Search results for 'Peter C. Adamson' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Peter Adamson (Creighton University)
  1.  10
    Peter C. Adamson, Carmen Paradis, Martin L. Smith, Nicholas Agar, Jacob M. Appel, David Benatar, Nancy Berlinger, Daniel Brudney, Lucy M. Candib & Arthur L. Caplan (2007). Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 37 of the Hastings Center Report, Covering All Feature Material From 2007. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 37 (2007) and May Be Purchased for $16.00 Each, Plus Shipping. Please Contact the Circulation Department, The Hastings Center, 21 Malcolm Gordon Road, Garrison, NY 10524; Tel.:(845) 424-4040; Fax:(845) 424-4545; E-Mail: Publications@ Thehastingscenter. Org. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 37.
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  2.  14
    Peter C. Adamson, Carmen Paradis & Martin L. Smith (2007). All for One, or One for All? Hastings Center Report 37 (4):13-15.
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  3.  36
    Peter Adamson & Richard C. Taylor (eds.) (2005). The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy written in Arabic and in the Islamic world represents one of the great traditions of Western philosophy. Inspired by Greek philosophical works and the indigenous ideas of Islamic theology, Arabic philosophers from the ninth century onwards put forward ideas of great philosophical and historical importance. This collection of essays, by some of the leading scholars in Arabic philosophy, provides an introduction to the field by way of chapters devoted to individual thinkers (such as al-Farabi, Avicenna and Averroes) or groups, (...)
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  4.  1
    Peter Adamson (2012). Epistles of the Brethren of Purity. On Logic: An Arabic Critical Edition and English Translation of Epistles 10–14. Edited and Translated by C. Baffioni. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 23 (3):363-366.
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  5. Peter Adamson (2012). Creation and the God of Abraham Edited by D. B. Burrell, C. Cogliati, J. M. Soskice, and W. R. Stoeger. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 23 (1):89-91.
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  6. Peter Adamson & Richard C. Taylor (eds.) (2006). The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy written in Arabic and in the Islamic world represents one of the great traditions of Western philosophy. Inspired by Greek philosophical works and the indigenous ideas of Islamic theology, Arabic philosophers from the ninth century onwards put forward ideas of great philosophical and historical importance. This collection of essays, by some of the leading scholars in Arabic philosophy, provides an introduction to the field by way of chapters devoted to individual thinkers or groups, especially during the 'classical' period from (...)
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  7. Peter Adamson & Richard C. Taylor (eds.) (2004). The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy written in Arabic and in the Islamic world represents one of the great traditions of Western philosophy. Inspired by Greek philosophical works and the indigenous ideas of Islamic theology, Arabic philosophers from the ninth century onwards put forward ideas of great philosophical and historical importance. This collection of essays, by some of the leading scholars in Arabic philosophy, provides an introduction to the field by way of chapters devoted to individual thinkers or groups, especially during the 'classical' period from (...)
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  8.  14
    Peter Adamson (2007). Al-Kindī. Oxford University Press.
    Al-Kindi was the first philosopher of the Islamic world. He lived in Iraq and studied in Baghdad, where he became attached to the caliphal court. In due course he would become an important figure at court: a tutor to the caliph's son, and a central figure in the translation movement of the ninth century, which rendered much of Greek philosophy, science, and medicine into Arabic. Al-Kindi's wide-ranging intellectual interests included not only philosophy but also music, astronomy, mathematics, and medicine. Through (...)
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  9.  17
    Peter Adamson, Al-Kindi. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Al-Kindi was the first philosopher of the Islamic world. He lived in Iraq and studied in Baghdad, where he became attached to the caliphal court. In due course he would become an important figure at court: a tutor to the caliph's son, and a central figure in the translation movement of the ninth century, which rendered much of Greek philosophy, science, and medicine into Arabic. Al-Kindi's wide-ranging intellectual interests included not only philosophy but also music, astronomy, mathematics, and medicine. Through (...)
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  10.  10
    Peter Adamson (2006). Al-Kind=I. OUP Usa.
    The first book in the Great Medieval Thinkers series to focus on an Islamic philosopher. It offers a brief, accessible introduction to the thought of the philosopher al -Kindi . His works, though brief, are of great historical importance. Al-Kindi was the first philosopher of the Islamic world. Peter Adamson will survey what is known of al-Kindi's life, examine his thought on a wide range of topics, and consider the relationship of al-Kindi's work to his Greek sources.
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  11. Peter Adamson (2016). Classical Philosophy: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps, Volume 1. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Classical Philosophy is the first of a series of books in which Peter Adamson aims ultimately to present a complete history of philosophy, more thoroughly but also more enjoyably than ever before. In short, lively chapters, based on the popular History of Philosophy podcast, he offers an accessible, humorous, and detailed look at the emergence of philosophy with the Presocratics, the probing questions of Socrates, and the first full flowering of philosophy with the dialogues of Plato and the (...)
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  12.  12
    Peter Adamson (2014). Classical Philosophy: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps, Volume 1. OUP Oxford.
    In 43 lively chapters Peter Adamson tells the story of philosophy from its beginnings to Plato and Aristotle. Most histories jump from one famous name to another, but Adamson shows that the people and ideas in between, usually overlooked, are fascinating and significant. Based on his popular podcasts, this is serious history with a light touch.
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  13. Peter Adamson (2015). Philosophy in the Hellenistic and Roman Worlds: A History of Philosophy Wthout Any Gaps, Volume 2. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Peter Adamson offers an accessible, humorous tour through a period of eight hundred years when some of the most influential of all schools of thought were formed. He introduces us to Cynics and Skeptics, Epicureans and Stoics, emperors and slaves, and traces the development of early Christian philosophy and of ancient science. A major theme of the book is in fact the competition between pagan and Christian philosophy in this period, and the Jewish tradition appears in the shape (...)
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  14. Peter Adamson (2015). Philosophy in the Islamic World: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press Uk.
    In the history of philosophy, few topics are so relevant to today's cultural and political landscape as philosophy in the Islamic world. Yet, this remains one of the lesser-known philosophical traditions. In this Very Short Introduction, Peter Adamson explores the history of philosophy among Muslims, Jews, and Christians living in Islamic lands, from its historical background to thinkers in the twentieth century.Introducing the main philosophical themes of the Islamic world, Adamson integrates ideas from the Islamic and Abrahamic (...)
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  15. Peter Adamson (2016). Philosophy in the Islamic World: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps, Volume 3. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Peter Adamson presents the first full history of philosophy in the Islamic world for a broad readership. He traces its development from early Islam to the 20th century, ranging from Spain to South Asia, featuring Jewish and Christian thinkers as well as Muslim. Major figures like Avicenna, Averroes, and Maimonides are covered in great detail, but the book also looks at less familiar thinkers, including women philosophers. Attention is also given to the philosophical relevance of Islamic theology and (...)
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  16.  6
    James W. Allard, David Bradshaw, Aristotle East, Ronald Bruzina & Edmund Husserl (2005). ADAMSON Peter and Richard C. Taylor (Eds): The Cambridge Companion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):415-419.
  17.  11
    Jon McGinnis (2005). Review of Peter Adamson (Ed.), Richard C. Taylor (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (5).
  18.  2
    Patrick Madigan (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy. Edited by Peter Adamson and Richard C. Taylor. Heythrop Journal 48 (2):298–299.
  19.  8
    Rozsa Peter (1937). Review: S. C. Kleene, $Lambda$-Definability and Recursiveness. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 2 (1):38-39.
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  20.  3
    Brittany Frisch, Angie Edwards, Jamie Maguire, Stephanie Hoppe, Leigh Schuldt, Nick Wilcox, Kelsey Prosser, Rebecca Anderson, Erica Peter & Jessica Rix (forthcoming). Bioethics C&C. Bioethics.
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  21.  2
    Rozsa Peter (1937). Review: S. C. Kleene, General Recursive Functions of Natural Numbers. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 2 (1):38-38.
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  22.  2
    Rozsa Peter (1939). Review: S. C. Kleene, On Notation for Ordinal Numbers. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 4 (2):93-94.
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  23.  1
    Rozsa Peter (1951). Review: S. C. Kleene, A Symmetric Form of Godel's Theorem. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 16 (2):147-147.
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  24. R. Adamson (1886). J. C. Murray, A Handbook of Psychology. [REVIEW] Mind 11:252.
     
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  25. Peter E. Pormann & Peter Adamson (eds.) (2012). The Philosophical Works of Al-Kindi. OUP Pakistan.
    Al-Kindī, honoured as the 'philosopher of the Arabs', was the first philosopher of Islam. His pioneer philosophical writings engage with ideas that became available through the Graeco-Arabic translation movement. This volume makes his entire philosophical output-some two dozen works-available in English, most of them for the first time. An overall introduction, introductions to each work and extensive notes explain al-Kindī's ideas, sources, and influence.
     
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  26. Peter Adamson (ed.) (2013). Interpreting Avicenna: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Avicenna is the greatest philosopher of the Islamic world. His immense impact on Christian and Jewish medieval thought, as well as on the subsequent Islamic tradition, is charted in this volume alongside studies which provide a comprehensive introduction to and analysis of his philosophy. Contributions from leading scholars address a wide range of topics including Avicenna's life and works, conception of philosophy and achievement in logic and medicine. His ideas in the main areas of philosophy, such as epistemology, philosophy of (...)
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  27.  13
    Peter Adamson (2015). Neoplatonism: The Last Ten Years. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 9 (2):205-220.
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  28. Peter Adamson, H. Baltussen & M. W. F. Stone (2005). Abel, Félix M.,'Saint Jérome et les prophéties messianiques', Revue biblique, ns, 13 (1916), 423–40; 14 (1917), 247–69 Abū Macshar al-Balkhī, Kitāb al-madkhal al-kabīr ilā cilm ah kām al-nujūm: Liber introductorii maioris ad scientiam judiciorum astrorum, ed. by Richard Lemay, 9 vols (Naples: Istituto universitario Orientale, 1995–96). [REVIEW] Dionysius 23:105-16.
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  29. Peter Adamson (2003). Review: Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (446):363-366.
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  30. Peter Adamson (2003). Al-Kindi and the Mu‘Tazila: Divine Attributes, Creation and Freedom. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (1):45-77.
    The paper discusses al-Kindi's response to doctrines held by contemporary theologians of the Mu‘tazilite school: divine attributes, creation, and freedom. In the first section it is argued that, despite his broadly negative theology, al-Kindi recognizes a special kind of “essential” positive attribute belonging to God. The second section argues that al-Kindi agreed with the Mu‘tazila in holding that something may not yet exist but still be an object of God's knowledge and power (as the Mu‘tazila put it, that “non-being” is (...)
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  31.  96
    Peter Adamson (2002). Before Essence and Existence: Al-Kindi's Conception of Being. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (3):297-312.
    This paper studies the first metaphysical theory in Arabic philosophy, that of al-Kindi, as found in "On First Philosophy" and other of his works. Placing these works against the background of translations produced in al-Kindi's circle (the "Theology of Aristotle," which is the Arabic version of Plotinus, and the "Liber de Causis," the Arabic version of Proclus' "Elements of Theology"), it argues that al-Kindi has two conceptions of being: "simple" being, which excludes predication and derives from Neoplatonism, and "complex" being, (...)
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  32.  7
    Peter Adamson (2015). Miskawayh on Pleasure. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 25 (2):199-223.
  33. Peter Adamson (ed.) (2008). In the Age of Al-Fārābī: Arabic Philosophy in the Fourth-Tenth Century. Warburg Institute.
  34.  43
    Peter Adamson (2006). Vision, Light and Color in Al-Kindi, Ptolemy and the Ancient Commentators. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 16 (2):207-236.
    Al-Kindi was influenced by two Greek traditions in his attempts to explain vision, light and color. Most obviously, his works on optics are indebted to Euclid and, perhaps indirectly, to Ptolemy. But he also knew some works from the Aristotelian tradition that touch on the nature of color and vision. Al-Kindi explicitly rejects the Aristotelian account of vision in his De Aspectibus, and adopts a theory according to which we see by means of a visual ray emitted from the eye. (...)
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  35.  65
    Peter Adamson (2006). The Arabic Sea Battle: Al-Fārābī on the Problem of Future Contingents. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 88 (2):163-188.
    Ancient commentators like Ammonius and Boethius tried to solve Aristotle's “sea battle argument” in On Interpretation 9 by saying that statements about future contingents are “indefinitely” true or false. They were followed by al-Fārābī in his commentary on On Interpretation. The article sets out two possible interpretations of what “indefinitely” means here, and shows that al-Fārābī actually has both conceptions: one applied in his interpretation of Aristotle, and another that he is forced into by the problem of divine foreknowledge. It (...)
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  36.  75
    Peter Adamson, The Theology of Aristotle. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  37.  51
    Peter Adamson (2001). Aristotelianism and the Soul in the Arabic Plotinus. Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (2):211-232.
  38. Peter Adamson (2002). The Arabic Plotinus: A Philosophical Study of the Theology of Aristotle. Duckworth.
  39.  56
    Peter Adamson (2005). On Knowledge of Particulars. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (3):273–294.
    Avicenna's notorious claim that God knows particulars only 'in a universal way' is argued to have its roots in Aristotelian epistemology, and especially in the "Posterior Analytics". According to Avicenna and Aristotle as understood by Avicenna, there is in fact no such thing as 'knowledge' of particulars, at least not as such. Rather, a particular can only be known by subsuming it under a universal. Thus Avicenna turns out to be committed to a much more surprising epistemological thesis: even humans (...)
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  40.  44
    Peter Adamson (2012). Neoplatonism. [REVIEW] Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 57 (4):380-399.
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  41.  28
    Peter Adamson (2011). Knowing What's Good for You. The Philosophers' Magazine 53 (53):85-90.
    We should see a very close connection between two fields of philosophy which are nowadays kept well apart, namely ethics and epistemology. Indeed, if the good life and virtue consist in knowledge, then the study of knowledge just is the study of ethics.
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  42.  44
    Peter Adamson (2008). Plotinus' Cosmology. A Study of Ennead II.1 (40). Text, Translation and Commentary. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (2):219-223.
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  43.  29
    Peter Adamson (2012). Neoplatonism. [REVIEW] Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 57 (4):380-399.
  44.  10
    C. S. Adamson (1893). Schanz's Collation of the Bodleian Plato. The Classical Review 7 (10):444-448.
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  45.  22
    Peter Adamson & Peter E. Pormann (2009). Aristotle's Categories and the Soul : An Annotated Translation of Al-Kindī's That There Are Separate Substances. In Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth & John M. Dillon (eds.), The Afterlife of the Platonic Soul: Reflections of Platonic Psychology in the Monotheistic Religions. Brill
  46.  27
    Peter Adamson (2004). Avicenna and Aristotle R. Wisnovsky: Avicenna's Metaphysics in Context . Pp. XII + 305. London: Duckworth, 2003. Cased, £50. Isbn: 0-7156-3221-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):354-.
  47.  14
    Peter Adamson (2000). Two Early Arabic Doxographies on the Soul. Modern Schoolman 77 (2):105-125.
  48.  13
    Peter Adamson (2012). Abū Bakr Al-Rāzī on Animals. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 94 (3):249-273.
    Abū Bakr al-Rāzī (d. 925), a doctor known not only for his medical expertise but also for his notorious philosophical ideas, has not yet been given due credit for his ideas on the ethical treatment of animals. This paper explores the philosophical and theological background of his remarks on animal welfare, arguing that al-Rāzī did not (as has been claimed) see animals as possessing rational, intellectual souls like those of humans. It is also argued that al-Rāzī probably did not, as (...)
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  49.  9
    Peter Adamson (2008). Culture and Philosophy in the Age of Plotinus. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (1):79-81.
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  50.  8
    Peter Adamson (2012). And Theology Before Avicenna. In John Marenbon (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press 58.
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