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  1. Peter D. Fenves (2011). The Messianic Reduction: Walter Benjamin and the Shape of Time. Stanford University Press.
    Introduction : the course of the argument -- Substance poem versus function poem : two poems of Friedrich Hölderlin -- Entering the phenomenological school and discovering the color of shame -- Existence toward space : two "Rainbows" from around 1916 -- The problem of historical time : conversing with Scholem, criticizing Heidegger in 1916 -- Meaning in the proper sense of the word : "On language as such and on human language" and related logico-linguistic studies -- Pure knowledge and the (...)
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  2. Peter D. Fenves (2007). Marital, Martial, Maritime Law: Toward Some Controversial Passages in Kant's Doctrine of Right. Diacritics 35 (4):101-120.
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  3. Peter D. Fenves (2003). Late Kant: Towards Another Law of the Earth. Routledge.
    Fenves becomes one of the first to thoroughly explore Kant's later writings and give them the detailed scholarly attention they deserve. In his opening chapters, Fenves examines in detail the various essays in which Kant invents, formulates and complicates the thesis of "radical evil"--a thesis which serves as the point of departure for all his later writings. Late Kant then turns towards the counter-thesis of "radical mean-ness," which states that human beings exist on earth for the sake of another species (...)
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  4. Peter D. Fenves (2001). Arresting Language: From Leibniz to Benjamin. Stanford University Press.
    Speech act theory has taught us 'how to do things with words'. Arresting Language turns its attention in the opposite direction - toward the surprising things that language can undo and leave undone. In the eight essays of this volume, arresting language is seen as language at rest, words no longer in service to the project of establishing conventions or instituting legal regimes. Concentrating on both widely-known and seldom-read texts from a variety of philosophers, writers, and critics - from Leibniz (...)
     
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  5. Peter D. Fenves (1998). "Out of the Order of Number": Benjamin and Irigaray Toward a Politics of Pure Means. Diacritics 28 (1):43-58.
  6. Peter D. Fenves (1993). "Chatter": Language and History in Kierkegaard. Stanford University Press.
    'Chatter' cannot always be taken lightly, for its insignificance and insubstantiality challenge the very notions of substance and significance through which rational discourses seek justification. This book shows that in 'chatter' Kierkegaard uncovered a specifically linguistic mode of negativity. The author examines in detail those writings of Kierkegaard in which he undertook complex negotiations with the threat - and also the promise - of 'chatter', which cuts across the distinctions in which the relation of language to reality - and above (...)
     
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  7. Peter D. Fenves (1991). A Peculiar Fate: Metaphysics and World-History in Kant. Cornell University Press.
     
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