute of Philosophy. This important book certainly deserves a thorough discussion and for many reasons. It is the manifestation of an ambition that reminds us of past periods in the history of philosophy. These days not so many philosophers venture to set up a body of work — three volumes — in the tradition of (...)
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  42. N. Georgopoulos & Michael Heim (eds.) (1995). Being Human in the Ultimate Studies in the Thought of John M. Anderson. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    For John M. Anderson philosophy, as the love of wisdom, is a concern for what is ultimate. The essays in this volume take to heart this understanding of philosophy, and are therefore responses to the ultimate. The first four essays by Kaelin, Schrag, Baillif and Johnstone, deal with Anderson's own account of ultimacy as it is presented in his reflections on the aesthetic occasion, the experience of the sublime, on freedom and on insight. The concern for what is ultimate is (...)
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  43. David D. Karnos & Robert G. Shoemaker (eds.) (1994). Falling in Love with Wisdom. Oxford University Press Usa.
    David Lynn Hall's love of philosophy began with a fifty-cent paperback. Then an adolescent facing an 18-hour bus trip across the great Southwest, desperate for anything to read, Hall bought Alfred North Whitehead's Adventures of Ideas at a rest stop in Pecos, Texas. He didn't have a clue who Whitehead was, but the book had a colorful, exotic cover, and nothing else on the revolving wire bookrack appealed to him. "I paid fifty cents, boarded the Trailways bus, nestled into my (...)
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  44. N. Georgopoulos & Michael Heim (eds.) (1995). Being Human in the Ultimate: Studies in the Thought of John M. Anderson. Brill | Rodopi.
    For John M. Anderson philosophy, as the love of wisdom, is a concern for what is ultimate. The essays in this volume take to heart this understanding of philosophy, and are therefore responses to the ultimate. The first four essays by Kaelin, Schrag, Baillif and Johnstone, deal with Anderson's own account of ultimacy as it is presented in his reflections on the aesthetic occasion, the experience of the sublime, on freedom and on insight. The concern for what is ultimate is (...)
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  45. Ignacio Falgueras Salinas (1991). El Aprovechamiento de la Perplejidad En la Filosofía Doctrinal En Kant. Anuario Filosófico 24 (2):209-242.
    The aim of this paper is to show how Kant, in constructing his systematic philosophy, makes both implicit and explicit use of his critical solution to the problem of perplexity, which derives from the mismatch between the demand for cognitive com-pleteness and the limitation of objective knowledge.
     
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  46.  46
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1886/1989). Beyond Good and Evil. Vintage.
    “Supposing that truth is a women-what then?” This is the very first sentence in Nietzsche’s Beyond Good and Evil . Not very often are philosophers so disarmingly explicit in their intention to discomfort the reader. In fact, one might say that the natural state of Nietzsche’s reader is one of perplexity. Yet it is in the process of overcoming the perplexity that one realizes how rewarding to have one’s ideas challenged. In Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche critiques the (...)
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  47.  52
    Nick Trakakis (2006). Nietzsche's Perspectivism and Problems of Self-Refutation. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (1):91-110.
    Nietzsche’s perspectivism has aroused the perplexity of many a recent commentator, not least because of the doctrine’s apparent self-refuting character. If, as Nietzsche holds, there are no facts but only interpretations, then how are we to understand this claim itself? Nietzsche’s perspectivism must be construed either as a fact or as one further interpretation—but in the former case the doctrine is clearly self-refuting, while in the latter case any reasons or arguments one may have in support of one’s perspective (...)
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  48.  42
    Roger Pearson (1993). The Fables of Reason: A Study of Voltaire's "Contes Philosophiques". Oxford University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive study in English of Voltaire's contes philosophiques--the philosophical tales for which he is best remembered and which include his masterpiece Candide. Pearson situates each story in its historical and intellectual context and offers new readings in light of modern critical thinking. He rejects the traditional view that Voltaire's contes were the private expression of his philosophical perplexity, and argues that it is narrative that is Voltaire's essential mode of thought. His book is a witty, (...)
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  49. Kieran Setiya (2009). Intention. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Philosophical perplexity about intention begins with its appearance in three guises: intention for the future, as when I intend to complete this entry by the end of the month; the intention with which someone acts, as I am typing with the further intention of writing an introductory sentence; and intentional action, as in the fact that I am typing these words intentionally. As Elizabeth Anscombe wrote in a similar context, ‘it is implausible to say that the word is equivocal (...)
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  50. Denis Edwards (2006). Resurrection of the Body and Transformation of the Universe in the Theology of Karl Rahner. Philosophy and Theology 18 (2):357-383.
    At the end of his life, Rahner pointed to the need for a fully systematic theology that brings out the inner relationship between Jesus Christ and the universe put before us by the natural sciences. In this article, it is argued that Rahner had long been pursuing this theological agenda. His various contributions on this topic arebrought together and discussed within a framework of six systematic elements that are found in his work: self-bestowal as the meaning and purpose of creation; (...)
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