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Peter S. Alagona [5]Peter Alagona [1]
  1. Peter S. Alagona (2012). A Sanctuary for Science: The Hastings Natural History Reservation and the Origins of the University of California's Natural Reserve System. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 45 (4):651 - 680.
    In 1937 Joseph Grinnell founded the University of California's (U.C.) first biological field station, the Hastings Natural History Reservation. Hastings became a center for field biology on the West Coast, and by 1960 it was serving as a model for the creation of additional U.C. reserves. Today, the U.C. Natural Reserve System (NRS) is the largest and most diverse network of university-based biological field stations in the world, with 36 sites covering more than 135,000 acres. This essay examines the founding (...)
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  2. Peter S. Alagona, John Sandlos & Yolanda F. Wiersma (2012). Past Imperfect. Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):49-70.
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  3. Peter Alagona & Gregory Simon (2012). Leave No Trace Starts at Home: A Response to Critics and Vision for the Future. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (1):119 - 124.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 1, Page 119-124, March 2012.
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  4. Gregory L. Simon & Peter S. Alagona (2009). Beyond Leave No Trace. Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (1):17-34.
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  5. Peter S. Alagona (2004). Biography of a "Feathered Pig": The California Condor Conservation Controversy. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):557 - 583.
    In the early 20th century, after hundreds of years of gradual decline, the California condor emerged as an object of intensive scientific study, an important conservation target, and a cultural icon of the American wilderness preservation movement. Early condor researchers generally believed that the species' survival depended upon the preservation of its wilderness habitat. However, beginning in the 1970s, a new generation of scientists argued that no amount of wilderness could prevent the condor's decline and that only intensive scientific management (...)
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  6. Peter S. Alagona (2004). The Ghosts of Endangered Species Past: Recent Lessons at the Intersection of History and Biology. Bioscience 54 (11):984.
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