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Profile: Peter B. Reiner (University of British Columbia)
  1.  13
    Gidon Felsen & Peter B. Reiner (2015). What Can Neuroscience Contribute to the Debate Over Nudging? Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (3):469-479.
    Strategies for improving individual decision making have attracted attention from a range of disciplines. Surprisingly, neuroscience has been largely absent from this conversation, despite the fact that it has recently begun illuminating the neural bases of how and why we make decisions, and is poised for further such advances. Here we address empirical and normative questions about “nudging” through the lens of neuroscience. We suggest that the neuroscience of decision making can provide a framework for understanding how nudges work, and (...)
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  2. Nicholas S. Fitz, Roland Nadler, Praveena Manogaran, Eugene W. J. Chong & Peter B. Reiner (2014). Public Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancement. Neuroethics 7 (2):173-188.
    Vigorous debate over the moral propriety of cognitive enhancement exists, but the views of the public have been largely absent from the discussion. To address this gap in our knowledge, four experiments were carried out with contrastive vignettes in order to obtain quantitative data on public attitudes towards cognitive enhancement. The data collected suggest that the public is sensitive to and capable of understanding the four cardinal concerns identified by neuroethicists, and tend to cautiously accept cognitive enhancement even as they (...)
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  3.  10
    Nicholas S. Fitz & Peter B. Reiner (2015). The Challenge of Crafting Policy for Do-It-Yourself Brain Stimulation. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):410-412.
    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a simple means of brain stimulation, possesses a trifecta of appealing features: it is relatively safe, relatively inexpensive and relatively effective. It is also relatively easy to obtain a device and the do-it-yourself (DIY) community has become galvanised by reports that tDCS can be used as an all-purpose cognitive enhancer. We provide practical recommendations designed to guide balanced discourse, propagate norms of safe use and stimulate dialogue between the DIY community and regulatory authorities. We call (...)
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  4.  7
    Saskia K. Nagel & Peter B. Reiner (2013). Autonomy Support to Foster Individuals' Flourishing. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):36 - 37.
  5.  8
    Laura Y. Cabrera, Nicholas S. Fitz & Peter B. Reiner (2015). Reasons for Comfort and Discomfort with Pharmacological Enhancement of Cognitive, Affective, and Social Domains. Neuroethics 8 (2):93-106.
    The debate over the propriety of cognitive enhancement evokes both enthusiasm and worry. To gain further insight into the reasons that people may have for endorsing or eschewing pharmacological enhancement, we used empirical tools to explore public attitudes towards PE of twelve cognitive, affective, and social domains. Participants from Canada and the United States were recruited using Mechanical Turk and were randomly assigned to read one vignette that described an individual who uses a pill to enhance a single domain. After (...)
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  6.  11
    Fay Niker, Peter B. Reiner & Gidon Felsen (forthcoming). Updating Our Selves: Synthesizing Philosophical and Neurobiological Perspectives on Incorporating New Information Into Our Worldview. Neuroethics:1-10.
    Given the ubiquity and centrality of social and relational influences to the human experience, our conception of self-governance must adequately account for these external influences. The inclusion of socio-historical, externalist considerations into more traditional internalist accounts of autonomy has been an important feature of the debate over personal autonomy in recent years. But the relevant socio-temporal dynamics of autonomy are not only historical in nature. There are also important, and under-examined, future-oriented questions about how we retain autonomy while incorporating new (...)
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  7.  15
    Laura Y. Cabrera, Nicholas S. Fitz & Peter B. Reiner (2015). Empirical Support for the Moral Salience of the Therapy-Enhancement Distinction in the Debate Over Cognitive, Affective and Social Enhancement. Neuroethics 8 (3):243-256.
    The ambiguity regarding whether a given intervention is perceived as enhancement or as therapy might contribute to the angst that the public expresses with respect to endorsement of enhancement. We set out to develop empirical data that explored this. We used Amazon Mechanical Turk to recruit participants from Canada and the United States. Each individual was randomly assigned to read one vignette describing the use of a pill to enhance one of 12 cognitive, affective or social domains. The vignettes described (...)
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  8.  30
    Peter B. Reiner (2011). The Paradox of Addiction Neuroscience. Neuroethics 4 (2):65-77.
    Neuroscience has substantially advanced the understanding of how changes in brain biochemistry contribute to mechanisms of tolerance and physical dependence via exposure to addictive drugs. Many scientists and mental health advocates scaffold this emerging knowledge by adding the imprimatur of disease, arguing that conceptualizing addiction as a brain disease will reduce stigma amongst the folk. Promoting a brain disease concept is grounded in beneficent and utilitarian thinking: the language makes room for individuals living with addiction to receive the same level (...)
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  9.  14
    Noah Castelo, Peter B. Reiner & Gidon Felsen (2012). Balancing Autonomy and Decisional Enhancement: An Evidence-Based Approach. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):30-31.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 30-31, February 2012.
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  10. Fay Niker, Peter B. Reiner & Gidon Felsen (2016). Pre-Authorization: A Novel Decision-Making Heuristic That May Promote Autonomy. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (5):27-29.
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