Search results for 'Persistent Vegetative State' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jim Stone (2007). Pascal's Wager and the Persistent Vegetative State. Bioethics 21 (2):84–92.score: 540.0
    I argue that a version of Pascal's Wager applies to the persistent vegetative state with sufficient force that it ought to part of advance directives.
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  2. Jukka Varelius (2013). Pascal's Wager and Deciding About the Life-Sustaining Treatment of Patients in Persistent Vegetative State. Neuroethics 6 (2):277-285.score: 540.0
    An adaptation of Pascal’s Wager argument has been considered useful in deciding about the provision of life-sustaining treatment for patients in persistent vegetative state. In this article, I assess whether people making such decisions should resort to the application of Pascal’s idea. I argue that there is no sufficient reason to give it an important role in making the decisions.
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  3. A. J. Fenwick (1998). Applying Best Interests to Persistent Vegetative State--A Principled Distortion? Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (2):86-92.score: 540.0
    "Best interests" is widely accepted as the appropriate foundation principle for medico-legal decisions concerning treatment withdrawal from patients in persistent vegetative state (PVS). Its application appears to progress logically from earlier use regarding legally incompetent patients. This author argues, however, that such confidence in the relevance of the principle of best interests to PVS is misplaced, and that current construction in this context is questionable on four specific grounds. Furthermore, it is argued that the resulting legal inconsistency (...)
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  4. D. Lanzerath, Ludger Honnefelder & Ulrich Feeser (1998). Nationaler Bericht der Europäischen Befragung: „Doctors' Views on the Management of Patients in Persistent Vegetative State (PVS)“ Im Rahmen des Forschungsprojekts „The Moral and Legal Issues Surrounding the Treatment and Health Care of Patients in Persistent Vegetative State“. [REVIEW] Ethik in der Medizin 10 (3):152-180.score: 540.0
    Definition of the problem: The report supplies the national part of a European survey in which doctors that are involved in the treatment of patients in `Persistent Vegetative State' (PVS) are being interviewed. The questions concern decision-situations the doctors are frequently confronted with in the treatment of PVS-patients. The questionnaire is designed as a decisiontree in order to bring about the exact delineations that govern the decisions. Therefore the result of the survey only portrays which delineations are (...)
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  5. R. Gillon (1998). Persistent Vegetative State, Withdrawal of Artificial Nutrition and Hydration, and the Patient's "Best Interests". Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (2):75-76.score: 450.0
  6. A. J. Fenwick (1999). Best Interests in Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):59-60.score: 450.0
  7. Thomas A. Mappes (2003). Persistent Vegetative State, Prospective Thinking, and Advance Directives. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (2):119-139.score: 360.0
    : This article begins with a discussion of persistent vegetative state (PVS), focusing on concerns related to both diagnosis and prognosis and paying special attention to the 1994 Multi-Society Task Force report on the medical aspects of PVS. The article explores the impact of diagnostic and prognostic uncertainties on prospective thinking regarding the possibility of PVS and considers the closely related question of how prospective thinkers might craft advance directives in order to deal most effectively with this (...)
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  8. Jaak Panksepp, Thomas Fuchs, Victor Garcia & Adam Lesiak (2007). Does Any Aspect of Mind Survive Brain Damage That Typically Leads to a Persistent Vegetative State? Ethical Considerations. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):32-.score: 360.0
    Recent neuroscientific evidence brings into question the conclusion that all aspects of consciousness are gone in patients who have descended into a persistent vegetative state (PVS). Here we summarize the evidence from human brain imaging as well as neurological damage in animals and humans suggesting that some form of consciousness can survive brain damage that commonly causes PVS. We also raise the issue that neuroscientific evidence indicates that raw emotional feelings (primary-process affects) can exist without any cognitive (...)
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  9. J. Blandford (2011). An Examination of the Revisionist Challenge to the Catholic Tradition on Providing Artificial Nutrition and Hydration to Patients in a Persistent Vegetative State. Christian Bioethics 17 (2):153-164.score: 360.0
    The Catholic moral tradition has consistently offered the distinction between ordinary and extraordinary means as a framework for making end-of-life decisions. Recent papal allocutions, however, have raised the question of whether providing artificial nutrition to patients in a persistent vegetative state is to be considered ordinary and thus morally obligatory in all cases. I argue that this “revisionist” position is contrary to Catholic teaching and that enforcing such a position would endanger the ability of Catholic health care (...)
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  10. K. R. Mitchell, I. H. Kerridge & T. J. Lovat (1993). Medical Futility, Treatment Withdrawal and the Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (2):71-76.score: 360.0
    Why do we persist in the relentless pursuit of artificial nourishment and other treatments to maintain a permanently unconscious existence? In facing the future, if not the present world-wide reality of a huge number of persistent vegetative state (PVS) patients, will they be treated because of our ethical commitment to their humanity, or because of an ethical paralysis in the face of biotechnical progress? The PVS patient is cut off from the normal patterns of human connection and (...)
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  11. Peter Clark (2006). Tube Feedings and Persistent Vegetative State Patients: Ordinary or Extraordinary Means? Christian Bioethics 12 (1):43-64.score: 360.0
    This article looks at the late John Paul II's allocution on artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) and the implications his statement will have on the ordinary-extraordinary care distinction. The purpose of this article is threefold: first, to examine the medical condition of a persistent vegetative state (PVS); second, to examine and analyze the Catholic Church's tradition on the ordinary-extraordinary means distinction; and third, to analyze the ethics behind the pope's recent allocution in regards to PVS patients as (...)
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  12. Kevin O'Rourke (2006). Reflections on the Papal Allocution Concerning Care for Persistent Vegetative State Patients. Christian Bioethics 12 (1):83-97.score: 360.0
    This article critically examines the recent papal allocution on patients in a persistent vegetative state with regard to the appropriate conditions for considering “reformable statements.” In the first part of the article, the purpose and meaning of the allocution are assessed. O'Rourke concludes that given consideration of the individual patient's best interest, prolonging artificial nutrition and hydration is not, in every case, the best option. Although he stresses favorability for preservation of the life of the patient through (...)
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  13. John Harvey (2006). The Burdens-Benefits Ratio Consideration for Medical Administration of Nutrition and Hydration to Persons in the Persistent Vegetative State. Christian Bioethics 12 (1):99-106.score: 328.0
    In this article, Harvey notes the initial confusion about the statement made by the pope concerning artificial nutrition and hydration on patients suffering persistent vegetative states (PVS) due to misunderstanding through the translation of the pope's words. He clarifies and assesses what was meant by the statement. He also discusses the problems of terminology concerned with the subject of PVS. Harvey concludes that the papal allocution was in line with traditional Catholic bioethics, and that while maintaining the life (...)
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  14. Gastone G. Celesia (1997). Persistent Vegetative State: Clinical and Ethical Issues. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (3).score: 312.0
    Coma, vegetative state, lock-in syndrome and akinetic mutism are defined. Vegetative state is a state with no evidence of awareness of self or environment and showing cycles of sleep and wakefulness. PVS is an operational definition including time as a variable. PVS is a vegetative state that has endured or continued for at least one month. PVS can be diagnosed with a reasonable amount of medical certainty; however, the diagnosis of PVS must be (...)
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  15. Jacqueline A. Laing (2002). Vegetative State – The Untold Story. New Law Journal 152:1272.score: 306.0
    Airedale NHS Trust v Bland establishes three principles among which is the controversial idea that people in a PVS, though not dying, have no best interests and no meaningful life. Accordingly, it is argued, they may have their food and fluids, whether delivered by tube or manually, removed, with the result that they die. Laing challenges this view arguing that not only is this bad medical science, it is unjustly discriminatory and at odds with our duties to the severely disabled. (...)
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  16. Anil Gomes & Matthew Parrott (forthcoming). Epicurean Aspects of Mental State Attributions. Philosophical Psychology.score: 297.0
    In a recent paper, Gray, Knickman and Wegner (2011) present three experiments which they take to show that people judge patients in a persistent vegetative state (PVS) to have less mental capacity than the dead. They explain this result by claiming that people have implicit dualist or afterlife beliefs. This essay critically evaluates their experimental findings and their proposed explanation. We argue first that the experiments do not support the conclusion that people intuitively think PVS patients have (...)
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  17. Melanie Boly, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville & Philippe Peigneux (2004). Auditory Processing in Severely Brain Injured Patients: Differences Between the Minimally Conscious State and the Persistent Vegetative State. Archives of Neurology 61 (2):233-238.score: 276.0
  18. Neil Levy & Julian Savulescu (2009). Moral Significance of Phenomenal Consciousness. Progress in Brain Research.score: 270.0
    Recent work in neuroimaging suggests that some patients diagnosed as being in the persistent vegetative state are actually conscious. In this paper, we critically examine this new evidence. We argue that though it remains open to alternative interpretations, it strongly suggests the presence of consciousness in some patients. However, we argue that its ethical significance is less than many people seem to think. There are several different kinds of consciousness, and though all kinds of consciousness have some (...)
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  19. Paolo Cattorini & Massimo Reichlin (1997). Persistent Vegetative State: A Presumption to Treat. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (3).score: 270.0
    The article briefly analyzes the concept of a person, arguing that personhood does not coincide with the actual enjoyment of certain intellectual capacities, but is coextensive with the embodiment of a human individual. Since in PVS patients we can observe a human individual functioning as a whole, we must conclude that these patients are still human persons, even if in a condition of extreme impairment. It is then argued that some forms of minimal treatment may not be futile for these (...)
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  20. P. Schotsmans (1993). The Patient in a Persistent Vegetative State: An Ethical Re-Appraisal. Bijdragen, Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie En Theologie 54 (1):2-18.score: 270.0
  21. David M. Zientek (2013). Artificial Nutrition and Hydration in Catholic Healthcare: Balancing Tradition, Recent Teaching, and Law. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (2):145-159.score: 270.0
    Roman Catholics have a long tradition of evaluating medical treatment at the end of life to determine if proposed interventions are proportionate and morally obligatory or disproportionate and morally optional. There has been significant debate within the Catholic community about whether artificially delivered nutrition and hydration can be appreciated as a medical intervention that may be optional in some situations, or if it should be treated as essentially obligatory in all circumstances. Recent statements from the teaching authority of the church (...)
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  22. Carson Strong (1999). Ethical and Legal Aspects of Sperm Retrieval After Death or Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (4):347-358.score: 270.0
  23. Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, D. K. Menon, E. L. Berry, I. S. Johnsrude, J. M. Rodd, Matthew H. Davis & John D. Pickard (2006). Using a Hierarchical Approach to Investigate Residual Auditory Cognition in Persistent Vegetative State. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.score: 270.0
  24. S. J. Rev Peter Clark (2006). Tube Feedings and Persistent Vegetative State Patients: Ordinary or Extraordinary Means? Christian Bioethics 12 (1):43-64.score: 270.0
  25. O'Rourke O. Kevin (2006). Reflections on the Papal Allocution Concerning Care for Persistent Vegetative State Patients. Christian Bioethics 12 (1):83-97.score: 270.0
  26. A. Asai, M. Maekawa, I. Akiguchi, T. Fukui, Y. Miura, N. Tanabe & S. Fukuhara (1999). Survey of Japanese Physicians' Attitudes Towards the Care of Adult Patients in Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):302-308.score: 270.0
  27. Charles Weijer, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Patients in a Persistent Vegetative State: Futile or Acceptable?score: 270.0
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  28. A. Treloar (2000). Japanese Physicians and the Care of Adult Patients in Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):142-142.score: 270.0
  29. Kevin O'rourke Op (2006). Reflections on the Papal Allocution Concerning Care for Persistent Vegetative State Patients. Christian Bioethics 12 (1):83-97.score: 270.0
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  30. Sophie Botros (1995). Acts, Omissions, and Keeping Patients Alive in a Persistent Vegetative State. In Philosophy and Technology. New York: Cambridge University Press. 99-119.score: 270.0
  31. M.-L. Lamau, B. Cadore & P. Boitte (1997). From “the Ethical Treatment of Patients in a Persistent Vegetative State” to a Philosophical Reflection on Contemporary Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (3).score: 270.0
    The reflections put forward in this text concern the clinical and practical difficulties posed by the existence of patients in PVS, and the essential ethical issues raised, combining these ethical questions with practical and theoretical experience.Section 1 presents the methodology of the ethical reflection as we see it.
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  32. Bonnie Steinbock (1989). Recovery From Persistent Vegetative State?: The Case of Carrie Coons. Hastings Center Report 19 (4):14-15.score: 270.0
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  33. Charles Weijer, CPR for Patients in a Persistent Vegetative State?score: 270.0
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  34. Daniel Wikler (1988). Not Dead, Not Dying: Ethical Categories And Persistent Vegetative State. Hastings Center Report 18 (February-March):41-47.score: 270.0
  35. Chris Borthwick (1995). Persistent Vegetative State: A Syndrome in Search of a Name, or a Judgement in Search of a Syndrome? Monash Bioethics Review 14 (2):20-25.score: 270.0
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  36. F. Crispi & C. Crisci (2000). Patients in Persistent Vegetative State... And What of Their Relatives? Nursing Ethics 7 (6):533-535.score: 270.0
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  37. R. Gillon (1993). Persistent Vegetative State and Withdrawal of Nutrition and Hydration. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (2):67-68.score: 270.0
  38. Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.) (2010). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.score: 270.0
    The case of Terri Schiavo, a young woman who spent 15 years in a persistent vegetative state, has emerged as a watershed in debates over end-of-life care. While many observers had thought the right to refuse medical treatment was well established, this case split a family, divided a nation, and counfounded physicians, legislators, and many of the people they treated or represented. In renewing debates over the importance of advance directives, the appropriate role of artificial hydration and (...)
     
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  39. Kurt Gray, T. Anne Knickman & Daniel M. Wegner (2011). More Dead Than Dead: Perceptions of Persons in the Persistent Vegetative State. Cognition 121 (2):275-280.score: 270.0
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  40. J. A. Stewart (1998). Best Interests and Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (5):350-350.score: 270.0
  41. James L. Bernat (1992). The Boundaries of the Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (3):176.score: 270.0
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  42. Ronald E. Cranford (1988). The Persistent Vegetative State: The Medical Reality (Getting the Facts Straight). Hastings Center Report 18 (1):27-28.score: 270.0
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  43. Ellen Fox, Frona C. Daskal & Carol Stocking (2007). Ethics Consultants' Recommendations for Life-Prolonging Treatment of Patients in Persistent Vegetative State: A Follow-Up Study. Journal of Clinical Ethics 18 (1):64.score: 270.0
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  44. Kurt Gray, T. Anne Knickman & Daniel M. Wegner (2011). More Dead Than Dead: Perceptions of Persons in the Persistent Vegetative State. Cognition 121 (2):275-280.score: 270.0
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  45. Donald E. Henke (2008). Consciousness, Terri Schiavo, and the Persistent Vegetative State. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (1):69-85.score: 270.0
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  46. Malcolm Horne (2011). Are People in a Persistent Vegetative State Conscious? Monash Bioethics Review 28 (2):12-1.score: 270.0
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  47. Giovanni Maio (2000). Zur Fernsehmedialen Konstruktion von Bioethik – Eine Analyse der Gestaltungsmerkmale von Fernsehdokumentationen Über Die Sterbehilfe. Ethik in der Medizin 12 (3):122-138.score: 270.0
    A narrative analysis of a sequence from a documentary on the withholding of treatment in persistent vegetative state allows the discernment of several characteristics of the approach of the media to medical ethical problems: (1) The arrangement of the story units in the film sequence corresponds to established patterns of movie dramaturgy. (2) The documentary ”hollywoodizes” morality; it interprets the arena of the problem in the realm of the movie theatre and not in the realm of ethical (...)
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  48. William E. May (2008). Caring for Persons in the “Persistent Vegetative State” and Pope John Paul II's March 20 2004 Address “On Life-Sustaining Treatments and the Vegetative State”. In. [REVIEW] In C. Tollefsen (ed.), Artificial Nutrition and Hydration. Springer Press. 61--76.score: 270.0
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  49. D. Menon, Adrian M. Owen & John D. Pickard (1999). UPDATE-Comment-Response: Cortical Function in the Persistent Vegetative State. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):44-45.score: 270.0
     
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  50. S. J. Rev Peter Clark (2006). Tube Feedings and Persistent Vegetative State Patients: Ordinary or Extraordinary Means? Christian Bioethics 12 (1):43-64.score: 270.0
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