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Profile: Peter B. Reiner (University of British Columbia)
  1. Nicholas S. Fitz & Peter B. Reiner (forthcoming). The Challenge of Crafting Policy for Do-It-Yourself Brain Stimulation. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101458.
    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a simple means of brain stimulation, possesses a trifecta of appealing features: it is relatively safe, relatively inexpensive and relatively effective. It is also relatively easy to obtain a device and the do-it-yourself (DIY) community has become galvanised by reports that tDCS can be used as an all-purpose cognitive enhancer. We provide practical recommendations designed to guide balanced discourse, propagate norms of safe use and stimulate dialogue between the DIY community and regulatory authorities. We call (...)
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  2. Nicholas S. Fitz, Roland Nadler, Praveena Manogaran, Eugene W. J. Chong & Peter B. Reiner (2014). Public Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancement. Neuroethics 7 (2):173-188.
    Vigorous debate over the moral propriety of cognitive enhancement exists, but the views of the public have been largely absent from the discussion. To address this gap in our knowledge, four experiments were carried out with contrastive vignettes in order to obtain quantitative data on public attitudes towards cognitive enhancement. The data collected suggest that the public is sensitive to and capable of understanding the four cardinal concerns identified by neuroethicists, and tend to cautiously accept cognitive enhancement even as they (...)
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  3. Saskia K. Nagel & Peter B. Reiner (2013). Autonomy Support to Foster Individuals' Flourishing. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):36 - 37.
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  4. Noah Castelo, Peter B. Reiner & Gidon Felsen (2012). Balancing Autonomy and Decisional Enhancement: An Evidence-Based Approach. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):30-31.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 30-31, February 2012.
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  5. Peter B. Reiner (2011). The Paradox of Addiction Neuroscience. Neuroethics 4 (2):65-77.
    Neuroscience has substantially advanced the understanding of how changes in brain biochemistry contribute to mechanisms of tolerance and physical dependence via exposure to addictive drugs. Many scientists and mental health advocates scaffold this emerging knowledge by adding the imprimatur of disease, arguing that conceptualizing addiction as a brain disease will reduce stigma amongst the folk. Promoting a brain disease concept is grounded in beneficent and utilitarian thinking: the language makes room for individuals living with addiction to receive the same level (...)
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