Search results for 'Personal Autonomy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert S. Taylor (2005). Kantian Personal Autonomy. Political Theory 33 (5):602-628.score: 240.0
    Jeremy Waldron has recently raised the question of whether there is anything approximating the creative self-authorship of personal autonomy in the writings of Immanuel Kant. After considering the possibility that Kantian prudential reasoning might serve as a conception of personal autonomy, I argue that the elements of a more suitable conception can be found in Kant’s Tugendlehre or Doctrine of Virtue--specifically, in the imperfect duties of self-perfection and the practical love of others. This discovery is important (...)
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  2. Ludvig Beckman (2004). Are Genetic Self-Tests Dangerous? Assessing the Commercialization of Genetic Testing in Terms of Personal Autonomy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (5-6):387-398.score: 240.0
    Should a growing market for genetic self-tests be welcomed or feared? From the point of view of personal autonomy the increasing availability of predictive health information seems promising. Yet it is frequently pointed out that genetic information about future health may cause anxiety, distress and even loss of life-hopes. In this article the argument that genetic self-tests undermine personal autonomy is assessed and criticized. I contend that opportunities for autonomous choice are not reduced by genetic information (...)
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  3. Claudia Blöser, Aron Schöpf & Marcus Willaschek (2010). Autonomy, Experience, and Reflection. On a Neglected Aspect of Personal Autonomy. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (3):239 - 253.score: 216.0
    The aim of this paper is to suggest that a necessary condition of autonomy has not been sufficiently recognized in the literature: the capacity to critically reflect on one’s practical attitudes (desires, preferences, values, etc.) in the light of new experiences . It will be argued that most prominent accounts of autonomy—ahistorical as well as history-sensitive—have either altogether failed to recognize this condition or at least failed to give an explicit account of it.
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  4. Lars Øystein Ursin (2009). Personal Autonomy and Informed Consent. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (1):17-24.score: 192.0
    Two ways of understanding the notion of autonomy are outlined and discussed in this article, in order to clarify how and if informed consent requirements in biotechnological research are to be justified by the promotion of personal autonomy: A proceduralist conception linking autonomy with authenticity, and a substantivist conception linking autonomy with control. The importance of distinguishing autonomy from liberty is emphasised, which opens for a possible conflict between respecting the freedom and the (...) of research participants. It is argued that this has implications for how consent requirements based on different criteria of specificity and understanding should be viewed and justified. (shrink)
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  5. Diana Meyers, Personal Autonomy and Related Concepts.score: 180.0
    Part I. The book begins with literary, cinematic, and historical scenarios that exemplify personal autonomy. Meyers uses these vignettes to distinguish personal autonomy from other, variously related types of autonomy and to show that other kinds of autonomy cannot adequately address the concern people have with their own personal decisions. Noting how profoundly social experience impinges on self-discovery, self-definition, and self-direction, Meyers characterizes autonomous individuals as persons who do what they really want, and (...)
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  6. Y. M. Barilan (2011). Respect for Personal Autonomy, Human Dignity, and the Problems of Self-Directedness and Botched Autonomy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (5):496-515.score: 180.0
    This paper explores the value of respect for personal autonomy in relation to clearly immoral and irrational acts committed freely and intentionally by competent people. Following Berlin's distinction between two kinds of liberty and Darwall's two kinds of respect, it is argued that coercive suppression of nonautonomous, irrational, and self-harming acts of competent persons is offensive to their human dignity, but not disrespectful of personal autonomy. Irrational and immoral choices made by competent people may claim only (...)
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  7. Monique Deveaux (2007). Personal Autonomy and Cultural Tradition. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 7:87-92.score: 180.0
    The value and importance accorded to personal autonomy within liberalism would seem to suggest that cultural practices that severely constrain the choices of individuals through heavyhanded role socialization and restriction ought to be strongly discouraged in liberal societies. In this paper, I explore this claim in connection with the custom of arranged marriage, which has recently come under fire in some liberal democratic states, notably Britain. My aim is to try to complicate the liberal understanding of the relationship (...)
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  8. Eamon Daly (2010). Personal Autonomy in the Travel Panopticon. Ethics and Information Technology 12 (2):97-108.score: 180.0
    I argue in this paper that the development and convergence of information and communication technologies (ICT) is creating a global network of surveillance capabilities which affect the traveler. These surveillance capabilities are reminiscent of 18th century philosopher Jeremy Bentham’s panopticon, and as such the emerging global surveillance network has been referred to as the travel panopticon. I argue that the travel panopticon is corrosive of personal autonomy, and in doing so I describe and analyse various philosophical approaches to (...)
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  9. Nandini Devi (2013). Supported Decision‐Making and Personal Autonomy for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):792-806.score: 180.0
    Making decisions is an important component of everyday living, and issues surrounding autonomy and self-determination are crucial for persons with intellectual disabilities. Article 12 (Equal Recognition before the Law) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities addresses this issue of decision-making for persons with disabilities: the recognition of legal capacity. Legal capacity means recognizing the right to make decisions for oneself. Article 12 is also moving in the direction of supported decision-making, as an alternative to (...)
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  10. S. A. Paphitis (2010). Questions of the Self in the Personal Autonomy Debate: Some Critical Remarks on Frankfurt and Watson. South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (2).score: 180.0
    Currently, the most influential accounts of personal autonomy, at least in the English-speaking world, focus on providing conditions under which agents can be said to exercise self-control. Two distinct accounts of personal autonomy have emerged in this tradition: firstly, hierarchical models grounded in the work of Harry Frankfurt; and secondly, systems division models most famously articulated by Gary Watson. In this paper, I will show the inadequacies of both of these models by exploring the problematic views (...)
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  11. Lubomira Radoilska (2012). Personal Autonomy, Decisional Capacity, and Mental Disorder. In , Autonomy and Mental Disorder. Oxford University Press.score: 174.0
    In this Introduction, I situate the underlying project “Autonomy and Mental Disorder” with reference to current debates on autonomy in moral and political philosophy, and the philosophy of action. I then offer an overview of the individual contributions. More specifically, I begin by identifying three points of convergence in the debates at issue, stating that autonomy is: 1) a fundamentally liberal concept; 2) an agency concept and; 3) incompatible with (severe) mental disorder. Next, I explore, in the (...)
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  12. Manuel Vargas (2006). Review of James Stacey Taylor (Ed.), Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (8).score: 168.0
    I once heard a colleague opine that we would be better off if there were a 50-year moratorium on philosophers using the word 'autonomy'. He went on to argue that we could get along just fine without the word, and that a good number of confusions would be dispelled along the way. This collection of new papers goes a long way toward responding to this challenge in ways that both undercut and vindicate aspects of this complaint.
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  13. James Stacey Taylor (ed.) (2008). Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy. Cambridge Univ Pr.score: 168.0
    This is the first volume to bring together original essays that address the theoretical foundations of the concept of autonomy, as well as essays that ...
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  14. Sarah Buss, Personal Autonomy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 156.0
    To be autonomous is to be a law to oneself; autonomous agents are self-governing agents. Most of us want to be autonomous because we want to be accountable for what we do, and because it seems that if we are not the ones calling the shots, then we cannot be accountable. More importantly, perhaps, the value of autonomy is tied to the value of self-integration. We don't want to be alien to, or at war with, ourselves; and it seems (...)
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  15. Mason Cash (2010). Extended Cognition, Personal Responsibility, and Relational Autonomy. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):645-671.score: 156.0
    The Hypothesis of Extended Cognition (HEC)—that many cognitive processes are carried out by a hybrid coalition of neural, bodily and environmental factors—entails that the intentional states that are reasons for action might best be ascribed to wider entities of which individual persons are only parts. I look at different kinds of extended cognition and agency, exploring their consequences for concerns about the moral agency and personal responsibility of such extended entities. Can extended entities be moral agents and bear responsibility (...)
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  16. Bernard Berofsky (1995). Liberation From Self: A Theory of Personal Autonomy. Cambridge University Press.score: 156.0
    This is the most detailed, sophisticated and comprehensive treatment of autonomy currently available. Moreover it argues for a quite different conception of autonomy from that found in the philosophical literature. Professor Berofsky claims that the idea of autonomy originating in the self is a seductive but ultimately illusory one. The only serious way of approaching the subject is to pay due attention to psychology, and to view autonomy as the liberation from the disabling effects of physiological (...)
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  17. Edmund Wall (2011). Privacy and the Moral Right to Personal Autonomy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):69-85.score: 156.0
    I argue that the moral right to privacy is the moral right to consent to access by others to one’s personal information. Although this thesis is relatively simple and already implicit in considerations about privacy, it has, nevertheless, been overlooked by philosophers. In the paper, I present and defend my account of the moral right to privacy, respond to possible objections to it, and attempt to show its advantages over two recent accounts: one by Steve Matthews and the other (...)
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  18. J. Stacey Taylor (ed.) (2005). Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and Its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 156.0
    This is the first volume to bring together original essays that address the theoretical foundations of the concept of autonomy, as well as essays that ...
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  19. Diana T. Meyers (1992). Personal Autonomy or the Deconstructed Subject? A Reply to Hekman. Hypatia 7 (1):124 - 132.score: 156.0
    A response to Susan Hekman's article "Reconstituting the Subject: Feminism, Modernism, and Postmodernism" and to her review of Diana T. Meyers' book Self, Society, and Personal Choice both of which appeared in Hypatia 6(2).
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  20. Manne Sjöstrand & Niklas Juth (forthcoming). Authenticity and Psychiatric Disorder: Does Autonomy of Personal Preferences Matter? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-8.score: 156.0
    In healthcare ethics there is a discussion regarding whether autonomy of personal preferences, what sometimes is referred to as authenticity, is necessary for autonomous decision-making. It has been argued that patients’ decisions that lack sufficient authenticity could be deemed as non-autonomous and be justifiably overruled by healthcare staff. The present paper discusses this issue in relation certain psychiatric disorders. It takes its starting point in recent qualitative studies of the experiences and thoughts of patients’ with anorexia nervosa where (...)
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  21. Derek Bolton & Natalie Banner (2012). Does Mental Disorder Involve Loss of Personal Autonomy? In Lubomira Radoilska (ed.), Autonomy and Mental Disorder. Oxford University Press.score: 156.0
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  22. Marilyn Friedman (1998). Romantic Love and Personal Autonomy. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):162-181.score: 150.0
  23. Marina A. L. Oshana (1998). Personal Autonomy and Society. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (1):81-102.score: 150.0
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  24. Diana T. Meyers (1987). Personal Autonomy and the Paradox of Feminine Socialization. Journal of Philosophy 84 (11):619-628.score: 150.0
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  25. Diana Meyers, Part 4.1: The Personal and Political Value of Autonomy.score: 150.0
    Part IV. Section 1. The Personal and the Political Value of Autonomy: Disparities in autonomy competency number among the many ways in which women and men in western societies are unequal. Meyers holds that although personal autonomy is not the sole or paramount value, medial autonomy is not only a personal good, but is also a political good.
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  26. Roni Aviram & Yossi Yonah (2004). 'Flexible Control': Towards a Conception of Personal Autonomy for Postmodern Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (1):3–17.score: 150.0
  27. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2008). Personal Autonomy in Society (Review). Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 202-206.score: 150.0
  28. Stefaan E. Cuypers (1992). Is Personal Autonomy the First Principle of Education? Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (1):5–17.score: 150.0
  29. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2008). Personal Autonomy in Society by Marina Oshana. Hypatia 23 (2):202-206.score: 150.0
  30. Lawrence Haworth (1987). Personal Autonomy: Beyond Negative and Positive Liberty Robert Young International Series of Social and Political Thought London: Croom Helm, 1986. Pp. Ix, 123. £17.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 26 (04):779-.score: 150.0
  31. Alfred Mele (1993). History and Personal Autonomy. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):271 - 280.score: 150.0
  32. David Zimmerman (1999). Born Yesterday: Personal Autonomy for Agents Without a Past. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 23 (1):236–266.score: 150.0
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  33. Robert F. Ladenson (1975). A Theory of Personal Autonomy. Ethics 86 (1):30-48.score: 150.0
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  34. T. L. Zutlevics (2002). Relational Selves, Personal Autonomy and Oppression. Philosophia 29 (1-4):423-436.score: 150.0
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  35. Jean L. Cohen (1999). Personal Autonomy and the Law: Sexual Harassment and the Dilemma of Regulating "Intimacy". Constellations 6 (4):443-472.score: 150.0
  36. Robert Noggle (2011). Marina Oshana, Personal Autonomy in Society. Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (2):233-238.score: 150.0
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  37. M. Quante (2011). In Defence of Personal Autonomy. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (10):597-600.score: 150.0
  38. Denis G. Arnold (1998). Bernard Berofsky, Liberation From the Self: A Theory of Personal Autonomy, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1995, Pp. 270. [REVIEW] Utilitas 10 (3):368-.score: 150.0
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  39. Mikhail Valdman (2007). Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and Its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy - Edited by James Stacey Taylor. Philosophical Books 48 (4):371-373.score: 150.0
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  40. Kenneth Wain (1998). James D. Marshall, Michel Foucault: Personal Autonomy and Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (2/3):163-176.score: 150.0
  41. Peter Gardner (1991). Personal Autonomy and Religious Upbringing: The 'Problem'. Journal of Philosophy of Education 25 (1):69–81.score: 150.0
  42. Joel Anderson & Warren Lux (2004). Knowing Your Own Strength: Accurate Self-Assessment as a Requirement for Personal Autonomy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):279-294.score: 150.0
  43. Holroyd (2008). Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (2):313-317.score: 150.0
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  44. Marina Oshana & Philip Parvin (2007). Personal Autonomy in Society. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):492-496.score: 150.0
  45. Mark Piper (2009). On Respect for Personal Autonomy and the Value Instantiated in Autonomous Choice. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (1):189-198.score: 150.0
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  46. John Santiago (2005). Personal Autonomy. Social Theory and Practice 31 (1):77-104.score: 150.0
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  47. James Stacey Taylor (2003). Stefaan Cuypers, Self-Identity and Personal Autonomy. Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (2):259-265.score: 150.0
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  48. T. L. Zutlevics (2001). Libertarianism and Personal Autonomy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (3):461-471.score: 150.0
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  49. Paul Formosa (2013). Kant's Conception of Personal Autonomy. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (3):193-212.score: 150.0
  50. Irene Sonia Switankowsky (2010). Personal Autonomy in Society. By Marina Oshana. Heythrop Journal 51 (2):351-352.score: 150.0
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