1. Peter Coghlan (2011). Form and Content in Romulus, My Father. In Christopher Cordner & Raimond Gaita (eds.), Philosophy, Ethics, and a Common Humanity: Essays in Honour of Raimond Gaita. Routledge.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Peter Coghlan & Nick Trakakis (2006). Confronting the Horror of Natural Evil: An Exchange Between Peter Coghlan and Nick Trakakis. Sophia 45 (2):5-26.
    In this exchange, Peter Coghlan and Nick Trakakis discuss the problem of natural evil in the light of the recent Asian tsunami disaster. The exchange begins with an extract from a newspaper article written by Coghlan on the tsunami, followed by three rounds of replies and counter-replies, and ending with some final comments from Trakakis. While critical of any attempt to show that human life is good overall despite its natural evils, Coghlan argues that instances of natural evil, even horrific (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Peter Coghlan (2005). The Prodigal and His Brother: Impartiality and the Equal Consideration of Interests. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):195-206.
    At the heart of Peter Singer’s utilitarianism is the impartial weighing of the interests of those affected by our actions. Singer calls this the Principle of Equal Consideration of Interests. This paper argues that Singer’s Principle does not accord with our moral intuitions and the logic of our moral thinking. It discusses the Principle in the context of the parable of the Prodigal Son and his Brother – a parable that raises the issue of impartiality in a particularly challenging way. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation