Search results for 'Persons (International law' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  14
    Anne T. Gallagher (2011). Improving the Effectiveness of the International Law of Human Trafficking: A Vision for the Future of the US Trafficking in Persons Reports. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (3):381-400.
    In 2000, the United States Congress passed the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act requiring its State Department to issue annual Trafficking in Persons Reports (TIP Reports) describing “the nature and extent of severe forms of trafficking in persons” and assessing governmental efforts across the world to combat such trafficking against criteria established by US law. This article examines the opportunities and risks presented by the TIP Reports, tracing their evolution over the past decade and considering their (...)
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  2. Allen E. Buchanan (2004). Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Oxford University Press.
    This book articulates a systematic vision of an international legal system grounded in the commitment to justice for all persons. It provides a probing exploration of the moral issues involved in disputes about secession, ethno-national conflict, "the right of self-determination of peoples," human rights, and the legitimacy of the international legal system itself. Buchanan advances vigorous criticisms of the central dogmas of international relations and international law, arguing that the international legal system should make justice, not simply peace (...)
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  3.  22
    Fernando R. Tesón (2004). Self-Defense in International Law and Rights of Persons. Ethics and International Affairs 18 (1):87–92.
  4. Heather M. Smith (2011). Sex Trafficking: Trends, Challenges, and the Limitations of International Law. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (3):271-286.
    The passage of the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children in 2000 marked the first global effort to address human trafficking in 50 years. Since the passage of the UN Protocol international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individual states have devoted significant resources to eliminating human trafficking. This article critically examines the impact of these efforts with reference to the trends, political, and empirical challenges in data collection and the limitations of international (...)
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  5.  61
    Leslie P. Francis & John G. Francis (2010). Stateless Crimes, Legitimacy, and International Criminal Law: The Case of Organ Trafficking. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):283-295.
    Organ trafficking and trafficking in persons for the purpose of organ transplantation are recognized as significant international problems. Yet these forms of trafficking are largely left out of international criminal law regimes and to some extent of domestic criminal law regimes as well. Trafficking of organs or persons for their organs does not come within the jurisdiction of the ICC, except in very special cases such as when conducted in a manner that conforms to the definitions of genocide (...)
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  6.  15
    Paul B. Stephan (2006). Process Values, International Law, and Justice. Social Philosophy and Policy 23 (1):131-152.
    A focus on the lawmaking process, I submit, permits us to explore a particular dimension of justice, namely the relationship between law and liberty. Laws that reflect the arbitrary whims of the lawmaker are presumptively unjust, because they constrain liberty for no good reason. A strategy for making arbitrary laws less likely involves recognizing checks on the lawmaker's powers and grounding those checks in processes that allow the governed to express their disapproval. The system of checks and balances employed in (...)
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  7. Thomas M. Franck (1998). Fairness in International Law and Institutions. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This book is based on Professor Franck's highly acclaimed Hague Academy General Course. In it he offers a compelling view of the future of international legal reasoning and legal theory. The author offers a critical analysis of the prescriptive norms and institutions of modern international law and argues that international law has the capacity to advance, in practice, the abstract social values shared by the community of states and persons. This book is both thought-provoking and original and as such (...)
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  8. Janne E. Nijman (ed.) (2007). New Perspectives on the Divide Between National and International Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This book aims to contribute to our understanding of one of the most pressing issues of modern international law: the relationship between the international legal order on the one hand and the domestic legal orders of over 190 sovereign states on the other handThe traditional and dominant understanding of this relationship is that there exists a strict separation between the international legal order and domestic legal orders. Processes of legal globalisation and internationalisation have made this relationship much more complex. Legal (...)
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  9.  4
    David Dyzenhaus (2014). Hobbes on the International Rule of Law. Ethics and International Affairs 28 (1):53-64.
    Perhaps the most influential passage on the rule of law in international law comes from chapter 13 of Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan. In the course of describing the miserable condition of mankind in the state of nature, Hobbes remarks to readers who might be skeptical that such a state ever existed that they need only look to international relations—the relations between independent states—to observe one: But though there had never been any time, wherein particular men were in a condition of warre (...)
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  10.  4
    Eva-Maria Svensson (2010). Anu Pylkkänen, Trapped in Equality: Women as Legal Persons in the Modernisation of Finnish Law. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 18 (3):309-313.
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  11.  30
    Andrew Altman (2009). A Liberal Theory of International Justice. Oxford University Press.
    This book advances a novel theory of international justice that combines the orthodox liberal notion that the lives of individuals are what ultimately matter morally with the putatively antiliberal idea of an irreducibly collective right of self-governance. The individual and her rights are placed at center stage insofar as political states are judged legitimate if they adequately protect the human rights of their constituents and respect the rights of all others. Yet, the book argues that legitimate states have a moral (...)
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  12.  4
    Richard Bellamy (2001). The Rule of Law and the Rule of Persons. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (4):221-251.
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  13.  1
    Amanda Potts & Anne Lise Kjær (forthcoming). Constructing Achievement in the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia : A Corpus-Based Critical Discourse Analysis. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-31.
    The International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia was established by the UN Security Council in 1993 to prosecute persons responsible for war crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia during the Balkan wars. As the first international war crimes tribunal since the Nuremburg and Tokyo tribunals set up after WWII, the ICTY has attracted immense interest among legal scholars since its inception, but has failed to garner the same level of attention from researchers in other disciplines, notably linguistics. This represents a (...)
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  14. Christine Chwaszcza (2007). Moral Responsibility and Global Justice: A Human Rights Approach. Nomos.
  15.  58
    Eric Palmer (2004). Real Corporate Responsibility. In John Hooker & Peter Madsen (eds.), International Corporate Responsibility Series. Carnegie Mellon University Press 69-84.
    The Call for Papers for this conference suggests the topic, “international codes of business conduct.” This paper is intended to present a shift from a discussion of codes, or constraints to be placed upon business, to an entirely different topic: to responsibility, which yields duty, and the reciprocal concept, right. Beyond the framework of external regulation and codes of conduct, voluntary or otherwise, lies another possible accounting system: one of real corporate responsibility, which arises out of the evident capability of (...)
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  16. H. G. Callaway (ed.) (2011). Alexander James Dallas: An Exposition of the Causes and Character of the War. An Annotated Edition. Dunedin Academic Press.
    Alexander James Dallas' An Exposition of the Causes and Character of the War was written as part of an effort by the then US government to explain and justify its declaration of war in 1812. However publication coincided with the ratification of the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War. The Exposition is especially interesting for the insight it provides into the self-constraint of American foreign policy and of the conduct of a war. The focus is on the foreign policy (...)
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  17. Thomas Pogge (2000). The International Significance of Human Rights. Journal of Ethics 4 (1-2):45-69.
    A comparative examination of four alternative ways of understandingwhat human rights are supports an institutional understanding assuggested by Article 28 of the Universal Declaration: Human rightsare weighty moral claims on any coercively imposed institutionalorder, national or international (as Article 28 confirms). Any suchorder must afford the persons on whom it is imposed secure accessto the objects of their human rights. This understanding of humanrights is broadly sharable across cultures and narrows the philosophical and practical differences between the friends ofcivil (...)
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  18.  21
    Christopher B. Gray (ed.) (1999). The Philosophy of Law: An Encyclopedia. Garland Pub..
    For the first time, full coverage of the intersections of philosophy and law From articles centering on the detailed and doctrinal exposition of the law to those which reside almost wholly within the realm of philosophical ethics, this volume affords comprehensive treatment to both sides of the philosophicolegal equation. Systematic and sustained coverage of the many dimensions of legal thought gives ample expression to the true breadth and depth of the philosophy of law, with coverage of: *The modes of knowing (...)
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  19.  20
    Heather Alexander & Jonathan Simon (2014). 'Unable to Return' in the 1951 Refugee Convention: Stateless Refugees and Climate Change. Florida Journal of International Law 26 (3):531-574.
    Argues that it is not only a point of literal construction, but also inherent in the object and purpose of the 1951 Refugee Convention, that displaced stateless persons unable to return to their countries of former habitual residence may be eligible for refugee status even if unpersecuted. 'Unable to return' as it occurs in the clause following the semi-colon of 1(A)2 of the 1951 Refugee Convention must be understood as a term of art subject to appropriate canons of construction (...)
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  20.  21
    Janet E. Lord, David Suozzi & Allyn L. Taylor (2010). Lessons From the Experience of U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Addressing the Democratic Deficit in Global Health Governance. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (3):564-579.
    This article reviews the contributions of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to the progressive development of both international human rights law and global health law and governance. It provides a summary of the global situation of persons with disabilities and outlines the progressive development of international disability standards, noting the salience of the shift from a medical model of disability to a rights-based social model reflected in the CRPD. Thereafter, the article considers the (...)
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  21. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (forthcoming). The Law of Laws. Transnational Legal Theory 1 (3).
    How can legal orders coexist? Contemporary lawyers and philosophers frequently accept that a legal system operates under its own terms and is shaped by its own participants. Any problems posed by the plurality of legal orders in the world are to be dealt with by each legal order separately. So persons that are caught in transnational disputes because they are subject to two or more jurisdictions, have recourse to private international law, which is always part of domestic law, i.e. (...)
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  22.  4
    Egidija Puzinskaitė & Romanas Klišauskas (2012). Tax Law System and Charging Principles. Jurisprudence 19 (2):675-695.
    Relying on the systematic, logical, and analytical methods, national legislation and some internationally accepted guidelines, as well as on the research conducted by the Lithuanian scientists and law practitioners, this article consistently and comprehensively deals with the problems arising in the areas of interpretation and application of tax law. The article examines the relevant tax concepts, studies the tax law system, deals with the relevant issues arising in the field of application of legal regulations on taxation, and provides a particularly (...)
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  23.  6
    Lawrence Murugu Mute (2011). Shattering the Glass Ceiling: Ensuring the Right to Vote for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities In Kenya. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 2 (2):1-18.
    Is it self-evident that every Kenyan adult citizen should have the right to vote at national and civic elections or referenda? This is not always the case: certain segments of the population are expressly or implicitly excluded by law or practice from the franchise. This paper suggests that the concept of unsoundness of mind should no longer be the basis for excluding persons with disabilities generally, and those with intellectual disabilities in particular, from voting. It traces provisions in law (...)
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  24. Peter Strasser, Edgar Starz & International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (1997). Personsein Aus Bioethischer Sicht Tagung der Österreichischen Sektion der Ivr in Graz 29. Und 30. November 1996.
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  25. Juliana Rangel de Alvarenga Paes (2005). Le Corps Humain Et le Droit International. Anrt, Atelier National de Reproduction des Thèses.
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  26.  14
    William E. Conklin (2008). Hegel's Laws: The Legitimacy of a Modern Legal Order. Stanford Law Books.
    Hegel's vocabulary -- Hegel's problematic -- Legal reasoning -- Persons, property, contract, and crime -- Legal formalism -- The ethicality of an ethos -- The shapes of family law -- The laws of civil society -- Constitutional shapes and the organic constitution -- Shapes of international law.
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  27.  54
    David A. Reidy (2007). A Just Global Economy: In Defense of Rawls. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 11 (2):193 - 236.
    In The Law of Peoples, John Rawls does not discuss justice and the global economy at great length or in great detail. What he does say has not been well-received. The prevailing view seems to be that what Rawls says in The Law of Peoples regarding global economic justice is both inconsistent with and a betrayal of his own liberal egalitarian commitments, an unexpected and unacceptable defense of the status quo. This view is, I think, mistaken. Rawls’s position on global (...)
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  28.  7
    Lyra Jakulevičienė (2012). Lessons of the First EU Court of Justice Judgments in Asylum Cases. Jurisprudence 19 (2):477-505.
    Starting from 2009, national courts of the EU Member States for the first time gained a “real” right to request the EU Court of Justice for preliminary rulings in asylum matters. First judgments of this Court demonstrate equivocal tendencies: some are blaming the Court for incompetence in asylum matters, others believe that the adoption of authoritative decisions at the European level will assist in developing consistent practice of applying asylum law in the European Union, something that failed at international (...)
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  29.  4
    Claire Garbett (2012). Transitional Justice and 'National Ownership': An Assessment of the Institutional Development of the War Crimes Chamber of Bosnia and Herzegovina. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 13 (1):65-84.
    In anticipation of its closure in 2014, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia has begun to set out proposals for preserving and promoting its legacy of prosecuting persons responsible for violations of humanitarian law during the conflicts of the 1990s. A key aspect of this legacy has been to support the ‘national ownership’ of the justice systems in the former Yugoslavia that will continue to try war crimes cases in the years to come. This study explores the (...)
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  30. Will Kymlicka (2009). Categorizing Groups, Categorizing States: Theorizing Minority Rights in a World of Deep Diversity. Ethics and International Affairs 23 (4):371-388.
    Since 1989 we have witnessed a proliferation of efforts to develop international norms of the rights of ethnocultural minorities, such as the UN's 1992 Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious and Linguistic Minorities, the Council of Europe's 1995 Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities, and the Organization of American States' 1997 draft Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This activity at the level of international law is reflected in a comparable (...)
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  31. David Reidy (2006). Three Human Rights Agendas. Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 19 (2).
    In this paper I distinguish between three conceptions of human rights and thus three human rights agendas. Each is compatible with the others, but distinguishing each from the others has important theoretical and practical advantages. The first conception concerns those human rights tied to natural duties binding all persons to one another independent of and prior to any institutional context and the violation of which would “shock the conscience” of any morally competent person. The second concerns the institutional conditions (...)
     
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  32.  6
    Emmanuelle Lévesque, Yann Joly & Jacques Simard (2011). Return of Research Results: General Principles and International Perspectives. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (4):583-592.
    Five years ago, an article co-written by two of us (Joly and Simard) presented an emerging trend to disclose certain individual genetic results to research participants. Since then, both technologies and research practices have evolved significantly. Given this rapid evolution, our goal is to provide updated and thorough guidance on this issue. Our paper begins by identifying the ethical principles that support the return of results: justice, beneficence, and respect for persons. Then, it presents the results of an analysis (...)
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  33.  30
    Sheila Wildeman (2013). Protecting Rights and Building Capacities: Challenges to Global Mental Health Policy in Light of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (1):48-73.
    The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified mental health as a priority for global health promotion and international development to be targeted through promulgation of evidence-based medical practices, health systems reform, and respect for human rights. Yet these overlapping strategies are marked by tensions as the historical primacy of expert-led initiatives is increasingly subject to challenge by new social movements — in particular, disabled persons' organizations (DPOs). These tensions come into focus upon situating the WHO's mental health policy initiatives (...)
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  34.  2
    Katrina M. Powell, Jenny Dick-Mosher, Anisa Zvonkovic & Pamela B. Teaster (2016). Displacing Marginalized Bodies: How Human Rights Discourses Function in the Law and in Communities. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (1):67-85.
    In this article, we examine disability and eugenics discourses and the ways they function in spaces where vulnerable persons have been historically excluded by the state and blamed for their own “immiseration.” We ask how queer theories of repudiation, abjection, and vulnerability lend insight into the ways that people with intellectual disabilities are discursively located outside normative discourses of home, care, and quality of life, and whether these discourses shifted to serve this vulnerable population when historically the very places (...)
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  35.  3
    William E. Conklin (1996). The Transformation of Meaning: Legal Discourse and Canadian Internment Camps. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 9 (3):227-256.
    This Paper addresses the question as to how legal officials of the Canadian state pictured “persons of the Japanese race” in their internment before, during and after their internment. The legislative and judicial internment and exile of Canadian citizens “of the Japanese race” reads as if the internment and exile is ‘natural’, inevitable, and reasonable and that the judicial decisions posed no choice for the judiciary except to support the internment and exile. The role of the judiciary was held (...)
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  36.  25
    James Turner Johnson (2008). The Idea of Defense in Historical and Contemporary Thinking About Just War. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (4):543-556.
    What is, or should be, the role of defense in thinking about the justification of use of armed force? Contemporary just war thinking prioritizes defense as the principal, and perhaps the only, just cause for resorting to armed force. By contrast, classic just war tradition, while recognizing defense as justification for use of force by private persons, did not reason from self-defense to the justification of the use of force on behalf of the political community, but instead rendered the (...)
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  37. A. John Simmons (2001). On the Territorial Rights of States. Noûs 35 (s1):300-326.
    When officials of some political society portray their state as legitimate - and when do they not! - they intend to be laying claim to a large body of rights, the rights in which their state's legitimacy allegedly consists. The rights claimed are minimally those that states must exercise if they are to retain effective control over their territories and populations in a world composed of numerous autonomous states. Often the rights states are trying to claim in asserting their legitimacy (...)
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  38.  32
    Jiewuh Song, Global Institutions and Relations Among Non-Co-Citizens.
    A common criticism of global institutions is that their rules disproportionately favor the political and economic interests of powerful states over those of weaker states. This dissertation consists of three essays that each deal with a specific application of the criticism. In the first essay, I examine the question of whether international human rights law should include a human right to democracy. Joshua Cohen and Charles Beitz offer two kinds of argument for thinking that it should not. First, protecting a (...)
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  39.  9
    Lawrence O. Gostin (2001). Beyond Moral Claims: A Human Rights Approach in Mental Health. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):264-274.
    Human rights law is a powerful, but often neglected, tool in advancing the rights and freedoms of persons with mental disabilities. International law may seem marginal or unimportant in developed countries with democratic and constitutional systems of their own. Yet, even democracies often resist reform of mental health law and policy, and domestic courts do not always compel changes necessary for the rights and welfare of persons with mental disabilities. Additionally, human rights are obviously important for countries without (...)
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  40.  7
    Prabha Kotiswaran (2012). Vulnerability in Domestic Discourses on Trafficking: Lessons From the Indian Experience. Feminist Legal Studies 20 (3):245-262.
    In recent years, rather than addressing the needs of sex workers themselves or of trafficked persons, international anti-trafficking law has been mobilised towards an ideological end, namely the abolition of sex work. The vulnerability of ‘third world’ female sex workers in particular has provided a potent image for justifying state intervention backed by the full force of the criminal law. Moral legitimacy has been afforded to this by a radical feminist discourse which views sex workers as nothing but hapless (...)
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  41.  6
    Fernando R. Tesón (2011). The Liberal Constitution and Foreign Affairs. Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (1):115-149.
    Scholars have debated the meaning of the foreign-relations clauses in the U.S. Constitution. This essay attempts to outline the foreign-relations clauses that an ideal constitution should have. A liberal constitution must enable the government to implement a morally defensible foreign policy. The first priority is the defense of liberty. The constitution must allow the government to effectively defend persons, territory, and liberal institutions themselves. The liberal government should also contribute to the advancement of global freedom, subject to a number (...)
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  42.  4
    William E. Conklin (2006). A Phenomenological Theory of the Human Rights of an Alien. Ethical Perspectives 13 (3):411-467.
    International human rights law is profoundly oxymoronic. Certain well-known international treaties claim a universal character for human rights, but international tribunals often interpret and enforce these either narrowly or, if widely, they rely upon sovereign states to enforce the rights against themselves.International lawyers and diplomats have usually tried to resolve the apparent contradiction by pressing for more general rules in the form of treaties, legal doctrines, and institutional procedures. Despite such efforts, aliens remain who are neither legal nor illegal and (...)
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  43.  19
    R. Andorno (2004). The Right Not to Know: An Autonomy Based Approach. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):435-439.
    The emerging international biomedical law tends to recognise the right not to know one’s genetic status. However, the basis and conditions for the exercise of this right remain unclear in domestic laws. In addition to this, such a right has been criticised at the theoretical level as being in contradiction with patient’s autonomy, with doctors’ duty to inform patients, and with solidarity with family members. This happens especially when non-disclosure poses a risk of serious harm to the patient’s relatives who, (...)
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  44. William Conklin (2007). Statelessness and Bernhard Waldenfels' Phenomenology of the Alien. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 38:280-296.
    This Paper addresses the problem of statelessness, a problem which remains despite treaties and judicial decisions elaborating distinct rules to protect stateless persons. I explain why this has been so. Drawing from the work of Bernhard Waldenfels, I argue that international and domestic courts have presupposed a territorial sense of space, a territorial knowledge and the founding date for the territorial structure of a state-centric international legal community. I then focus upon the idea that an impartial third party (...)
     
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  45.  19
    Linda Barclay (2013). Cognitive Impairment and the Right to Vote: A Strategic Approach. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):146-159.
    Most democratic countries either limit or deny altogether voting rights for people with cognitive impairments or mental health conditions. Against this weight of legal and practical exclusion, disability advocacy and developments in international human rights law increasingly push in the direction of full voting rights for people with cognitive impairments. Particularly influential has been the adoption by the UN of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2007. Article 29 declares that states must ‘ensure that (...) with disabilities can effectively and fully participate in political and public life on an equal basis with others, directly or through freely chosen representatives, including the right and opportunity for persons with disabilities to vote and be elected’. This article also argues for the right of all people to vote, including people with cognitive impairments, by adopting a uniquely strategic approach. Firstly, some of the strategic limitations of existing arguments in favour of extending the franchise are highlighted. Most such arguments are flawed because they run the risk of inviting disparaging philosophical commentary which compares disabled people to animals, or because they are based on implausible empirical claims, or because they inadvertently tie the case for voting rights for the disabled to other cases unlikely to ever enjoy widespread acceptance. This article, instead, justifies extending voting rights to all people with cognitive impairments based on a simple cost-benefit analysis that avoids all of these problems. (shrink)
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  46.  7
    Laurynas Biekša (2009). Influence of the European Union Directive 2004/83/EC on the Interpretation of Definition of Refugee. Jurisprudence 117 (3):251-261.
    The 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees embody fundamental provisions of refugee law. However, since the adoption of these documents the world has changed dramatically and the laws are not developing fast enough in order to catch up with dynamically changing contemporary situations. The application and interpretation of definition of a refugee was developed through traditional practice of Western states, which was influenced by two world wars and the (...)
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  47.  18
    Gregory Lewis Bynum (2011). Kant's Conception of Respect and African American Education Rights. Educational Theory 61 (1):17-40.
    Immanuel Kant envisioned a kind of respect in which one recognizes each human (1) as being not fully comprehensible by any human understanding, (2) as being an end in him- or herself, and (3) as being a potential source of moral law. In this essay, Gregory Lewis Bynum uses this conception of respect as a lens with which to examine African American education rights on three levels: the individual level (the level of individual persons' moral experience and moral significance), (...)
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  48.  4
    Lijana Štarienė (2009). The Limits of the Use of Undercover Agents and the Right to a Fair Trial Under Article 6(1) of the European Convention on Human Rights. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 117 (3):263-284.
    Various special investigative methods are more often applied nowadays; their use is unavoidably induced by today’s reality in combating organised crime in the spheres such as corruption, prostitution, drug trafficking, trafficking in persons, money counterfeit and etc. Therefore, special secret investigative methods are more often used and they are very effective in gathering evidence for the purpose of detecting and investigating very well-organised or latent crimes. Both the Convention on the Protection on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms itself, i.e. (...)
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  49.  2
    Prof Dr Edson Luiz Sampel (2013). A língua do código canônico. Revista de Teologia (Reveleteo). Issn 2177-952x 7 (12):38-43.
    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the limitation that the Latin language represents in the Code of Canon Law. In fact, the opinion advocated in the present text is that a modern tongue, like English, an international means of communication, could be more proper for the Code, since, nowadays few persons know Latin, even among the experts, and the Code is addressed to the entire people of God (lay and clergy), being the juridical instrument to put into (...)
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    Mitchell Travis (2015). We ’Re All Infected: Legal Personhood, Bare Life and The Walking Dead‘. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 28 (4):787-800.
    This article argues that greater theoretical attention should be paid to the figure of the zombie in the fields of law, cultural studies and philosophy. Using The Walking Dead as a point of critical departure concepts of legal personhood are interrogated in relation to permanent vegetative states, bare life and the notion of the third person. Ultimately, the paper recommends a rejection of personhood; instead favouring a legal and philosophical engagement with humanity and embodiment. Personhood, it is suggested, creates a (...)
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