Search results for 'Peter A. Morton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Charles Morton (1995). Aristotelian and Cartesian Logic at Harvard: Charles Morton's a Logick System & William Brattle's Compendium of Logick. Published by the Colonial Society of Massachusetts and Distributed by the University Press of Virginia.score: 1500.0
    Machine generated contents note: ARISTOTELIAN AND CARTESIAN LOGIC AT HARVARD -- by Rick Kennedy -- I. Introduction --II. Religiously-Oriented, Dogmatically-Inclined Humanistic Logics from the Renaissance to the Seventeenth Century -- A. Melanchthon and Aristotelianism 01 -- B. Richardson and Ramism 16 -- C. Aristotelianism, Ramism, and Schematic Thinking 25 -- D. Puritan Favoritism From Ramus to Descartes 32 -- E. Cartesian Logic and Christian Skepticism 37 -- F. The Religious and Dogmatic Orientation of The Port-'Royalfogic 42 -- G. Cartesian Logic (...)
     
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  2. Peter A. Morton (1996). A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind: Readings with Commentary. Broadview Press.score: 1410.0
    A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind is designed both to provide a selection of core readings on the subject and to make those readings accessible by providing commentaries to guide the reader through initially intimidating material. Each commentary explains technical concepts and provides background on obscure arguments as they arise, setting them in the historical and intellectual milieu from which they emerged. The readings concentrate on providing the student with a solid grounding in the theories of representative figures (...)
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  3. Peter Gratton, Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Levi Bryant & Paul Ennis (2010). Interviews: Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant and Paul Ennis. Speculations 1 (1):84-134.score: 1170.0
    The context for these interviews was a seminar [Peter Gratton] conducted on speculative realism in the Spring 2010. There has been great interest in speculative realism and one reason Gratton surmise[s] is not just the arguments offered, though [Gratton doesn't] want to take away from them; each of these scholars are vivid writers and great pedagogues, many of whom are in constant contact with their readers via their weblogs. Thus these interviews provided an opportunity to forward student questions about (...)
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  4. Peter Morton (1998). An Institutional Theory of Law: Keeping Law in its Place. Oxford University Press.score: 1170.0
    Peter Morton provides in these pages a fundamental critique of the assumptions of positivist jurisprudence and also puts forth an attack on the foundationalism of contemporary legal philosophy. His prime concern is to distinguish between the different fields of law--penal, civil, and public--taking as his starting point a careful analysis of those institutions in a democracy wherein legal language and norms are in fact generated. Offering an original, coherent, and systematic exposition of law in today's society, Morton (...)
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  5. Peter Morton (ed.) (2010). A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind, Second Edition: Readings with Commentary. Broadview Press.score: 1170.0
    This expanded and revised second edition of Morton's A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind combines primary readings with detailed commentary. The book has two aims: to present the philosophy of mind from a historical perspective so that the theories in the field are seen to emerge in the process of solving problems with earlier theories; and to give the students access to the original source material together with commentaries that explain the technical terms and jargon, outline the (...)
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  6. Timothy Morton (2011). Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones. Continent 1 (3):149-155.score: 900.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 149-155. The world is teeming. Anything can happen. John Cage, “Silence” 1 Autonomy means that although something is part of something else, or related to it in some way, it has its own “law” or “tendency” (Greek, nomos ). In their book on life sciences, Medawar and Medawar state, “Organs and tissues…are composed of cells which…have a high measure of autonomy.”2 Autonomy also has ethical and political valences. De Grazia writes, “In Kant's enormously influential moral philosophy, autonomy (...)
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  7. John Broome & Adam Morton (1994). The Value of a Person. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 68:167 - 198.score: 600.0
    (for Adam Morton's half) I argue that if we take the values of persons to be ordered in a way that allows incomparability, then the problems Broome raises have easy solutions. In particular we can maintain that creating people is morally neutral while killing them has a negative value.
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  8. Caleb Henry Smith, David A. Oakley & John Morton (2013). Increased Response Time of Primed Associates Following an “Episodic” Hypnotic Amnesia Suggestion: A Case of Unconscious Volition. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1305-1317.score: 580.0
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  9. A. Morton (2010). A Virtue Epistemology: Apt Belief and Reflective Knowledge, Volume 1, by Ernest Sosa. Mind 118 (472):1180-1183.score: 540.0
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  10. S. Michaelson & A. Q. Morton (1972). The New Stylometry: A One-Word Test of Authorship for Greek Writers. Classical Quarterly 22 (01):89-.score: 540.0
  11. James D. Bever, Peggy A. Schultz, Anne Pringle & Joseph B. Morton (2001). Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi: More Diverse Than Meets the Eye, and the Ecological Tale of Why The High Diversity of Ecologically Distinct Species of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Within a Single Community has Broad Implications for Plant Ecology. BioScience 51 (11):923-931.score: 540.0
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  12. John Morton, Richard H. Hammersley & D. A. Bekerian (1985). Headed Records: A Model for Memory and its Failures. Cognition 20 (1):1-23.score: 540.0
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  13. Carl Gillett (1998). Peter A. Morton, Ed., A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind: Readings with Commentary Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (1):50-51.score: 450.0
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  14. Adam Morton (1973). If I Were a Dry Well-Made Match. Dialogue 12 (02):322-324.score: 420.0
    I discuss Goodman's claim that when 'all As are Bs' is a law then the counterfactual 'if a were an A, it would be a B' is tue. I give counterexamples, and link the failure of the connection to the contrast between higher level and lower level laws.
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  15. Adam Morton, Space and Sound: A Two Component Theory of Pitch Perception.score: 420.0
    I identify two components in the perception of musical pitches, which make pitch perception more like colour perception than it is usually taken to be. To back up this implausible claim I describe a programme whereby individuals can learn to identify the components in musical tones. I also claim that following this programme can affect one's pitch-recognition capacities.
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  16. Michael R. Prieur, Joan Atkinson, Laurie Hardingham, David Hill, Gillian Kernaghan, Debra Miller, Sandy Morton, Mary Rowell, John F. Vallely & Suzanne Wilson (2006). Stem Cell Research in a Catholic Institution: Yes or No? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (1):73-98.score: 420.0
    : Catholic teaching has no moral difficulties with research on stem cells derived from adult stem cells or fetal cord blood. The ethical problem comes with embryonic stem cells since their genesis involves the destruction of a human embryo. However, there seems to be significant promise of health benefits from such research. Although Catholic teaching does not permit any destruction of human embryos, the question remains whether researchers in a Catholic institution, or any researchers opposed to destruction of human embryos, (...)
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  17. Jennifer M. Morton (2011). The Non-Cognitive Challenge to a Liberal Egalitarian Education. Theory and Research in Education 9 (3):233-250.score: 420.0
    Political liberalism, conceived of as a response to the diversity of conceptions of the good in multicultural societies, aims to put forward a proposal for how to organize political institutions that is acceptable to a wide range of citizens. It does so by remaining neutral between reasonable conceptions of the good while giving all citizens a fair opportunity to access the offices and positions which enable them to pursue their own conception of the good. Public educational institutions are at the (...)
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  18. Adam David Morton (2005). A Double Reading of Gramsci: Beyond the Logic of Contingency. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (4):439-453.score: 420.0
    Abstract In criticising the Italian idealist philosopher Benedetto Croce ? described by Eric Hobsbawm as the first ?post?Marxist? ? Antonio Gramsci elaborated a distinct theory of history. For Gramsci, philosophers such as Croce developed a subjective account of history based on the progression of philosophical thought rather than problems posed by historical development. This essay develops a ?double reading? of Gramsci. First, it presents an overview of a dominant post?Marxist reading of Gramsci?s approach to historical materialism, which constructs a closed (...)
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  19. Adam Morton (1990). Why There is No Concept of a Person. In Christopher Gill (ed.), The Person and the Human Mind: Issues in Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 420.0
    (written years later) I argue that the schematic concept of a person as found in discussions of personal identity could not be used by real humans of themselves, and is not much of a guide for imagining possible beings. Issues of demonstrative self-knowledge play a large role in the argument.
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  20. Brian R. Clack, C. B. & H. P. (1996). Eberhard Herrmann. Scientific Theory and Religious Belief: An Essay on the Rationality of Views of Life. Pp. 128. (Kampen, The Netherlands: Kok Pharos Publishing House, 1995.) Dfl. 69.90.Peter Van Inwagen. God, Knowledge and Mystery: Essays in Philosophical Theology, Pp. 284. (Ithaca & London: Cornell University Press, 1995.)Morton Klass. Ordered Universes: Approaches to the Anthropology of Religion. Pp. Xiv + 177. (Oxford: Westview Press, 1995.) £37.00 Hb, £11.50 Pb.Ian S. Markham. Plurality and Christian Ethics. Pp. Xiv + 225. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.) £32.50.M. A. Stewart & John P. Wright, Ed. Hume and Hume's Connexions. Pp. Xvi + 266. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1994.) £39.50. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 32 (2):293.score: 405.0
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  21. Adam Morton (1996). Folk Psychology is Not a Predictive Device. Mind 105 (417):119-37.score: 360.0
  22. Adam Morton (2003). A Guide Through the Theory of Knowledge. Blackwell Pub..score: 360.0
    The third edition of this highly acclaimed text is ideal for introductory courses in epistemology.
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  23. Adam Morton (2010). Central and Marginal Forgiveness: Comments on Charles Griswold's Forgiveness; a Philosophical Exploration. Philosophia 38 (3):439-444.score: 360.0
    I discuss Charles Griswold’s Forgiveness, arguing that he classifies as marginal many cases that we normally count as forgiveness. Moreover the phenomenon that he calls “forgiveness at its best” may include some awful aspects of human nature. Nevertheless, there are central and important aspects of the concept that are captured by his discussion.
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  24. Adam Morton (1979). Book Review:Studies in Perception Peter K. Machamer, Robert G. Turnbull. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 46 (4):657-.score: 360.0
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  25. Adam David Morton (2007). Spaces of Global Capitalism: Towards a Theory of Uneven Geographical Development. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (3):381.score: 360.0
  26. Adam Morton (2013). Reasoning: A Social Picture. By Anthony Simon Laden. (Oxford UP, 2012. Pp. 283. Price £33.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):843-846.score: 360.0
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  27. Adam Morton (1989). Why There is No Concept of a Person. In Gill, Ed. *The Person and the Human Mind*:. In Ancient and Modern Philosophy. New York: Clarendon Press.score: 360.0
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  28. Adam Morton (1988). A Note on Comparing Death and Pain. Bioethics 2 (2):129–135.score: 360.0
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  29. John Morton, Robert G. Crowder & Harvey A. Prussin (1971). Experiments with the Stimulus Suffix Effect. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):169-190.score: 360.0
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  30. Adam Morton (2013). Reasoning: A Social Picture. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):843-846.score: 360.0
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  31. A. Morton (2001). Lore-Abiding People. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (3):601-606.score: 360.0
    I evaluate Kusch's arguments that everyday and scientific psychological beliefs are made true by the institutional facts about the people to whom they are applied. I conclude that institutional facts are among the truth-makers of such beliefs, and that this is a very significant point to have made, but that they are unlikely to be the sole such truth-makers.
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  32. Sofka Barreau & John Morton (1999). Pulling Smarties Out of a Bag: A Headed Records Analysis of Children's Recall of Their Own Past Beliefs. Cognition 73 (1):65-87.score: 360.0
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  33. Keith Morton (1996). A Smart Start to Service-Learning. Journal of Business Ethics 15:21-32.score: 360.0
     
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  34. Adam Morton (1989). Causation: A Realist Approach. Philosophical Books 30 (3):157-161.score: 360.0
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  35. John Morton (1991). Cognitive Pathologies of Memory: A Headed Records. In William Kessen, Andrew Ortony & Fergus I. M. Craik (eds.), Memories, Thoughts, and Emotions: Essays in Honor of George Mandler. Lawrence Erlbaum. 199.score: 360.0
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  36. Adam Morton (2004). Ensinar a filosofar. Critica.score: 360.0
    this seems to be an unauthorized translation from the introduction to *Philosophy in Practice*.
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  37. John Morton (1984). What Kind of a Framework? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):75.score: 360.0
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  38. Adam Morton (2004). On Evil. Routledge.score: 300.0
    Evil has long fascinated psychologists, philosophers, novelists and playwrights but remains an incredibly difficult concept to talk about. On Evil is a compelling and at times disturbing tour of the many faces of evil. What is evil, and what makes people do awful things? If we can explain evil, do we explain it away? Can we imagine the mind of a serial killer, or does such evil defy description? Does evil depend on a contrast with good, as religion tells us, (...)
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  39. Ronald De Sousa & Adam Morton (2002). Emotional Truth. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76:247 - 275.score: 300.0
    [Ronald de Sousa] Taking literally the concept of emotional truth requires breaking the monopoly on truth of belief-like states. To this end, I look to perceptions for a model of non-propositional states that might be true or false, and to desires for a model of propositional attitudes the norm of which is other than the semantic satisfaction of their propositional object. Those models inspire a conception of generic truth, which can admit of degrees for analogue representations such as emotions; belief-like (...)
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  40. Stephen Morton (2007). Gayatri Spivak: Ethics, Subalternity and the Critique of Postcolonial Reason. Polity.score: 300.0
    Gayatri Chakravorty Spivaks seminal contribution to contemporary thought defies disciplinary boundaries. From her early translations of Derrida to her subsequent engagement with Marxism, feminism and postcolonial studies and her recent work on human rights, the war on terror and globalization, she has proved to be one of the most vital of present-day thinkers. In this book Stephen Morton offers a wide-ranging introduction to and critique of Spivaks work. He examines her engagements with philosophers and other thinkers from Kant to (...)
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  41. J. Bruce Morton, Fredrick Ezekiel & Heather A. Wilk (2011). Cognitive Control: Easy to Identify But Hard to Define. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):212-216.score: 300.0
    Cognitive control is easy to identify in its effects, but difficult to grasp conceptually. This creates somewhat of a puzzle: Is cognitive control a bona fide process or an epiphenomenon that merely exists in the mind of the observer? The topiCS special edition on cognitive control presents a broad set of perspectives on this issue and helps to clarify central conceptual and empirical challenges confronting the field. Our commentary provides a summary of and critical response to each of the papers.
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  42. Adam Morton (2012). Contrastive Knowledge. In Martijn Blaauw (ed.), Contrastivism in Philosophy: New Perspectives. Routledge. 74-89.score: 300.0
    The claim of this paper is that the everyday functions of knowledge make most sense if we see knowledge as contrastive. That is, we can best understand how the concept does what it does by thinking in terms of a relation “a knows that p rather than q.” There is always a contrast with an alternative. Contrastive interpretations of knowledge, and objections to them, have become fairly common in recent philosophy. The version defended here is fairly mild in that there (...)
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  43. Adam Morton (2012). Bounded Thinking: Intellectual Virtues for Limited Agents. Oup Oxford.score: 300.0
    Adam Morton offers a new account of the virtues of limitation management: intellectual virtues of adapting to the fact that we cannot solve many of the problems that we can describe. He argues that the best response to many problems depends not on the most rationally promising solution, but on the most likely route to success.
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  44. Adam Morton (2002). Emotional Truth: Emotional Accuracy. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76 (76):265-275.score: 300.0
    [Ronald de Sousa] Taking literally the concept of emotional truth requires breaking the monopoly on truth of belief-like states. To this end, I look to perceptions for a model of non-propositional states that might be true or false, and to desires for a model of propositional attitudes the norm of which is other than the semantic satisfaction of their propositional object. Those models inspire a conception of generic truth, which can admit of degrees for analogue representations such as emotions; belief-like (...)
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  45. Paul Thomas & Tim Morton (2013). Kissing in the Shadow. Continent 2 (4):289-334.score: 300.0
    In late August 2012, artist Paul Thomas and philosopher Timothy Morton took a stroll up and down King Street in Newtown, Sydney. They took photographs. If you walk too slowly down the street, you find yourself caught in the honey of aesthetic zones emitted by thousands and thousands of beings. If you want to get from A to B, you had better hurry up. Is there any space between anything? Do we not, when we look for such a space, (...)
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  46. Graham A. Murrell & John Morton (1974). Word Recognition and Morphemic Structure. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (6):963.score: 280.0
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  47. B. Hunter & A. Morton (2010). Reflective Knowledge: Apt Belief and Reflective Knowledge, Volume II, by Ernest Sosa. Mind 119 (475):856-860.score: 240.0
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  48. A. Morton (2006). Review: Understanding People: Normativity and Rationalizing Explanation. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (459):777-780.score: 240.0
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  49. A. G. Morton (1989). Daniel Zohary, Maria Hopf: Domestication of Plants in the Old World. The Origin and Spread of Cultivated Plants in West Asia, Europe, and the Nile Valley. (Oxford Science Publications.) Pp. Ix + 249; 39 Figures, 25 Maps. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988. £35. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (01):160-161.score: 240.0
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  50. M. Levison, A. Q. Morton & A. D. Winspear (1968). The Seventh Letter of Plato. Mind 77 (307):309-325.score: 240.0
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