Search results for 'Pete Wolfendale' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Peter Wolfendale (University of Warwick)
  1. Jessica Wolfendale (2007). Torture and the Military Profession. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    The military claims to be an honourable profession, yet military torture is widespread. Why is the military violating its own values? Jessica Wolfendale argues that the prevalence of military torture is linked to military training methods that cultivate the psychological dispositions connected to crimes of obedience. While these methods are used, the military has no credible claim to professional status. Combating torture requires that we radically rethink the nature of the military profession and military training.
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  2. Jessica Wolfendale (2006). Training Torturers: A Critique of the "Ticking Bomb" Argument. Social Theory & Practice 32 (2):269-288.score: 30.0
  3. Jessica Wolfendale (2007). My Avatar, My Self: Virtual Harm and Attachment. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):111-119.score: 30.0
    Multi-user online environments involve millions of participants world-wide. In these online communities participants can use their online personas – avatars – to chat, fight, make friends, have sex, kill monsters and even get married. Unfortunately participants can also use their avatars to stalk, kill, sexually assault, steal from and torture each other. Despite attempts to minimise the likelihood of interpersonal virtual harm, programmers cannot remove all possibility of online deviant behaviour. Participants are often greatly distressed when their avatars are harmed (...)
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  4. Jessica Wolfendale (2009). The Myth of "Torture Lite". Ethics and International Affairs 23 (1):47-61.score: 30.0
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  5. Jessica Wolfendale (2007). Terrorism, Security, and the Threat of Counterterrorism. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism 30 (1):75-93.score: 30.0
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  6. Jessica Wolfendale (2008). Performance-Enhancing Technologies and Moral Responsibility in the Military. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):28 – 38.score: 30.0
    New scientific advances have created previously unheard of possibilities for enhancing combatants' performance. Future war fighters may be smarter, stronger, and braver than ever before. If these technologies are safe, is there any reason to reject their use? In this article, I argue that the use of enhancements is constrained by the importance of maintaining the moral responsibility of military personnel. This is crucial for two reasons: the military's ethical commitments require military personnel to be morally responsible agents, and moral (...)
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  7. Jessica Wolfendale (2005). The Hardened Heart: The Moral Dangers of Not Forgiving. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (3):344–363.score: 30.0
  8. Jessica Wolfendale (2012). J. Jeremy Wisnewski & R.D. Emerick, The Ethics of Torture (New York: Continuum, 2009), 164 Pages. ISBN: 9780826498908 (Pbk.). Hardback/Paperback: $120/19.99. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (1):137-139.score: 30.0
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  9. Jessica Wolfendale (2011). &Quot;new Wars", Terrorism, and Just War Theory. In Jessica Wolfendale & Paolo Tripodi (eds.), New Wars and New Soldiers: Military Ethics in the Contemporary World. Ashgate.score: 30.0
  10. Jessica Wolfendale (2009). Professional Integrity and Disobedience in the Military. Journal of Military Ethics 8 (2):127-140.score: 30.0
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  11. Jessica Wolfendale & Jeanette Kennett (eds.) (2011). Fashion – Philosophy for Everyone: Thinking with Style. Blackwell.score: 30.0
    This book explores the diverse and sometimes contradictory aspects of fashion in a series of lively, entertaining thoughtful essays from prominent philosophers and writers. Topics include: What is fashion?
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  12. Jessica Wolfendale (2012). Moral Dilemmas of Modern War: Torture, Assassination, and Blackmail in an Age of Asymmetric Conflict – By Michael L. Gross. Theoria 78 (1):75-79.score: 30.0
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  13. Jessica Wolfendale (2008). The Military and the Community: Comparing National Military Forces and Private Military Companies. In Andrew Alexandra, Deane-Peter Baker & Marina Caparini (eds.), Private Military and Security Companies: Ethics, Policies and Civil-Military Relations. Routledge.score: 30.0
  14. Jessica Wolfendale & Paolo Tripodi (eds.) (2011/2012). New Wars and New Soldiers: Military Ethics in the Contemporary World. Ashgate.score: 30.0
  15. Jessica Wolfendale (2009). Preventing Torture in Counterinsurgency and Counterterrorism Operations. In Paul Robinson, Nigel de Lee & Don Carrick (eds.), Ethics Education for Irregular War. Ashgate.score: 30.0
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  16. Jessica Wolfendale (2008). What’s the Point of Teaching Ethics in the Military. In Paul Robinson, Nigel de Lee & Don Carrick (eds.), Ethics Education in the Military. Ashgate. 161--174.score: 30.0
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  17. J. Wolfendale & S. Clarke (2008). Paternalism, Consent, and the Use of Experimental Drugs in the Military. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (4):337-355.score: 30.0
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  18. Jessica Wolfendale (2008). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Performance-Enhancing Technologies and Moral Responsibility in the Military”. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):W4 – W6.score: 30.0
  19. Jessica Wolfendale (2013). Claudia Card, "Confronting Evils: Terrorism, Torture, Genocide". Social Theory and Practice 39 (3):540-548.score: 30.0
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  20. Jessica Wolfendale (2006). Stoic Warriors and Stoic Torturers: The Moral Psychology of Military Torture. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):62-76.score: 30.0
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  21. Jessica Wolfendale (2012). The Concept of Security in Political Violence. In Marie Breen-Smyth (ed.), Ashgate Companion to Political Violence. Ashgate.score: 30.0
  22. Jessica Wolfendale (2013). Psychologists, Torture, and SERE. In Michael L. Gross & Don Carrick (eds.), Military Medical Ethics for the 21st Century. Ashgate.score: 30.0
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  23. James M. Lindsay, Stephen Schlesinger, Kishore Mahbubani, Ruth Wedgwood, John J. Davenport, Francisco Panizza, Romina Miorelli, Jessica Wolfendale & David Sussman (2009). Carnegie Council. Ethics and International Affairs 23.score: 30.0
     
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  24. A. Sigston, P. Curran, A. Labram & S. Wolfendale (1997). Psychology in Practice with Young People, Families and Friends. British Journal of Educational Studies 45:307-308.score: 30.0
     
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  25. Paolo Tripodi & Jessica Wolfendale (eds.) (2011/2012). New Wars and New Soldiers: Military Ethics in the Contemporary World. Ashgate.score: 30.0
     
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  26. Jessica Wolfendale (2013). Claudia Card. Social Theory and Practice 39 (3):540-548.score: 30.0
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  27. Jessica Wolfendale (2007). Military Obedience. In Igor Primoratz (ed.), Politics and Morality. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 30.0
     
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  28. Matteo Colombo (forthcoming). Pete Mandik: This is Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction. Minds and Machines:1-4.score: 12.0
    Pete Mandik’s This is Philosophy of Mind is the latest addition to the “introduction to the philosophy of mind textbook” literature. It is a welcome addition, as Mandik offers readers an encompassing, up-to-date and engagingly written textbook. The objective of This is Philosophy of Mind is to communicate to a wider audience the fascinating and challenging ideas discussed in contemporary philosophy of mind. It is intended as a resource useful for both students taking a course and for anybody else (...)
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  29. Bradford McCall (2013). The Cambridge Companion to Science and Religion. Edited by Pete Harrison . Pp. Xi, 307, Cambridge University Press, 2010, $24.99. Science and Religion: New Historical Perspectives. Edited by Thomas Dixon , Geoffrey Cantor , and Stephen Pumfrey . Pp. Xiv, 317, Cambridge University Press, 2010, $95.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (4):693-694.score: 9.0
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  30. Ginny Whitehouse (2012). Pete/Repeat Tweet/Retweet Blog/Reblog: A Hoax Reveals Media Mimicking. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (1):57-59.score: 9.0
    Journal of Mass Media Ethics, Volume 27, Issue 1, Page 57-59, January-March.
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  31. Yves Laberge (2005). Pete Moore, E = MC2 : Les grandes idées qui ont changé notre monde. Montréal, Hurtubise HMH, 2003, 192 p.Pete Moore, E = MC2 : Les grandes idées qui ont changé notre monde. Montréal, Hurtubise HMH, 2003, 192 p. [REVIEW] Laval Théologique Et Philosophique 61 (3):665-666.score: 9.0
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  32. Cheryl Lyn Dybas (2002). Report From Estuarine Research Federation 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey St. Pete Beach, Florida, 4–9 November 2001. Bioscience 52 (5):405-409.score: 9.0
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  33. Stjepan Gredelj (2006). Virtuelni Povratak" Četvrte" I" Pete" Generacije Migranata. Filozofija I Društvo 1:77-89.score: 9.0
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  34. Stephanie Seavers (2010). Peter Barnet and Pete Dandridge, Eds., Lions, Dragons, and Other Beasts: Aquamanilia of the Middle Ages, Vessels for Church and Table. New Haven, Conn., and London: Yale University Press, for the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2006. Pp. Xii, 206 Plus DVD; Color Frontispiece, Many Black-and-White and Color Figures, and Tables. $50. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (2):360-361.score: 9.0
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  35. Richard Brown & Pete Mandik (forthcoming). On Whether the Higher-Order Thought Theory of Consciousness Entails Cognitive Phenomenology or What is It Like to Think That One Thinks That P? Philosophical Topics 40 (2).score: 3.0
    Among our conscious states are conscious thoughts. The question at the center of the recent growing literature on cognitive phenomenology is this: In consciously thinking P, is there thereby any phenomenology—is there something it’s like? One way of clarifying the question is to say that it concerns whether there is any proprietary phenomenology associated with conscious thought. Is there any phenomenology due to thinking, as opposed to phenomenology that is due to some co-occurring sensation or mental image? In this paper (...)
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  36. Pete Mandik (2000). Objective Subjectivity: Allocentric and Egocentric Representations in Thought and Experience. Dissertation, Washington Universityscore: 3.0
    Many philosophical issues concern questions of objectivity and subjectivity. Of these questions, there are two kinds. The first considers whether something is objective or subjective; the second what it _means_ for something to be objective or subjective.
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  37. Pete Mandik (2009). The Neurophilosophy of Subjectivity. In John Bickle (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
    The so-called subjectivity of conscious experience is central to much recent work in the philosophy of mind. Subjectivity is the alleged property of consciousness whereby one can know what it is like to have certain conscious states only if one has undergone such states oneself. I review neurophilosophical work on consciousness and concepts pertinent to this claim and argue that subjectivity eliminativism is at least as well supported, if not more supported, than subjectivity reductionism.
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  38. Pete Mandik (2001). Mental Representation and the Subjectivity of Consciousness. Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):179-202.score: 3.0
    Many have urged that the biggest obstacles to a physicalistic understanding of consciousness are the problems raised in connection with the subjectivity of consciousness. These problems are most acutely expressed in consideration of the knowledge argument against physicalism. I develop a novel account of the subjectivity of consciousness by explicating the ways in which mental representations may be perspectival. Crucial features of my account involve analogies between the representations involved in sensory experience and the ways in which pictorial representations exhibit (...)
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  39. Pete Mandik (2003). Varieties of Representation in Evolved and Embodied Neural Networks. Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):95-130.score: 3.0
    In this paper I discuss one of the key issuesin the philosophy of neuroscience:neurosemantics. The project of neurosemanticsinvolves explaining what it means for states ofneurons and neural systems to haverepresentational contents. Neurosemantics thusinvolves issues of common concern between thephilosophy of neuroscience and philosophy ofmind. I discuss a problem that arises foraccounts of representational content that Icall ``the economy problem'': the problem ofshowing that a candidate theory of mentalrepresentation can bear the work requiredwithin in the causal economy of a mind and (...)
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  40. Pete Mandik (2007). The Neurophilosophy of Consciousness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. 418--430.score: 3.0
    The neurophilosophy of consciousness brings neuroscience to bear on philosophical issues concerning phenomenal consciousness, especially issues concerning what makes mental states conscious, what it is that we are conscious of, and the nature of the phenomenal character of conscious states. Here attention is given largely to phenomenal consciousness as it arises in vision. The relevant neuroscience concerns not only neurophysiological and neuroanatomical data, but also computational models of neural networks. The neurophilosophical theories that bring such data to bear on the (...)
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  41. John Bickle, Pete Mandik & Anthony Landreth, The Philosophy of Neuroscience. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 3.0
    Over the past three decades, philosophy of science has grown increasingly “local.” Concerns have switched from general features of scientific practice to concepts, issues, and puzzles specific to particular disciplines. Philosophy of neuroscience is a natural result. This emerging area was also spurred by remarkable recent growth in the neurosciences. Cognitive and computational neuroscience continues to encroach upon issues traditionally addressed within the humanities, including the nature of consciousness, action, knowledge, and normativity. Empirical discoveries about brain structure and function suggest (...)
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  42. Pete Mandik, Fine-Grained Supervenience, Cognitive Neuroscience, and the Future of Functionalism.score: 3.0
    The majority of contemporary philosophers of mind are physicalists. The majority of physicalists, however, are non-reductive physicalists. As nonreductive physicalists, these philosophers hold that a system's mental properties are different from a system's physical properties, that is, they hold that the sum total of mental facts about some system is a different set of facts than the sum total of physical facts about the same system. As physicalists, however, these nonreductivists hold that mental facts are nonetheless determined by physical facts, (...)
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  43. William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.) (2001). Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell.score: 3.0
    2. Daugman, J. G. Brain metaphor and brain theory 3. Mundale, J. Neuroanatomical Foundations of Cognition: Connecting the Neuronal Level with the Study of Higher Brain Areas.
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  44. Pete Mandik (2007). Picturing, Showing, and Solipsism in Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. Analysis and Metaphysics 6 (1).score: 3.0
    Of all the enigmatic remarks running through Wittgensteinís Tractatus, none are a greater source of puzzlement to this reader than the endorsement of solipsism in 5.6-5.641. Wittgenstein writes ìI am my worldî, but, even though ìwhat solipsism means, is quite correct...it cannot be said, but it shows itselfî (5.63; 5.62). More intriguing still, he writes.
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  45. Pete Mandik (2010). Swamp Mary's Revenge: Deviant Phenomenal Knowledge and Physicalism. Philosophical Studies 148 (2):231 - 247.score: 3.0
    Deviant phenomenal knowledge is knowing what it's like to have experiences of, e. g., red without actually having had experiences of red. Such a knower is a deviant. Some physicalists have argued and some anti-physicalists have denied that the possibility of deviants undermines anti-physicalism and the Knowledge Argument. The current paper presents new arguments defending the deviant-based attacks on anti-physicalism. Central to my arguments are considerations concerning the psychosemantic underpinnings of deviant phenomenal knowledge. I argue that physicalists are in a (...)
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  46. Pete Mandik (2009). Beware of the Unicorn: Consciousness as Being Represented and Other Things That Don't Exist. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (1):5-36.score: 3.0
    Higher-Order Representational theories of consciousness — HORs — primarily seek to explain a mental state’s being conscious in terms of the mental state’s being represented by another mental state. First-Order Representational theories of consciousness — FORs — primarily seek to explain a property’s being phenomenal in terms of the property being represented in experience. Despite differences in both explanans and explananda, HORs and FORs share a reliance on there being such a property as being represented. In this paper I develop (...)
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  47. Pete Mandik (2005). Action-Oriented Representation. In Andrew Brook & Kathleen Akins (eds.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge University Press. 284--305.score: 3.0
    Often, sensory input underdetermines perception. One such example is the perception of illusory contours. In illusory contour perception, the content of the percept includes the presence of a contour that is absent from the informational content of the sensation. (By “sensation” I mean merely information-bearing events at the transducer level. I intend no further commitment such as the identification of sensations with qualia.) I call instances of perception underdetermined by sensation “underdetermined perception.” The perception of illusory contours is just one (...)
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  48. Alex Vereschagin, Mike Collins & Pete Mandik (2007). Evolving Artificial Minds and Brains. In Drew Khlentzos & Andrea Schalley (eds.), Mental States Volume 1: Evolution, function, nature. John Benjamins.score: 3.0
    We explicate representational content by addressing how representations that ex- plain intelligent behavior might be acquired through processes of Darwinian evo- lution. We present the results of computer simulations of evolved neural network controllers and discuss the similarity of the simulations to real-world examples of neural network control of animal behavior. We argue that focusing on the simplest cases of evolved intelligent behavior, in both simulated and real organisms, reveals that evolved representations must carry information about the creature’s environ- ments (...)
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  49. Pete Mandik, Slow Earth and the Slow-Switching Slowdown Showdown.score: 3.0
    The present paper has three aims. The first and foremost aim is to introduce into philosophy of mind and related areas (philosophy of language, etc) a discussion of Slow Earth, an analogue to the classic Twin Earth scenario that features a difference from aboriginal Earth that hinges on time instead of the distribution of natural kinds. The second aim is to use Slow Earth to call into question the central lessons often alleged to flow from consideration of Twin Earth, lessons (...)
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  50. Pete Mandik (2011). Supervenience and Neuroscience. Synthese 180 (3):443 - 463.score: 3.0
    The philosophical technical term "supervenience" is frequently used in the philosophy of mind as a concise way of characterizing the core idea of physicalism in a manner that is neutral with respect to debates between reductive physicalists and nonreductive physicalists. I argue against this alleged neutrality and side with reductive physicalists. I am especially interested here in debates between psychoneural reductionists and nonreductive functionalist physicalists. Central to my arguments will be considerations concerning how best to articulate the spirit of the (...)
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