Search results for 'Personal Satisfaction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  3
    George Lan, Chike Okechuku, He Zhang & Jianan Cao (2013). Impact of Job Satisfaction and Personal Values on the Work Orientation of Chinese Accounting Practitioners. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):627-640.
    This study investigates the impact of job satisfaction and personal values on the work orientation of accounting practitioners in China. Satisfaction with work varies across individuals and how individuals view work (i.e., work orientation) may depend not only on satisfaction with various facets of their work but also on their beliefs and values. We used the questionnaire from Wrzesniewski et al. (J Res Pers 31, 21–33, 1997) to measure work orientation. Job satisfaction was measured by (...)
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  2.  3
    Irwin P. Levin, Stephen V. Faraone & Richard D. Herring (1980). Measuring Personal Satisfaction Under Varying Economic Conditions. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 16 (5):356-358.
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    Duane I. Miller & Jeff S. Topping (1991). Factors of Ability, Communication, Grievances, and Personal Optimism as Predictors of Student Satisfaction, Involvement, and Alienation: An Ecological Dissonance Interpretation. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (1):19-20.
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  4. B. A. Sturm & J. C. Dellert (forthcoming). Exploring Nurses' Personal Dignity, Global Self-Esteem and Work Satisfaction. Nursing Ethics.
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  5. Duncan Macintosh (1993). Persons and the Satisfaction of Preferences: Problems in the Rational Kinematics of Values. Journal of Philosophy 60 (4):163-180.
    If one can get the targets of one's current wants only by acquiring new wants (as in the Prisoner's Dilemma), is it rational to do so? Arguably not. For this could justify adopting unsatisfiable wants, violating the rational duty to maximize one's utility. Further, why cause a want's target if one will not then want it? And people "are" their wants. So if these change, people will not survive to enjoy their wants' targets. I reply that one rationally need not (...)
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  6.  1
    Sergio W. Carvalho, Sankar Sen, Márcio de Oliveira Mota & Renata Carneiro de Lima (2010). Consumer Reactions to CSR: A Brazilian Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):291-310.
    In this research, we evaluate the response of Brazilian consumers to corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives accompanied by a price increase. We demonstrate that the extent to which Brazilian consumers perceive a company to be socially responsible (i.e., their CSR perceptions) is related to both the basic transactional outcome of purchase intentions as well as two relational outcomes: the likelihood to switch to a competitor and to complain about the CSR-based price increase. More interestingly, we find that these relationships are (...)
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  7.  54
    Meral Elçi & Lütfihak Alpkan (2009). The Impact of Perceived Organizational Ethical Climate on Work Satisfaction. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):297 - 311.
    This empirical study investigates the effects of nine ethical climate types (self-interest, company profit, efficiency, friendship, team interest, social responsibility, personal morality, company rules and procedures, and lastly laws and professional codes) on employee work satisfaction. The ethical climate typology developed by Victor and Cullen (in W. C. Frederick (ed.) Research in Corporate Social Performance and Policy, 1987; Administrative Science Quarterly 33, 101–125, 1988) is tested on a sample of staff and managers from 62 different telecommunication firms in (...)
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  8.  25
    Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska & Thomas Li-Ping Tang (2012). Work-Related Behavioral Intentions in Macedonia: Coping Strategies, Work Environment, Love of Money, Job Satisfaction, and Demographic Variables. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (3):373-391.
    Based on theory of planned behavior, we develop a theoretical model involving love of money (LOM), job satisfaction (attitude), coping strategies/responses (perceived behavioral control), work environment (subjective norm), and work-related behavioral intentions (behavioral intention). We tested this model using job satisfaction as a mediator and sector (public versus private), personal character (good apples versus bad apples), gender, and income as moderators in a sample of 515 employees and their managers in the Republic of Macedonia. For the whole (...)
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  9.  11
    P. G. Cassematis & R. Wortley (2013). Prediction of Whistleblowing or Non-Reporting Observation: The Role of Personal and Situational Factors. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):615-634.
    This study examined whether it was possible to classify Australian public sector employees as either whistleblowers or non-reporting observers using personal and situational variables. The personal variables were demography (gender, public sector tenure, organisational tenure and age), work attitudes (job satisfaction, trust in management, whistleblowing propensity) and employee behaviour (organisational citizenship behaviour). The situational variables were perceived personal victimisation, fear of reprisals and perceived wrongdoing seriousness. These variables were used as predictors in a (...)
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  10.  33
    Barry Z. Posner (2010). Another Look at the Impact of Personal and Organizational Values Congruency. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):535 - 541.
    This study re-examined the impact of personal and organizational values congruency on positive work outcomes and investigated the extent to which this relationship is affected by demographic variables. Data collection paralleled an earlier study (Posner and Schmidt, Journal of Business Ethics 12,1993, 341) and validated those findings, lending additional credibility to the continuing importance of this phenomenon. Both personal values congruence and organizational values clarity were significantly related to commitment, satisfaction, motivation, anxiety, work stress, and ethics using (...)
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  11.  22
    Yen-Ko Lin, Wei-Che Lee, Liang-Chi Kuo, Yuan-Chia Cheng, Chia-Ju Lin, Hsing-Lin Lin, Chao-Wen Chen & Tsung-Ying Lin (2013). Building an Ethical Environment Improves Patient Privacy and Satisfaction in the Crowded Emergency Department: A Quasi-Experimental Study. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):8-.
    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness of a multifaceted intervention in improving emergency department (ED) patient privacy and satisfaction in the crowded ED setting. Methods: A pre- and post-intervention study was conducted. A multifaceted intervention was implemented in a university-affiliated hospital ED. The intervention developed strategies to improve ED patient privacy and satisfaction, including redesigning the ED environment, process management, access control, and staff education and training, and encouraging ethics consultation. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated using patient (...)
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  12.  15
    Anneli Douglas & Berendien A. Lubbe (2010). An Empirical Investigation Into the Role of Personal-Related Factors on Corporate Travel Policy Compliance. Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):451 - 461.
    This article presents the results of the empirical testing of the corporate travel policy compliance model conceptualised by the authors and first published in the Journal of Business Ethics in 2009. In the previous article, the theory underlying the model was explained. This article follows with the results of the empirical testing of the model and focusses on those related to the influence of personal factors on policy compliance. The constructs used to define personal-related factors include personal (...)
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  13.  2
    Rosamund Stone Zander (2002). The Art of Possibility. Penguin Books.
    Presenting twelve breakthrough practices for bringing creativity into all human endeavors, The Art of Possibility is the dynamic product of an extraordinary partnership. The Art of Possibility combines Benjamin Zander's experience as conductor of the Boston Philharmonic and his talent as a teacher and communicator with psychotherapist Rosamund Stone Zander's genius for designing innovative paradigms for personal and professional fulfillment. The authors' harmoniously interwoven perspectives provide a deep sense of the powerful role that the notion of possibility can play (...)
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  14.  7
    R. Plant (1975). The Greatest Happiness. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):104-106.
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  15.  62
    Robert W. Kolodinsky, Robert A. Giacalone & Carole L. Jurkiewicz (2008). Workplace Values and Outcomes: Exploring Personal, Organizational, and Interactive Workplace Spirituality. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):465 - 480.
    Spiritual values in the workplace, increasingly discussed and applied in the business ethics literature, can be viewed from an individual, organizational, or interactive perspective. The following study examined previously unexplored workplace spirituality outcomes. Using data collected from five samples consisting of full-time workers taking graduate coursework, results indicated that perceptions of organizational-level spirituality (“organizational spirituality”) appear to matter most to attitudinal and attachment-related outcomes. Specifically, organizational spirituality was found to be positively related to job involvement, organizational identification, and work rewards (...)
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  16.  4
    Hakan Sari * (2004). An Analysis of Burnout and Job Satisfaction Among Turkish Special School Headteachers and Teachers, and the Factors Effecting Their Burnout and Job Satisfaction. Educational Studies 30 (3):291-306.
    This study explores issues of burnout and job satisfaction among special school headteachers and teachers in Turkey. The purpose of the study is to determine whether there is a difference between headteachers' and teachers' burnout and job satisfaction in terms of work status, gender and work experiences, and to analyse the factors effecting their burnout and job satisfaction. In this paper, a quantitative approach has been used: 295 subjects responded to the survey. As the research instruments, the (...)
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  17.  31
    W. Kolodinsky Robert, A. Giacalone Robert & L. Jurkiewicz Carole (2008). Workplace Values and Outcomes: Exploring Personal, Organizational, and Interactive Workplace Spirituality. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2).
    Spiritual values in the workplace, increasingly discussed and applied in the business ethics literature, can be viewed from an individual, organizational, or interactive perspective. The following study examined previously unexplored workplace spirituality outcomes. Using data collected from five samples consisting of full-time workers taking graduate coursework, results indicated that perceptions of organizational-level spirituality (“organizational spirituality”) appear to matter most to attitudinal and attachment-related outcomes. Specifically, organizational spirituality was found to be positively related to job involvement, organizational identification, and work rewards (...)
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  18.  6
    Dilek Özden, Şerife Karagözoğlu & Gülay Yıldırım (2013). Intensive Care Nurses' Perception of Futility: Job Satisfaction and Burnout Dimensions. Nursing Ethics 20 (4):0969733012466002.
    Suffering repeated experiences of moral distress in intensive care units due to applications of futility reflects on nurses’ patient care negatively, increases their burnout, and reduces their job satisfaction. This study was carried out to investigate the levels of job satisfaction and exhaustion suffered by intensive care nurses and the relationship between them through the futility dimension of the issue. The study included 138 intensive care nurses. The data were obtained with the futility questionnaire developed by the researchers, (...)
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  19.  1
    Jelena Spanjol, Leona Tam & Vivian Tam (2015). Employer–Employee Congruence in Environmental Values: An Exploration of Effects on Job Satisfaction and Creativity. Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):117-130.
    This study examines how the match between personal and firm-level values regarding environmental responsibility affects employee job satisfaction and creativity and contributes to three literature streams [i.e., social corporate responsibility, creativity, and person–environment fit]. Building on the P–E fit literature, we propose and test environmental orientation fit versus nonfit effects on creativity, identifying job satisfaction as a mediating mechanism and regulatory pressure as a moderator. An empirical investigation indicates that the various environmental orientation fit conditions affect job (...)
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  20.  8
    John White (2002). Education, the Market and the Nature of Personal Well-Being. British Journal of Educational Studies 50 (4):442 - 456.
    A central aim of education has to do with the promotion of the pupil's and other people's well-being. Recent work by John O'Neill locates the strongest justification of the market in an individualistic preference-satisfaction notion of well-being. His own preference for an objective theory of well-being allows us to make a clear separation of educational values from those of the market. Problems in O'Neill's account suggest a third notion of well-being which better supports the separation mentioned.
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  21.  8
    Atsushi Asai, Minako Kishino, Tsuguya Fukui, Masahiko Sakai, Masako Yokota, Kazumi Nakata, Sumiko Sasakabe, Kiyomi Sawada & Fumie Kaiji (1998). Choices of Japanese Patients in the Face of Disagreement. Bioethics 12 (2):162–172.
  22.  53
    Nicole Andreoli & Joel Lefkowitz (2009). Individual and Organizational Antecedents of Misconduct in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):309 - 332.
    A heterogeneous survey sample of for-profit, non-profit and government employees revealed that organizational factors but not personal characteristics were significant antecedents of misconduct and job satisfaction. Formal organizational compliance practices and ethical climate were independent predictors of misconduct, and compliance practices also moderated the relationship between ethical climate and misconduct, as well as between pressure to compromise ethical standards and misconduct. Misconduct was not predicted by level of moral reasoning, age, sex, ethnicity, job status, or size and type (...)
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  23.  22
    Nan Young Kim & Graham Miller (2008). Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in the Korean Tourism Industry. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):941 - 954.
    This study investigates the ethical climate types presented in the Korean tourism industry, the differences in the perceptions of these ethical climate types based on individual/organizational characteristics, and the influence of ethical climate types based on job satisfaction/organizational commitment. Empirical findings of this study identify six ethical climate types and demonstrate significant difference and significant influence of the proposed relationships. This research contributes to the existing body of academic work by using empirical data collected from 820 respondents across 14 (...)
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  24. Gunnar Björnsson & Alexander Almér (2010). The Pragmatics of Insensitive Assessments: Understanding The Relativity of Assessments of Judgments of Personal Taste, Epistemic Modals, and More. In Barbara H. Partee, Michael Glanzberg & Jurģis Šķilters (eds.), The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication. 1-45.
    In assessing the veridicality of utterances, we normally seem to assess the satisfaction of conditions that the speaker had been concerned to get right in making the utterance. However, the debate about assessor-relativism about epistemic modals, predicates of taste, gradable adjectives and conditionals has been largely driven by cases in which seemingly felicitous assessments of utterances are insensitive to aspects of the context of utterance that were highly relevant to the speaker’s choice of words. In this paper, we offer (...)
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  25.  12
    Fan-Chuan Tseng & Yen-Jung Fan (2011). Exploring the Influence of Organizational Ethical Climate on Knowledge Management. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):325 - 342.
    In recent years, knowledge management has been utilized as an essential strategy to foster the creation of organizational intellectual capital. Organizational intellectual capital can be derived both individually and collectively in the process to create, store, share, acquire, and apply personal and organizational knowledge. However, some organizations only focus on the development of public good, despite the concerns arising from individuals' self-interest or possible risks. The different concern of individual and collective perspectives toward knowledge management inevitably leads to ethical (...)
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  26.  24
    Naresh Khatri & Eric W. K. Tsang (2003). Antecedents and Consequences of Cronyism in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (4):289 - 303.
    In this paper we discuss cronyism that exists between superiors and subordinates. Cronyism is defined as favoritism shown by the superior to his or her subordinate based on their relationship, rather than the latter''s capability or qualification, in exchange for the latter''s personal loyalty. We argue that two cultural antecedents, namely particularism and paternalism, give rise to strong ingroup bias and unreserved personal loyalty, which in turn lead to cronyism. We examine the consequences of cronyism at the individual (...)
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  27.  30
    Tim Kasser & Kennon M. Sheldon (2009). Time Affluence as a Path Toward Personal Happiness and Ethical Business Practice: Empirical Evidence From Four Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):243 - 255.
    Many business practices focus on maximizing material affluence, or wealth, despite the fact that a growing empirical literature casts doubt on whether money can buy happiness. We therefore propose that businesses consider the possibility of "time affluence" as an alternative model for improving employee well-being and ethical business practice. Across four studies, results consistently showed that, even after controlling for material affluence, the experience of time affluence was positively related to subjective well-being. Studies 3 and 4 further demonstrated that the (...)
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  28.  23
    Henry Tenggara, Zamralita & P. Tommy Y. S. Suyasa (2010). Kepuasan Kerja Dan Kesejahteraan Psikologi Karyawan. Phronesis 10 (1).
    The purpose of this research is to find the correlation between job satisfaction and psychological well-being among employee. Job satisfaction is an outcome of employee’s feels and thoughts about appraisal of the job, which occur as a result of interaction with work environment, sort of job, and job performance. Psychological well-being is evaluation of a condition from individuals that have personal growth, self-acceptance, positive relations with others, autonomy, purpose in life and environmental mastery. Data was collected from (...)
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  29.  3
    Richard Levi (2010). Philosophical Practice in Rehabilitation Medicine Grasping the Potential for Personal Maturation in Existential Ruptures. Philosophical Practice 5 (2):607-614.
    Rehabilitation medicine, aka Physical medicine and Rehabilitation , is the medical specialty which focuses on optimizing function, ability, participation and life satisfaction in the light of noncurable disability and/or chronic disease. It is primarily geared towards the “so what” than towards “what” . PM & R is holistic and patient-centred, thus comprising a well-suited arena for dialogue and patient participation. Many patients experience a severe crisis reaction in the aftermath of major trauma or disease. This “existential rupture” (...)
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  30.  5
    Max Loxterkamp (2016). Morality, Objective Value and Living a Meaningful Life: A Reply to Steven M. Cahn and Christine Vitrano's Essay ‘Living Well’. Think 15 (43):117-123.
    In their essay, Steven M. Cahn and Christine Vitrano argue that to live a meaningful life all we must do is find personal satisfaction and enjoyment. They argue against other philosophers who claim that activities are what make a life meaningful. There are two problems with what they argue in the essay. The first relates to a particular criticism they make of some of those philosophers taking the contrary view, in regards to the difficulty those philosophers have in (...)
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  31. Cody Gilmore (forthcoming). The Metaphysics of Mortals: Death, Immortality, and Personal Time. Philosophical Studies:1-29.
    Personal time, as opposed to external time, has a certain role to play in the correct account of death and immortality. But saying exactly what that role is, and what role remains for external time, is not straightforward. I formulate and defend accounts of death and immortality that specify these roles precisely.
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  32.  21
    Joachim Schummer, Providing Metaphysical Sense and Orientation: Nature-Chemistry Relationships in the Popular Historiography of Chemistry.
    Historians of science, like all historians, know well that every account of the history of science is necessarily an interpretation of the history of science. It requires decisions on what is important and what not, it requires ordering, contextualizing, and interpreting the available material, and presenting the results in a final form that sounds plausible to readers. Because a majority of the readers of histories of science are scientists, the degree of plausibility and acceptability depends on what scientists expect from (...)
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  33.  3
    Edward A. Synan (1996). Petrus Alfonsi and His Medieval Readers. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (2):295-297.
    BOOK REVIEWS 295 underscore God's existence sola ratione actualizes the biblical narrative, not by request- ing personal satisfaction as he hopes to find the sought-after argument, but, in good monastic-penitential fashion, by having this very argument command redemption for all of humanity. Risking far more than personal disappointment, Anselm's quest for God sola ratione merges prayer and proof to such an extent that any distinction must forthwith be abandoned. Schufreider approaches the Proslogion as a mixture of prayer (...)
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  34. Steven M. Cahn, Christine Vitrano & Robert Talisse (2015). Happiness and Goodness: Philosophical Reflections on Living Well. Cup.
    How should we evaluate the success of each person's life? Countering the prevalent philosophical perspective on the subject, Steven M. Cahn and Christine Vitrano defend the view that our well-being is dependent not on particular activities, accomplishments, or awards but on finding personal satisfaction while treating others with due concern. The authors suggest that moral behavior is not necessary for happiness and does not ensure it. Yet they also argue that morality and happiness are needed for living (...)
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  35. Camille Z. Charles, Mary J. Fischer, Margarita A. Mooney & Douglas S. Massey (2009). Taming the River: Negotiating the Academic, Financial, and Social Currents in Selective Colleges and Universities. Princeton University Press.
    Building on their important findings in The Source of the River, the authors now probe even more deeply into minority underachievement at the college level. Taming the River examines the academic and social dynamics of different ethnic groups during the first two years of college. Focusing on racial differences in academic performance, the book identifies the causes of students' divergent grades and levels of personal satisfaction with their institutions. Using survey data collected from twenty-eight selective colleges and universities, (...)
     
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  36. Lydia G. Cochrane (ed.) (2005). What is the Good Life? University of Chicago Press.
    Has inquiry into the meaning of life become outmoded in a universe where the other-worldiness of religion no longer speaks to us as it once did, or, as Nietzsche proposed, where we are now the creators of our own value? Has the ancient question of the "good life" disappeared, another victim of the technological world? For Luc Ferry, the answer to both questions is a resounding no. In _What Is the Good Life? _Ferry argues that the question of the meaning (...)
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  37. Lydia G. Cochrane (ed.) (2013). What is the Good Life? University of Chicago Press.
    Has inquiry into the meaning of life become outmoded in a universe where the other-worldiness of religion no longer speaks to us as it once did, or, as Nietzsche proposed, where we are now the creators of our own value? Has the ancient question of the "good life" disappeared, another victim of the technological world? For Luc Ferry, the answer to both questions is a resounding no. In _What Is the Good Life? _Ferry argues that the question of the meaning (...)
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  38. Christine A. Hemingway & Patrick W. Maclagan (2004). Managers' Personal Values as Drivers of Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 50 (1):33-44.
    In this theoretical paper, motives for CSR are considered. An underlying assumption is that the commercial imperative is not the sole driver of CSR decision-making in private sector companies, but that the formal adoption and implementation of CSR by corporations could be associated with the changing personal values of individual managers. These values may find expression through the opportunity to exercise discretion, which may arise in various ways. It is suggested that in so far as CSR initiatives represent individuals' (...)
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  39. Eric T. Olson (1997). The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Most philosophers writing about personal identity in recent years claim that what it takes for us to persist through time is a matter of psychology. In this groundbreaking new book, Eric Olson argues that such approaches face daunting problems, and he defends in their place a radically non-psychological account of personal identity. He defines human beings as biological organisms, and claims that no psychological relation is either sufficient or necessary for an organism to persist. Olson rejects (...)
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  40.  62
    Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman (2008). Ethics Programs, Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Job Satisfaction. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):159 - 172.
    Companies offer ethics codes and training to increase employees’ ethical conduct. These programs can also enhance individual work attitudes because ethical organizations are typically valued. Socially responsible companies are likely viewed as ethical organizations and should therefore prompt similar employee job responses. Using survey information collected from 313 business professionals, this exploratory study proposed that perceived corporate social responsibility would mediate the positive relationships between ethics codes/training and job satisfaction. Results indicated that corporate social responsibility (...)
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  41.  37
    Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Hsi Liu (2012). Love of Money and Unethical Behavior Intention: Does an Authentic Supervisor's Personal Integrity and Character (ASPIRE) Make a Difference? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):295-312.
    We investigate the extent to which perceptions of the authenticity of supervisor’s personal integrity and character (ASPIRE) moderate the relationship between people’s love of money (LOM) and propensity to engage in unethical behavior (PUB) among 266 part-time employees who were also business students in a five-wave panel study. We found that a high level of ASPIRE perceptions was related to high love-of-money orientation, high self-esteem, but low unethical behavior intention (PUB). Unethical behavior intention (PUB) was significantly correlated with their (...)
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  42. Stan Klein & Shaun Nichols (2012). Memory and the Sense of Personal Identity. Mind 121 (483):677-702.
    Memory of past episodes provides a sense of personal identity — the sense that I am the same person as someone in the past. We present a neurological case study of a patient who has accurate memories of scenes from his past, but for whom the memories lack the sense of mineness. On the basis of this case study, we propose that the sense of identity derives from two components, one delivering the content of the memory and the other (...)
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  43.  65
    Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Randy K. Chiu (2003). Income, Money Ethic, Pay Satisfaction, Commitment, and Unethical Behavior: Is the Love of Money the Root of Evil for Hong Kong Employees? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (1):13 - 30.
    This study examines a model involving income, the love of money, pay satisfaction, organizational commitment, job changes, and unethical behavior among 211 full-time employees in Hong Kong, China. Direct paths suggested that the love of money was related to unethical behavior, but income (money) was not. Indirect paths showed that income was negatively related to the love of money that, in turn, was negatively related to pay satisfaction that, in turn, was negatively associated with unethical behavior. Pay (...) was positively related to organizational commitment. Thus, the love of money is the root of evil, but money is not. (shrink)
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  44.  84
    Maureen L. Ambrose, Anke Arnaud & Marshall Schminke (2008). Individual Moral Development and Ethical Climate: The Influence of Person–Organization Fit on Job Attitudes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):323 - 333.
    This research examines how the fit between employees moral development and the ethical work climate of their organization affects employee attitudes. Person-organization fit was assessed by matching individuals' level of cognitive moral development with the ethical climate of their organization. The influence of P-O fit on employee attitudes was assessed using a sample of 304 individuals from 73 organizations. In general, the findings support our predictions that fit between personal and organizational ethics is related to higher levels of commitment (...)
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  45. Marilea Bramer (2010). The Importance of Personal Relationships in Kantian Moral Theory: A Reply to Care Ethics. Hypatia 25 (1):121-139.
    Care ethicists have long insisted that Kantian moral theory fails to capture the partiality that ought to be present in our personal relationships. In her most recent book, Virginia Held claims that, unlike impartial moral theories, care ethics guides us in how we should act toward friends and family. Because these actions are performed out of care, they have moral value for a care ethicist. The same actions, Held claims, would not have moral worth for a Kantian because of (...)
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  46.  60
    Cody Gilmore (2015). Personal Identity, Consciousness, and Joints in Nature. Journal of Ethics 19 (3-4):443-466.
    Many philosophers have thought that the problem of personal identity over time is not metaphysically deep. Perhaps the debate between the rival theories is somehow empty or is a ‘merely verbal dispute’. Perhaps questions about personal identity are ‘nonsubstantive’ and fit more for conceptual analysis and close attention to usage than for theorizing in the style of serious metaphysics, theorizing guided by considerations of systematicity, parsimony, explanatory power, and aiming for knowledge about the objective structure of the world. (...)
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  47. David Fritzsche & E. Oz (2007). Personal Values' Influence on the Ethical Dimension of Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics 75 (4):335 - 343.
    Personal values have long been associated with individual decision behavior. The role played by personal values in decision making within an organization is less clear. Past research has found that managers tend to respond to ethical dilemmas situationally. This study examines the relationship between personal values and the ethical dimension of decision making using Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis. The study examines personal values as they relate to five types of ethical (...)
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  48. Robert S. Taylor (2005). Kantian Personal Autonomy. Political Theory 33 (5):602-628.
    Jeremy Waldron has recently raised the question of whether there is anything approximating the creative self-authorship of personal autonomy in the writings of Immanuel Kant. After considering the possibility that Kantian prudential reasoning might serve as a conception of personal autonomy, I argue that the elements of a more suitable conception can be found in Kant’s Tugendlehre or Doctrine of Virtue--specifically, in the imperfect duties of self-perfection and the practical love of others. This discovery is important (...)
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  49. Stan Klein (2015). The Feeling of Personal Ownership of One’s Mental States: A Conceptual Argument and Empirical Evidence for an Essential, but Underappreciated, Mechanism of Mind. Psychology of Consciousness: Research, Practice, and Theory 2:355-376.
    I argue that the feeling that one is the owner of his or her mental states is not an intrinsic property of those states. Rather, it consists in a contingent relation between consciousness and its intentional objects. As such, there are (a variety of) circumstances, varying in their interpretive clarity, in which this relation can come undone. When this happens, the content of consciousness still is apprehended, but the feeling that the content “belongs to me” no longer is secured. I (...)
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    Ingmar Persson (2016). Parfit on Personal Identity: Its Analysis and Importance. Theoria 82 (2):148-165.
    This article examines Derek Parfit's claim in Reasons and Persons that personal identity consists in non-branching psychological continuity with the right kind of cause. It argues that such psychological accounts of our identity fail, but that their main rivals, biological or animalist accounts do not fare better. Instead it proposes an error-theory to the effect that common sense takes us to be identical to our bodies on the erroneous assumption that our minds belong non-derivatively to them, whereas they (...)
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