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  1. Peter Abell (2000). Putting Social Theory Right? Sociological Theory 18 (3):518-523.
    The paper considers some of the implications of Coleman Diagrams in the context of the study of social interaction at the microlevel. Such studies cannot be adequately modeled without improved theoretical rigor. The Theory of Comparative Narratives is advanced as one possible analytical framework of the modeling of interactions.
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  2. Peter Abell (1997). Rejoinder to Horvat. Critical Review 11 (2):319-321.
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  3. Peter Abell (1997). Response to Prychitko. Critical Review 11 (2):311-313.
  4. Peter Abell (1995). Self‐Management: Is It Postmodernist? Critical Review 9 (3):341-348.
    Conceptions of self?management and the labor managed firm (LMF) have not been well received by economists. They have, however, proved to be a continuing (though minority) interest in the socialist movement from Marx onwards. Prychitko claims that by examining the humanist side of Marx, a socialist case can be made both for the LMF and markets in a postmodern world. Such a case rests upon an assumption that self?management confers competitive advantage by enhancing information sharing (increasingly important in (...)
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  5. Peter Abell (1991). Homo Sociologicus: Do We Need Him/Her? Sociological Theory 9 (2):195-198.
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  6. Peter Abell (1984). Comparative Narratives: Some Rules for the Study of Action. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 14 (3):309–331.
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